ARCHIVED: Mondays with Myrt – 21 May 2018

MondaysWithMyrt

This practical advice for family historians include:

  • DNA tests
  • DNA reference groups
  • The British Institute
  • AmericanAncestors
  • Virginia History of History and Culture
  • genealogy society insurance
  • GDPR
  • Research Like a Pro eBook from Family Locket
  • Rhode Island Military Records books on eBay

SELECTED COMMENTS

09:49:38 From Dave Robison: Just want to brag a bit. WMGS is slowly approaching 200 members and at CSG, we held our 50th anniversary “celebration” last Saturday.
09:54:11 From Molly to All panelists : I don’t have a camera any more since Hurricane Irma.
10:00:01 From John Laws : Hi Everyone. How ya doing?
10:00:22 From Sheryl Whisenhunt : Good Morning to all.
10:00:44 From Melinda Culpon : Howdy from Texas!
10:00:58 From June Butka : Doing well, John. Love e seeing your garden photos.
10:02:22 From Merlin : Hello from Wisconsin–raining this AM, again.
10:03:14 From Liv Birgit : Hello from France. Had some trouble joining, it was all in French.
10:03:17 From Hilary Gadsby : No significant rain here for a while now
10:05:51 From Molly : Arkansas is like a black hole in the older records.
10:07:21 From Bill West : Goood morning! Finally here from sunny Massachusetts
10:07:39 From Randy Seaver : there are some free databases at AmericanAncestors but you need a guest account
10:07:49 From Cousin Russ : NEHGS https://www.americanancestors.org/index.aspx
10:08:01 From Molly : You can have some of our Florida rain…it has rained for 2 weeks now.
10:08:08 From Randy Seaver : AA has probate packets now for several counties – original records!

10:10:29 From Dave Robison : We recently had a Welsh research presentation from Susan Sit at WMGS. Part of her presentation included pronouncing the name of that town with far too many consonants. She also pronounced the LL for us1
10:11:03 From Randy Seaver : how do you pronounce the double L?
10:12:50 From SMurphy : I hear Lincolnshire or Lancashire the same, based on sound?
10:13:28 From Marian Koalski : If you put the tip of your tongue against the roof of your mouth and blow air out the “sides” of your tongue it makes the sound. Some people call it a lateral lisp.
10:14:19 From Pat Kuhn : Delaware has the Hundreds also
10:14:57 From Melinda Culpon : similar to our counties in the US – my UK ancestors are from West Riding
10:15:27 From Cousin Russ : 2018 British Institute https://isbgfh.org/cpage.php?pt=56

10:24:15 From Dave Robison : For detailed Bassett Family info, see http://www.bassettbranches.org/
10:25:22 From Dave Robison : Click the “Splinters from the tree” to view newsletters that have been published monthly since 2014
10:25:29 From deecoz : Russ, when you say “validate” what do you mean? Confirming their lines as well as yours? or more?
10:25:57 From Cousin Russ : Validate – DNA Matches my Paper Trail
10:28:16 From Rebecca: SMyrphy: Lincolnshire or Lancashire? Are you referring to pronunciation or geography. Lincoln is the major city in Lincolnshire East of Sheffield; and Lancaster is the major city in Lancashire Northwest of Manchester. I have a time with British English too.
10:28:28 From Debra : I manage over 40 kits and have had fanatistic results with the matching. Only one was a NPE, I have found relatives for 5 NPEs. I’ve tested at all of the top companies.

10:30:11 From Cousin Russ : Laws Family Register http://lawsandlawes.blogspot.com/
10:31:13 From SMurphy : I have tested with all of the companies. Now waiting for the results from Living DNA. I manage 7 kits. My ancestry is Great Britian-Lancashire

10:34:53 From deecoz : We go from birthing descendants to hunting ancestors!
10:35:06 From Robbin Smith : hello finally found a link that worked!

10:36:18 From Dave Robison : I can vouch for Randy’s New England origins as he pronounced “Leominster” correctly!!
10:38:22 From SMurphy : From AncestryDNA I am 25% Europe West, 16% Ireland/Scotland/Wales, 5% Scandinavia,
10:38:23 From Randy Seaver : My DNA comparison is https://www.geneamusings.com/2017/05/comparison-of-my-autosomal-dna.html
10:38:27 From Robbin Smith : me either
10:38:33 From Cousin Russ : My DNA comparison is https://www.geneamusings.com/2017/05/comparison-of-my-autosomal-dna.html
10:38:46 From jacquelinewilson : I have tested at 3 companies and have the kit for LivingDNA (FtDNA=MtDNA way back when + 23&ME + Ancestry). I have 1 person with a match of 684cM and 5 others in the 300 range. Unfortunately, the person with the highest DNA match has not answered my Ancestry message.

10:41:31 From Randy Seaver : I just received a first cousin 1x removed on MyHeritage (I know who she is), and now have 1 first cousin (AncestryDNA), 1 firast cousin 1x removed (MyHeritage), 2 first cousins 2x removed (Ancestry), 2 first cousin 2x removed (MyHeritage) and 1 2nd cousin (Ancestry).

