ISBGFH: Mini-Institute Aug 2018, Philadelphia

ISBGFHResearching Family in the British Isles

The Historical Society of Pennsylvania (HSP) has partnered with the International Society for British Genealogy and Family History (ISBGFH) to conduct a four day program of researching family in the British Isles. ISBGFH conducts the British Institute held annually in Salt Lake City to provide week-long education by well-known genealogists on the British Isles. From 13-16 August 2018, the ISBGFH has arranged for several presenters to provide an overview of researching British Isles topics at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. These presentations will explore DNA, Scotland, Ireland and England research. London based genetic genealogist Dr. Maurice Gleeson, MB, will present on DNA and Irish research, Christine Woodcock, from Genealogy Tours of Scotland, will discuss Scottish research, and Frank Southcott, President, ISBGFH, will explore the English records.

The HSP program is designed to be attended either on a given day and topic or in its entirety. It is an in-depth overview of British Isles research and enhances attendance for those who may desire to attend the British Institute where morning instruction and afternoon independent research are conducted in the LDS Family History Library in Salt Lake City on a country topic. More information about the British Institute is available HERE

The HSP curriculum for each day involves 4 presentations of one hour and fifteen minutes each. Monday, 13 August 2018, Dr Gleeson, MB, will explore advances made in DNA and how it can be applied to your British Isles research. Christine Woodcock will discuss the uniqueness of Scottish research on Tuesday, 14 August 2018. Dr. Gleeson will return on Wednesday, 15 August 2018, to present on the ever increasing resources available on Irish research, and Thursday, 16 August 2018, Frank Southcott, will examine English genealogical resources.

The cost of the four day program will be $299. Individual program days are available for $99 per day. Limited consultation slots will be available on DNA, Scotland and Ireland during the program for $125 hour.
Registration:
http://hsp.org/calendar/researching-family-british-isles


DNA Instructor: Dr Maurice GleesonMaurice Gleeson

  • An introduction to DNA testing for Genealogy
    This introductory talk will explain the basics of DNA testing, the three main types of test, how each one can be applied in practice (with examples), and which one is best for you to specifically address your genealogical conundrums.
  • Using Y-DNA to research your surname of choice
    Anyone can research any particular surname (i.e. family name) that they want – you just need to find the right cousin to test. Y-DNA is eminently suited to surname research because it follows the same path as hereditary surnames i.e. back along the father father father line. This talk explores surname DNA studies and what they can reveal about your surname
  • Applying autosomal DNA to your family history research – the theory
    The most popular of the DNA tests is the autosomal test. This can be used to research all of your ancestral lines (as opposed to Y-DNA and mitochondrial DNA which only help you explore a single ancestral line each). This talk explores the basic science behind autosomal DNA testing, the secrets to successfully applying it, and how it can be combined with other tests and genealogy to help answer specific genealogical questions.
  • Applying autosomal DNA to your family history research – the practice
    This is a more in-depth look at the use of autosomal DNA, including a step-by-step approach to tackling your matches, the concept of triangulation, the use of third party tools, and how techniques used to help adoptees trace their birth family can also help us to break thru our genealogical Brick Walls.

Scottish Genealogy Instructor Christine WoodcockChristine Woodcock

  • In Search of Your Scottish Ancestors: Search Your Roots; Discover Your Heritage
    While many people want to know more about their Scottish heritage, they don’t know where to begin. Fortunately, researching our Scottish ancestors is a fairly easy task. Knowing where to look is usually where we get tied up. This presentation will get you started in researching your Scottish ancestry as well as how to make the most of your research. Topics Include: starting your search, reaching out to others, ScotlandsPeople website, Scottish naming patterns, marriages and family history societies.
  • Breaking Through Brick Walls in Scottish Research
    Scottish documents contain a wealth of information and can make researching so much easier when you really take a look at what the documents are telling you. It becomes important to really pay attention to the key words on the documents so that you know what records you need to look at next in order to break through brick walls and learn as much as you can about your Scottish ancestors. In this presentation we will look at the key words on the documents that may help break down the brick wall. Then we will look at where those records exist and how you can access them.
  • Online and Offline Databases for Scottish Genealogy Research
    There comes a time when you have done all of the online researching you can do using the standard databases. In this presentation you will learn of the databases that aren’t as well know but that can assist in breaking through your brick walls. These include: websites for researching Scottish occupations, websites specific to the genealogy of regions where your ancestors might have lived, emigration databases, military databases, witchcraft databases, medieval ancestry, and British newspapers.
  • Military Men, Covenanters and Jacobites: Historic Events That Led to Mass Migration
    This session will help you understand the importance of the events in Scottish history that led to a large number of Scots leaving their homeland for life in the Americas. In order to be successful researching in the Scottish records, we need to know where in Scotland our ancestors originated. Bridging the gap between finding them in the North American records (birth, marriage, death and census records) and being able to locate them in the Scottish records may seem like a daunting task. However, it is often less of a challenge and more of a reward if you understand what brought them here in the first place. Some clues can be taken from the major historic events in Scottish history that led to Scots leaving their homeland.

