FamilySearch: Microfilm order deadline extended

NOTE FROM DearMYRTLE: The following was received from our friends at FamilySearch.org and include the digitization priority request info Director of Patron Services Diane Loosle promised when she visited with us during the first hour of our Mondays with Myrt (hangout) 14 Aug 2017

UPDATE: FamilySearch Digital Records Access Replacing Microfilm

FamilySSearch digitization

IMAGE: Courtesy of FamilySearch.org

Thursday, September 7, 2017, marks the closing of an 80-year era of historic records access to usher in a new, digital model. FamilySearch is discontinuing its microfilm circulation services in concert with its commitment to make billions of the world’s historic records readily accessible digitally online. (See FamilySearch Digital Records Access Replacing Microfilm). As its remaining microfilms are digitized, FamilySearch has provided additional information to users of its historic microfilm program.

FamilySearch, a global leader in historic records preservation and access, began microfilming historic records in 1938. Advancements in technology have enabled it to be more efficient, making an unbelievable tide of digital images of historic records accessible much quicker online and to a far greater customer base.

FamilySearch released a list of helpful facts and tips to help patrons better navigate the transition from microfilm to digital.

QUICK FACTS AND TIPS

  • Patrons can still order microfilms online until Thursday, September 7, 2017.
  • After film ordering ends, if customers need access to a particular film yet to be digitized, they can express interest to have it added to the priority digitization list by contacting FamilySearch Support (Toll Free: 1-866-406-1830).
  • All of the microfilm rented by patrons in the past 5 years have now been digitized by FamilySearch—over 1.5 million microfilms (ca. 1.5 billion images).
  • The remaining microfilms are being digitally scanned at a rate of 1,000 films per day and are projected to be complete by 2020.
  • New digital images are available as they are scanned in the FamilySearch.org Catalog.
  • Films currently on loan in family history centers and affiliate libraries are automatically granted extended loan status.
  • Affiliate libraries now have access to nearly all of the restricted image collections as family history centers.
  • Visitors to the Family History Library in Salt Lake City will still be able to order needed microfilms to use during their research visits.

HOW TO FIND DIGITAL IMAGES ON FAMILYSEARCH

Digital image collections can be accessed today in 3 places on FamilySearch.org, all under Search.

  • Catalog. Includes a description of all the microfilms and digital images in the FamilySearch collection. This is where all of FamilySearch’s digitized microfilm and new digital images from its global camera operations are being published. A camera icon appears in the Catalog adjacent to a microfilm listing when it is available digitally.
  • Records includes collections that have been indexed by name or published with additional waypoints to help browse the unindexed images.
  • Books include digital copies of books from the Family History Library and other libraries, including many books that were previously copied to microfilm.

For additional help, see Finding Digital Images of Records on FamilySearch.org, or watch this how-to video “Where are the digitized records on FamilySearch?

“FamilySearch is committed to meeting customers’ needs as much as possible during this transition to digital access,” said Diane Loosle, FamilySearch’s Director of Patron Services. “We really appreciate the wonderful feedback we have received since the initial announcement. It is helping us better facilitate customer experiences during this next phase.”

Loosle said FamilySearch’s over 5,000 family history centers will continue to provide access to relevant technology, premium subscription services, and digital records, including restricted content not available at home. Centers have the option to return microfilm that is available online or otherwise not needed. As more images are published online, centers may reevaluate whether to retain microfilm holdings.

See Frequently Asked Questions: Digital Access Replacing Microfilms for more information.

About FamilySearch

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 5,000 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Missing Mondays with Myrt? View TIME LINES

Gosh, how can it be Monday without hanging out together? If you are like Ol’ Myrt here, suffering withdrawal, why not tune in to this WACKY Wednesday session featuring Dr. Shelley Murphy. It’s all about how time lines can organize our research findings and assist in arriving at conclusions about events in an ancestor’s life.

 

Happy family tree climbing@
Myrt     🙂
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.


 

Family Nexus App while traveling? It’s easy & fun

Ol’ Myrt here has been getting a plethora of pings from her newly updated The Family Nexus app. It’s a good thing Mr. Myrt is driving!

We are rushing to get to the FGS Conference in Pittsburgh but now I’m looking at landscapes and putting my ancestors in topographical perspective.

I cannot imagine what giving birth would have been like for my 2nd great-grandmother Betsey (Oades) Player “under Lone Tree at Watch Creek, plains of Nebraska.” But today as we crossed the now more verdant plains of Nebraska I could begin to picture the scene.

