Reporting Errors to Websites

Admittedly the majority of errors are local hardware or end user mistakes. Be sure to eliminate these by keeping your operating system and web browser up to date. Before reporting an error also reboot your device (tablet, smart phone or computer) to verify the problem persists.

As with any website, rather than calling customer support its usually more productive to:

— send a written report, typically found under help/feedback

— describe your equipment – mobile iOS/droid, computer including OS version, web browser including version.

— explain what you were doing when the problem occurred.

— provide ID of ancestor in question or database in question

Being specific and providing technical info pushes your report to the tech team as opposed to the entry-level support team.


 

Traditions of Our Forebearers

DearMYRTLE logoNOTE from DearMYRTLE: There has been a big uproar in social media over the LDS church’s decision to pull out of the Boy Scouts of America in 2020.

In all honesty, I don’t think it has anything to do with gays or permitting girls to join.

I posted the following to effectively stem the tide in my channels, but am now elevating this to blog post status, so my position is perfectly clear. (I don’t know why genealogists get overly political from time to time. I just want to talk about how to research.) 🤗


DearMYRTLE has followers from many walks of life. This has opened my eyes to different ways of thinking. It’s evident to me good people come in all shapes and sizes. For these experiences I am most grateful – even humbled. I hope my children and grandchildren take the time to see people for who they are and aren’t quick to profile.

When we consider the worldwide reach of the LDS Church members, the majority of our youth don’t have access to BSA so this puts a new slant on things.

For many youth throughout the world, Boy Scouts of America frankly isn’t doable.

I believe BSA, with very few exceptions, was a marvelous influence on the boys I grew up with.

As the church has grown to have more members outside the US, our youth are no longer just white, working or middle class. It’s unkind to foist any program on youth who are oft times breadwinners in their family, etc.

For instance, I remember when it was unthinkable for 12-13 year olds to pass the sacrament without wearing a suit and tie. There was instruction on how to polish shoes in preparation for Sunday worship service.

This is now recognized as impractical on many levels in various cultures. Now the emphasis is on presenting one’s best self to the service of our Father in Heaven as we remember the sacrifice of His Son.

We respect the traditions in each culture that for generations have fostered principles of kindness, hard work, respect, honesty and integrity. Things parents and grandparents throughout the ages have encouraged.

I’m glad the church has been working on a youth program that will honor these traditions and inspire living purposeful, loving lives as it can be interpreted in each culture.


 

Having Your Own Database

Since there is no Mondays with Myrt until next week, let’s assist our new DearMYRTLE Facebook Group member Linda who writes:

“Primarily, my first question is there some way I can save all my data from Ancestry.com? I can no longer afford it. If I have to pay for 1 more subscription, to somehow salvage it, I will do that. Then I would like to learn about all the free sites…”

RootsMagic

To meet your requirements, Ol’ Myrt here recommends RootsMagic desktop software. It’s one of two desktop computer programs that can download to your computer everything from your Ancestry Member Tree including attached photos and documents. However, in my tests, RootsMagic is able to do TreeShare more reliably than the other program. The RootsMagic program has a free version and a $29.95 upgrade version and installs on both PC and Mac computers. This is a one time charge, not annual, and permits you to work with multiple family trees like adopted, bloodline, or disproved. I have nine databases on my computer right now – several because I am not yet sure if the family I’m working on belongs in my family tree.

This video explains how to download all data and attached images from an Ancestry Member Tree to a new RootsMagic database.

As with any program, eventually enhancements may be made to the software that might require an upgrade of about $19, but that has happened only every few years or so in my experience.


Don’t worry, Ancestry isn’t planning to get rid of your tree. You just won’t be able to get to the database images you’ve attached to each ancestor until you reactivate your Ancestry account. I’d recommend finding a time dedicated to this transfer process. Then activate your Ancestry account for the minimum one month time period and go for it.


As for free genealogy websites, a good place to begin is with a free account at FamilySearch.org

The product manager for FamilySearch “search” and “hints” advises using the FamilySearch Catalog, since only about 30% of the site’s images are browsable or indexed. Using the catalog you’ll spend most of your time looking for records created in the place where your ancestors once lived. And you won’t know if those ancestors are mentioned in the record set until you look. Some images must be viewed at your local Family History Center, owing to stipulations by the church, courthouse, archive or library that holds the original documents.

Find a local Family History Center here:
https://www.familysearch.orFg/ask/help

The following short 8-minute video features using the FamilySearch Catalog to locate the other 70% of digital images not yet browsable or indexed, demonstrated by Robert Kerher, the FamilySearch product manager I mentioned earlier. Nothing better than getting it directly from the source.


DearMYRTLE logoMyrt’s Musings

Keep me posted on your progress. Cousin Russ and I would be more than happy to walk you through the steps for downloading your Ancestry Member Tree to a new RootsMagic database on your computer. As you may know, we are both out of town on family business at the moment.