Irish Research Instructor Dr Maurice Gleeson

Maurice Gleeson

 

  • Tracing Your Ancestors Back to Ireland
    For many Irish-Americans, all they know is their ancestor “came from Ireland” but they have no further information than that. This talk gives an overview of the various techniques & records available in the US (and elsewhere) that can be used to help trace your ancestor back to where they came from in Ireland. These include shipping records, emigration records, but also surname dictionaries and distribution maps.
  • Irish Church and Civil Registration Records
    In the last year or so, many of the civil registration records are coming online. Most of these are now available for free via http://www.irishgenealogy.ie and digital images of the original record can be downloaded. Civil registration started in 1864 for most records. Prior to this, one has to rely on church records for tracing further back and these can be very helpful indeed or not at all – coverage is patchy and most records peter out around 1800-1830. However, all of Ireland is covered by two websites and most of this research can be done from the comfort of your own home.
  • Census, Census Substitutes, and Land Records
    Census records survive for only 1901 and 1911, with some scraps from other years. Griffith’s Valuation can be very helpful as a mid-1800 census substitute but it is the Cancelled or Revised Valuation Books that provide a wealth of information that allow tracing relatives forward and backward from the present day to the 1850s. We will also look at the Tithe Applotment books and the Registry of Deeds.
  • Less Common Irish Genealogical Records
    This talk explores the wealth of genealogical material to be found in newspapers, cemeteries, probate, petty session court records, & dog licenses. We will also explore some of the resources that everyone should be using as a routine part of their ongoing Irish research.

English Research Instructor Frank Southcott
Frank Southcott

  • Researching Your Family in England: Census and National Registration
    A useful England census has been conducted every 10 years since 1841 and is accessible through 1911. It is the primary resource to establish families in England during that period. England also conducted a national registration in 1939 as an ancillary of WWII. Both of these resources will be explored during this session.
  • Researching Your Family in England: Civil Registration
    Civil registration of birth, marriages and deaths commenced on 1 July 1837. Explore the records and idiosyncrasies of the registration process in England and how to obtain the information for your family.
  • Researching Your Family in England: Wills and Church Records
    Wills survive from early times. Baptisms, marriages and burials survive in a great number of parishes from the mid-1500’s. This session will explore the available probate and church records and the wealth of information that can be derived.
  • Researching English Family at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania
    Many people are surprised at the vast collection of British Isles records available at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania library. Explore the records and resources available for British Isles family research at HSP with Daniel Rolph, PhD, Historian and Head of Reference Services.

Registration:
http://hsp.org/calendar/researching-family-british-isle

ARCHIVED: WACKY Wednesday – 11 Apr 2018

WACKYWednesdayPromo

We had too much to discuss during this week’s Mondays with Myrt, it spilled over into this episode of WACKY Wednesday.

 

SELECTED TEXT

00:28:09 True Lewis: YaY SHELLEY!!!!!!!!
00:28:28 Shelley Murphy: Hey there True!!!! and all…xoxo
00:28:35 Dustin Austin: Hey True!
00:28:43 True Lewis: Hello Dustin!—
00:28:52 Shelley Murphy: Hey there Melissa and Dustin!
00:28:58 Melissa Barker: Hello Everyone!
00:29:06 Dustin Austin: Hey Melissa and Shelly!! 🙂 🙂 🙂