The Family Nexus App gives me a ping on my iPhone and my Apple Watch whenever I am near an ancestral birth, marriage, death or burial location listed in my FamilySearch Family Tree. That tree integration means no extra typing or cumbersome data imports.

Looking at this screen shot from my Family Nexus app also helps us determine the route to take tomorrow. It’s looks like Ohio has 28 family history event locations. Pennsylvania has some 48 including the birthplace of my 4th great-grand uncle Daniel Shafer born in 1793.

It isn’t like Ol’ Myrt here doesn’t understand geography. I can name every state capitol in competition with my grandchildren.

 It’s just that in the hustle and bustle of traveling, it’s easy to focus on rest stops instead of super cool family history spots.

And speaking of grandchildren – they’d get a kick out of this cool app. It certainly is more fun to explore family history ‘on site’ instead of ‘on paper.’

To find out more about this neat 21st century genea-tool visit:

 

 

 

http://thefamilynexus.com

 

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt 🙂
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.

 


 

Oops! There was no “mother” field in the 1900 census despite Ancestry.com field label

NOTE FROM DearMYRTLE: This is a detailed commentary composed with the hope Ancestry.com will take immediate action to remedy this situation.

Is Ancestry “dreaming up” new census fields for the 1900 US federal population abstracts associated with its collection of census images? Maybe Ancestry is interpreting what an enumerator meant he made notations in various fields on his census form?

We look to evidence of abstract screen shots shared by Russ Worthington in his blog post Observations of the new Ancestry .api posted on his FTMUser blog today.

Russ viewed indexed entries and accompanying digital image of original census pages through his Family Tree Maker 2017 software. The problem has little if anything to do with FTM or RootsMagic, but instead reveals a problem with how Ancestry.com presents the indexed entries on its website.

Here are Ol’ Myrt’s concerns.

THERE WAS NO MOTHER FIELD

Why has Ancestry chosen to rename the “relationship to head of family” field to “mother”?

It sounds like a database manager, rather than a genealogist, has become overly creative but incorrect with labels for indexed data. This problem will lead less experienced researchers to incorrect relationship conclusions.

Using Ancestry’s iOS app, I ran into this same problem. When reviewing a census image, the abstract assumed the wife was mother to all children in the household. Luckily I knew about a first wife who died. I had to go to my desktop and update my Ancestry Member Tree to assign children in the census to the correct parents and attach the census image manually.

This begs the question – what if I didn’t know about the first wife and her several children?

How does this happen?

In Russ’ example and mine, Ancestry’s census abstracts assume a woman listed as a wife to head of family is the mother to those listed as sons and daughters of the head of family, when in fact she may not be.(1)

REGARDING ETHNICITY

Cousin Russ correctly noticed there was no field labeled “Ethnicity” though the 1900 population schedule does have a tiny column “Race or Color.” WHY has Ancestry chosen to rename the field “ethnicity”?

Why is Ancestry interpreting abbreviations?

There is no ethnicity known as “American” nor is there room to write that in the tiny box. (2) Only these abbreviations are found in “126. Column 5 Color or Race” description.

  • “W  white
  • B = black (negro or of negro descent)
  • Ch = Chinese
  • Jp = Japanese
  • In = Indian
  • As the cas=e may be.” (3)

I’m thinking an unspecified abbreviation “A” written by the enumerator could represent “Asian” (different from Chinese or Japanese) but it certainly could not be “American” since there is no such race or color. Either way, only the letter “A” should appear in Ancestry’s abstract.

In Russ’ example the letter “W” for white has been entered as “American” in Ancestry’s abstract.

TYPE WHAT YOU SEE

It appears Ancestry database managers have incorrectly and inappropriately chosen to interpret what an enumerator wrote in a column of abbreviations? (Sigh)

In the US we consider a transcript a word-for-word printed or typed version of a document.

In the US we consider an abstract a selection of text from a document considered important for the purposes of the abstractor. This make take the form on an index.

 Myrt’s Musings

In no way should a transcript, abstract or index depart from original spelling, abbreviations or labels in a document; nor should the compiler of a transcript, abstract or index interpret the original text.

Anything less increases the possibility that those reading the transcript, abstract or index may draw the wrong conclusion.

 This is is a case for “get the original.”

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt 🙂
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.