For future reference, this is the link to DearMYRTLE’s Event Calendar – http://hangouts.dearmyrtle.com/calendar.html

Here’s the link to the GeneaWebinars Blog & Calendar of other genealogy webinars, chats and hangouts – http://blog.geneawebinars.com/p/calendar.html


WHAT’S NEW? The Virtual Genealogy Society

ANNOUNCING THE VIRTUAL GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY

The Virtual Genealogical Society is a global organization serving family history enthusiasts of all levels, geared towards those:

● whose circumstances make it difficult to attend local genealogical society meetings

● who prefer online presentations, special interest groups (SIGs), conferences, and socializing

● with an interest in connecting, networking, and mentoring with global genealogists

The Virtual Genealogical Society began with the recognition that many family history enthusiasts are merging technology and globalization in their genealogical pursuits. We aim to provide a forum for genealogists to connect, network, and mentor with genealogists around the world through monthly meetings online, webinars, social networking, annual conferences, and in-person meet-ups at conferences, institutes and events around the world.

Membership is just $20 per year and provides:

● 24/7 access to Members-Only section of website

● Recorded monthly webinars by nationally-known speakers

● Webinar handouts

● Live chat with featured speakers in members-only Facebook group

● Fillable PDF forms for family history research

● Digitized monthly newsletter

● Eligibility for prizes offered during monthly webinars

● Access to Special Interest Group (SIG) discussions and handout

● Discount on annual virtual conference registration cost

● Eligibility for prizes during annual virtual conference

● Discounts on genealogy software, databases, publications and products

● Members-only Facebook group for networking, mentoring, and socializing

The Virtual Genealogical Society encourages all members to continue joining the genealogical societies in their local area and/or in the area where their ancestors lived. These societies can provide additional benefits that include:

● Access to their local database of records and indexes

● Mentorship from society members with expertise in local records and repositories

● Field trips to area repositories

The Virtual Genealogical Society will be hosting a three-day virtual conference from November 1-3, 2019. Confirmed presenters are listed on our website:  http://virtualgensoc.com/

For more information, contact us at info@virtualgensoc.com or visit http://virtualgensoc.com/.

FamilySearch: Microfilm order deadline extended

NOTE FROM DearMYRTLE: The following was received from our friends at FamilySearch.org and include the digitization priority request info Director of Patron Services Diane Loosle promised when she visited with us during the first hour of our Mondays with Myrt (hangout) 14 Aug 2017

UPDATE: FamilySearch Digital Records Access Replacing Microfilm

FamilySSearch digitization

IMAGE: Courtesy of FamilySearch.org

Thursday, September 7, 2017, marks the closing of an 80-year era of historic records access to usher in a new, digital model. FamilySearch is discontinuing its microfilm circulation services in concert with its commitment to make billions of the world’s historic records readily accessible digitally online. (See FamilySearch Digital Records Access Replacing Microfilm). As its remaining microfilms are digitized, FamilySearch has provided additional information to users of its historic microfilm program.

FamilySearch, a global leader in historic records preservation and access, began microfilming historic records in 1938. Advancements in technology have enabled it to be more efficient, making an unbelievable tide of digital images of historic records accessible much quicker online and to a far greater customer base.

FamilySearch released a list of helpful facts and tips to help patrons better navigate the transition from microfilm to digital.

QUICK FACTS AND TIPS

  • Patrons can still order microfilms online until Thursday, September 7, 2017.
  • After film ordering ends, if customers need access to a particular film yet to be digitized, they can express interest to have it added to the priority digitization list by contacting FamilySearch Support (Toll Free: 1-866-406-1830).
  • All of the microfilm rented by patrons in the past 5 years have now been digitized by FamilySearch—over 1.5 million microfilms (ca. 1.5 billion images).
  • The remaining microfilms are being digitally scanned at a rate of 1,000 films per day and are projected to be complete by 2020.
  • New digital images are available as they are scanned in the FamilySearch.org Catalog.
  • Films currently on loan in family history centers and affiliate libraries are automatically granted extended loan status.
  • Affiliate libraries now have access to nearly all of the restricted image collections as family history centers.
  • Visitors to the Family History Library in Salt Lake City will still be able to order needed microfilms to use during their research visits.

HOW TO FIND DIGITAL IMAGES ON FAMILYSEARCH

Digital image collections can be accessed today in 3 places on FamilySearch.org, all under Search.

  • Catalog. Includes a description of all the microfilms and digital images in the FamilySearch collection. This is where all of FamilySearch’s digitized microfilm and new digital images from its global camera operations are being published. A camera icon appears in the Catalog adjacent to a microfilm listing when it is available digitally.
  • Records includes collections that have been indexed by name or published with additional waypoints to help browse the unindexed images.
  • Books include digital copies of books from the Family History Library and other libraries, including many books that were previously copied to microfilm.

For additional help, see Finding Digital Images of Records on FamilySearch.org, or watch this how-to video “Where are the digitized records on FamilySearch?

“FamilySearch is committed to meeting customers’ needs as much as possible during this transition to digital access,” said Diane Loosle, FamilySearch’s Director of Patron Services. “We really appreciate the wonderful feedback we have received since the initial announcement. It is helping us better facilitate customer experiences during this next phase.”

Loosle said FamilySearch’s over 5,000 family history centers will continue to provide access to relevant technology, premium subscription services, and digital records, including restricted content not available at home. Centers have the option to return microfilm that is available online or otherwise not needed. As more images are published online, centers may reevaluate whether to retain microfilm holdings.

See Frequently Asked Questions: Digital Access Replacing Microfilms for more information.

About FamilySearch

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 5,000 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.