Old letters
00:29:06 Cousin Russ: Denise Levenick https://thefamilycurator.com/ethics-etiquette-and-old-family-letters
00:30:27 True Lewis: I do have them….I have my own. I don’t think I’ll mind when I’m gone. I’ll be resting in peace.
00:31:00 Betty-Lu Burton: It depends. Are the people still alive? Are you reading them as part of history?
00:31:54 Diane minor: it depends. I have some letters my grandmother sent to her children when she was hospitalized after having a stillborn baby. they are painful to me to read and I feel very protective about sharing the contents.
00:32:54 Jody: found a suitcase full between my parents when dad was in korea during Vietnam war. parents read through them again recently and threw out a bunch. I probably should have just kept quiet about having them and brought them out when they were gone.
00:38:12 Betty-Lu Burton: Newsy letters that talk about family going ons yes I would share. Love letters would depend on what is in them
00:39:38 Betty-Lu Burton: It is beautiful
00:40:28 True Lewis: WoW! Oh My that was a treasure!
00:42:02 Diane minor: Good point Sadie.
00:44:58 Shelley Murphy: are those books behind you Russ as big as they look on the cam?
00:47:02 Shelley Murphy: oh my goodness!
00:47:43 True Lewis: She made a good point….We forget they were young once. My parents were very open as they got older.
00:47:45 Holly Hansen: I was able to fix up a system to digitize my audio tapes. It was pretty simple. I had an old karaoke machine and bought a $8.00 cord to hook it to my computer. You can do it easy Russ.
00:53:50 Shelley Murphy: that is what Thomas Jefferson did, he tracked all of his planting and the weather, etc.
00:55:34 True Lewis: I have a Ledger from a grocery clerk in early 1900’s for one of my Ancestors Dock Henry his account to J. O. Hixson.
00:57:17 Holly Hansen: The Multi-Media Centers does a great job. I send them all my old wire tapes too.
01:01:15 Shelley Murphy: It’s all about telling the stories!

DNA How to tell their story

May 12, 2018 – 8:30am to 5pm

Location: At the Jefferson School African American Heritage Center

233 4th St. NW, 2nd Floor, Charlottesville, VA

Presented by MAAGI Coordinators:

  • Bernice Bennett
  • Angela Walton-Raji
  • Shelley Murphy

https://familytreegirl.com/2018/04/08/dna-and-genealogy-how-to-tell-the-story-charlottesville-va/
http://jeffschoolheritagecenter.org

01:09:59 Cousin Russ: Mid-Western African American Genealogy Institute http://www.maagiinstitute.org
01:10:49 True Lewis: It took me a week to recover when I got home from MAAGI
01:12:42 Dustin Austin: GO Shelley, Bernice & Angela!
01:13:51 True Lewis: I had no idea you were going to be on Shelley! I just talked to you last night. lol. Parley made you forget to tell me. Glad I showed up.
01:14:57 True Lewis: This was a Awesome Wacky Wednesday.
01:17:07 Shelley Murphy: Thank you all!
01:17:21 Melissa Barker: Shelley! You are my HERO!
01:18:19 Shelley Murphy: Thank you Melissa!
01:19:57 Shelley Murphy: Thats amazing…
01:20:16 Cousin Russ: If you are have genealogy methodogy, DNA, technology or research questions, be sure to consult Katherine R. Willson’s Genealogy on Facebook listing of over 10,000+ groups and pages: https://socialmediagenealogy.com/genealogy-on-facebook-list/
01:21:23 Shelley Murphy: what a great resource

ethnicity
DearMYRTLE and Cousin Russ recognize the United Nations’ International Decade for People of African Descent 2015-2024. We reach out to _all_ regardless of race, color, creed, sexual orientation or national origin with support for researching family and documenting cultural inheritance.

01:23:19 Cousin Russ: WHERE are DearMYRTLE’s Webinars archived? At MYRT’S MUSINGS http://dearmyrtle.com/blog2/index.php/blog/
01:23:45 Shelley Murphy: True, yes…2x Grandfather Parley Worden is on my mine…I can’t wait to finish the argument!
01:26:35 Betty-Lu Burton: I am surprise the number of indexed records is as high as 30%
01:27:01 Cousin Russ: Robert Kehrer’s Search Indices Created from Images Sets https://youtu.be/WMTUZPcFJj0

01:27:11 Cousin Russ: Robert Kehrer’s Search from the FamilySearch Catalog https://youtu.be/AlX5SxI64wk REMEMBER he’s the Senior Product Manager for FamilySearch “SEARCH” and “HINTING”, so he ought to know.

01:27:19 Cousin Russ: Robert Kehrer’s Navigating Image Waypoints https://youtu.be/Nzg6rsBusk8

01:31:30 Shelley Murphy: Great being with you all tonight…
01:31:30 Susan Bleimehl: Thanks for a great evening.