1) “125. Column 4 Relationship to head of family”, 12th Census of the United States Instructions to Enumerators (Washington DC: Census Bureau, 1900) p 28. (https://www.census.gov / viewed 27 Aug 2017). Note the scanned images in .PDF format are linked here: : https://www.census.gov/history/www/through_the_decades/index_of_questions/1900_1.html

(2) “126. Column 5 Color or Race”, 12th Census of the United States Instructions to Enumerators (Washington DC: Census Bureau, 1900) p 29. (https://www.census.gov / viewed 27 Aug 2017). Note the scanned image in .PDF format linked here: https://www.census.gov/history/www/through_the_decades/index_of_questions/1900_1.html

(3) I.B.I.D.


 

Register: September DearMYRTLE Hangouts

Before Ol’ Myrt here left for the 2017 Federation of Genealogical Society’s annual conference, she made sure to schedule and post pages for September genealogy hangouts. You’ll notice the usual Mondays with Myrt, WACKY Wednesday, Genealogy Game Night, DNAgen Study Group and The Archive Lady hangouts.

New this month is the debut of the much anticipated Norwegian Genealogy Study Group with Liv Birgit Christensen, a resident of Norway who really knows her stuff. We also begin our study of Thomas W. Jone’s newest book, Mastering Genealogical Documentation.

GenDoc STUDY GROUP 1 (60 minutes) Wednesday, 13 Sept 2017 
Chapter 1 – “The Purpose and Nature of Genealogical Documentation” from Thomas W. Jones’ Mastering Genealogical DocumentationNoon Eastern US (New York), 11am Central US (Chicago), 10am Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 9am Pacific US (Los Angeles).

WACKY WEDNESDAY (60 minutes)
Wednesday, 13 Sept 2017 This will be in Lieu of the Mondays with Myrt hangouts we miss earlier in the month while Ol’ Myrt is traveling. 9pm Eastern US (New York), 8pm Central US (Chicago), 7pm Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 6pm Pacific US (Los Angeles).

GENEALOGY GAME NIGHT(60 minutes) Saturday, 16 Sept 2017 A chance to practice using your headset mic and web cam. 9pm Eastern US (New York), 8pm Central US (Chicago), 7pm Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 6pm Pacific US (Los Angeles).

MONDAYS WITH MYRT (90 minutes) 18 Sept 2017 Noon Eastern US (New York), 11am Central US (Chicago), 10am Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 9am Pacific US (Los Angeles).

NORWEGIAN GENEALOGY 1 (60 minutes) with Liv Birgit Christensen Tuesday, 19 Sept 2017 Noon Eastern US (New York), 11am Central US (Chicago), 10am Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 9am Pacific US (Los Angeles).

GenDoc STUDY GROUP (60 minutes) Wednesday, 20 Sept 2017 Chapter 2 – “Noncitation Aspects of Genealogical Documentation” from Thomas W. Jones’ Mastering Genealogical DocumentationNoon Eastern US (New York), 11am Central US (Chicago), 10am Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 9am Pacific US (Los Angeles).

DNAGen STUDY GROUP (60 minutes) Wednesday, 20 Sept 2017 Read in advance and complete the homework at the end of Chapter 8 “Incorporating DNA Evidence in a Written Conclusion” in Genetic Genealogy in Practice by Blaine T. Bettinger and Debbie Parker Wayne. Now also available in Kindle format. You must attend this hangout live as it will not be available for access later, due to copyright restrictions.
9pm Eastern US (New York), 8pm Central US (Chicago), 7pm Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 6pm Pacific US (Los Angeles).

MONDAYS WITH MYRT (90 minutes) Monday, 25 Sept 2017 Noon Eastern US (New York), 11am Central US (Chicago), 10am Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 9am Pacific US (Los Angeles).

NORWEGIAN GENEALOGY 2 (60 minutes) with Liv Birgit Christensen Tuesday, 26 Sept 2017 Noon Eastern US (New York), 11am Central US (Chicago), 10am Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 9am Pacific US (Los Angeles).

GenDoc STUDY GROUP (60 minutes) Wednesday, 27 Sept 2017 Chapter 3 – “Citation Settings, Forms and Shortcuts” from Thomas W. Jones’ Mastering Genealogical Documentation Noon Eastern US (New York), 11am Central US (Chicago), 10am Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 9am Pacific US (Los Angeles).

THE ARCHIVE LADY (60 minutes) Wednesday, 27 Sept 2017 9pm Eastern US (New York), 8pm Central US (Chicago), 7pm Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 6pm Pacific US (Los Angeles).