 

 

 


FEE
This DearMYRTLE Event is presented at no cost. If you find the information useful, consider the Pay What You Want business model Ol’ Myrt employs: http://blog.dearmyrtle.com/2015/03/hangouts-pay-what-you-want.html


DearMYRTLE's Profile Pic
Myrt’s Musings

Here’s the link to DearMYRTLE’s Event Calendar – http://hangouts.dearmyrtle.com/calendar.html

Here’s the link to the GeneaWebinars Blog & Calendar of other genealogy webinars, chats and hangouts – http://blog.geneawebinars.com/p/calendar.html


 

ARCHIVED: GreekGen Study Group 1- Original Surname and Village of Origin

GreekGenStudyGroup

WEBINARS IN THIS SERIES

OUR INSTRUCTOR
Carol Kostakos Petranek is a frequent traveler to Greece. Carol serves as co-director of the Washington, DC Family History Center (in Kensington, Maryland). She also serves as a Citizen Archivist at the National Archives (US) and in the FamilySearch digitization project at the Maryland State Archives

 

SELECTED COMMENTS

01:26:58 Cousin Russ: Link to GreekGen Study Group Google Sheet – http://bit.ly/DM_GreekGen
Spartan Roots Blog.

01:30:41 Cousin Russ: Carol’s Spartan Roots blog https://spartanroots.wordpress.com
01:33:26 Cousin Russ: Handout: Introduction to Greek Research https://www.dropbox.com/s/tkmdav69jerqxu7/Handout%201%20-%20Getting%20Started.pdf?dl=0
01:40:25 Cousin Russ: Handout: Using US Records to Prepare for Research in Greece — https://www.dropbox.com/s/1dxtkjxxzh9mifp/Handout%202%20-%20Using%20US%20Records%20to%20Prepare%20for%20Research%20in%20Greece.pdf?dl=0

familysearch_largeSquare
01:41:39 Cousin Russ: FamilySearch Wiki: Greece – https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/Greece_Genealogy
01:42:34 Randi Patrick: Will we have access to this chat after the lecture?
01:43:30 Cousin Russ: The Chat will be posted on Myrt’s Blog when this Webinar is posted
01:43:51 Randi Patrick: OK. Thank you.
01:43:57 DearMYRTLE: The account at FamilySearch is FREE.

01:57:18 Patty Markos: Carol, you happen to be a cousin somehow. Lol You recently sent a request to my brother. You’re amazing, btw! 🙂

2018-04-13_8-55-10

01:58:50 Cousin Russ: Hellenic Genealogy Geek Facebook Page — https://www.facebook.com/groups/118224528189671/
02:00:59 Cousin Russ: Don – Both websites have details on how to do download & upload raw DNA data and your GEDcom file of genealogy data. There are a number of FB DNA Groups.
02:08:04 Karen Trearchis: I have a baptismal record like this for my Dad.

02:35:13 Randi Patrick: Thank you, Carol for your presentation. It was very informative. It not only helped with Greek research but other ethnicities as well.
02:36:10 Panagiotis Papoulidis: Wonderful session Carol….thank you so much!
02:36:27 Suzanne Adams: This was wonderful Carol. Thank you! Excited to hear more about records in Greece next time! 🙂
02:36:31 athnamayporter: My village is now located in Albania since 1955 or so.
02:36:59 Patty Markos: Thank you so much Carol. I’ve already received family records for my father and mother using your GAK link from you blog. Amazing!
02:37:07 Karen Trearchis: Thanks Carol, this webinar was wonderful! Pat, we will adopt you!
02:37:09 athnamayporter: Any help would be so very helpful.
02:37:31 stacey Spanos: thank you, wonderful will be back
02:38:53 Karen Trearchis: someone just mentioned a village in albania, my Papou grew up in Hochiste, Albania
02:40:05 athnamayporter: In Albania, my village is in Sopiki
02:40:13 Cousin Russ: Our conversation will continue here — https://plus.google.com/u/0/+DearmyrtlePage/posts/QSdZqomNxRd
02:40:44 Karen Trearchis: I think the village was near Korce.
02:41:25 Jackie Wilson: Thank you for doing this!!!!!
02:41:43 athnamayporter: Sopike is in the mountains. near the boarder of Greece.


FEE
This DearMYRTLE Event is presented at no cost. If you find the information useful, consider the Pay What You Want business model Ol’ Myrt employs: http://blog.dearmyrtle.com/2015/03/hangouts-pay-what-you-want.html


DearMYRTLE's Profile Pic

Myrt’s Musings

Here’s the link to DearMYRTLE’s Event Calendar – http://hangouts.dearmyrtle.com/calendar.html

Here’s the link to the GeneaWebinars Blog & Calendar of other genealogy webinars, chats and hangouts – http://blog.geneawebinars.com/p/calendar.html