10:44:04 From Cousin Russ : DearMYRTLE’s Genealogy Community on Google+ Plus: http://bit.ly/DearMYRTLEonGoogle
10:44:14 From Cousin Russ : DearMYRTLE’s Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/DearMYRTLE/
10:44:27 From Cousin Russ : GeneaWebinars — http://geneawebinars.com/
10:44:40 From Cousin Russ : DearMYRTLE’s Calendar http://dearmyrtle.com/blog2/index.php/calendar/
10:47:00 From June Butka : Randy. where in New Hampshire?
10:47:42 From Randy Seaver : Salem NH
10:48:06 From SMurphy : Now myHeritage percentages are off compared to the others.
10:48:07 From June Butka : Wow very close to where I live.
10:50:20 From cyndy : The testing companies tests are slightly different so expect to see differences in estimates
10:50:36 From SMurphy : I expected them to be the same or close.
10:51:12 From June Butka: I expect different DNA results from each company.
10:51:25 From Randy Seaver : June, I’ll come visit you the next time I visit Salem. don’t hold your breath, though – no trips planned for foreseeable future because of Linda’s health.
10:51:36 From Bill West : I have mostly English ancestors but Ancestry says I have 25% Scandinavian ethnicity . Those Vikings really got around.
10:51:42 From Robbin Smith : me too .1% ashkenzai
10:51:51 From Robbin Smith : on 23andMe
10:52:29 From Robbin Smith : I expect them to be pretty much the same
10:52:49 From Hilary Gadsby : The British Isles had a lot of invasions so going to have same DNA as other Europeans
10:53:07 From SMurphy : I have tested with Ancestry, 23andme, myHeritage, National genographic, Living DNA (waiting for results)
10:54:14 From June Butka : Always welcome anytime, Randy. We still need that paper trail cousin match. I haven’t seen you as a DNA match to you on my sites. not surprised because of our distant cousin relationship.
10:54:22 From Randy Seaver : dropping their seed all over England but not Scotland, right?
10:54:27 From Marcia Philbrick : DNA — Recent discussion in a FB group about ethnicity. The poster had paper genealogy going back to Scotland / Ireland while ethnicity had high % Scandinavian but very little Scottish / Irish. My DNA is similar – 17% Scandinavian while paper strongly points to Scotland.
10:54:32 From jacquelinewilson : My ethnicity results prove the family story that my birth father is from Greece (or there about).


10:54:45 From Cousin Russ : GRANT CLUB MEDAL https://www.virginiahistory.org/collections-and-resources/virginia-history-explorer-old/getting-message-out-presidential-campaign-0
10:58:34 From Bill West : There were Viking settlements in Northern Scotland and the islands near there, so chances are good they left children there, too.
10:59:41 From SMurphy : Thank you Dave…for speaking with Coy B. Appreciate it.

GDPRGeneral Data Protection Regulation (EU)
11:01:16 From Randy Seaver : what liability are you trying to guard against?
11:01:31 From Marcia Philbrick : Is FGS the best place for a society to find info on dealing with GDPR?
11:04:36 From Cousin Russ : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Data_Protection_Regulation
11:04:44 From Cousin Russ : https://fgs.org
11:05:02 From jacquelinewilson : Several small companies are now going out of business like Mitosearch because of GDPR! BOO HOO!
11:05:16 From Cousin Russ : https://www.legalgenealogist.com/2018/05/21/the-gdpr-you-me/
11:05:36 From Cousin Russ : https://www.legalgenealogist.com/2018/05/20/the-casualties-of-gdpr/
11:06:44 From Robbin Smith : good point about instituional knowledge
11:08:21 From Marian Koalski : Dave Robison, do you have a How-To-Be-President document (etc. for sec, treasurer, program chair…)?
11:08:58 From Marian Koalski : My husband started one for our square-dance club, and it was revolutionary.
11:09:26 From Hilary Gadsby : This is from UK ICO https://iconewsblog.org.uk/2017/08/09/gdpr-sorting-the-fact-from-the-fiction/
11:11:33 From Hilary Gadsby : Issuing fines has always been and will continue to be, a last resort. Last year (2016/2017) we concluded 17,300 cases. I can tell you that 16 of them resulted in fines for the organisations concerned
11:11:37 From Marcia Philbrick : I’ve been reading the WordPress.com forum and there are quite a few posts where people are taking down their blogs. WordPress.com is working to make their service compliant. Blogger is also working to become compliant.
11:11:56 From jacquelinewilson : I am getting my re-verify notice from the bloggers themselves rather than mail chimp et
11:12:19 From Marcia Philbrick : Blog issues include ‘Cookies’, Comments (registering with an email address) and a privacy page (possibly more)
11:12:46 From Hilary Gadsby : I have seen from official ICO that resubscription is not necessary
11:13:06 From Melinda Culpon : Shouldn’t sites like Feedly have to send confirmation to blogs again? [NOTE: Feedly is cloud based, and you must go there to read the blog posts you’ve added to your Feedly list.]
11:13:55 From Molly : It is any website. Our church shares links to Facebook and Youtube. Those things have cookies on your site.
11:13:59 From June Butka : I may need to rethink my blog. I wasn’t aware of this.
11:14:14 From Marcia Philbrick : John Laws’ comment about privacy and birth makes me wonder about RootsMagic websites. I have a RootsMagic site but haven’t investigated this yet.
11:14:57 From Marcia Philbrick : My blog post about my blog and GDPR – http://heartlandgenealogy.blogspot.com/2018/05/challenge-of-gdpr.html
11:17:25 From Randy Seaver : the bottom line is that all Internet users/content providers may be at the mercy of the folks who want the right “to be unknown.” Arggghhhh. Stupidity IMHO.
11:17:27 From Marcia Philbrick : One of my major concerns is how to advise our local historical society. They have members and research requests from Europe.
11:18:27 From Molly : It is mostly you must assure your readers that you are not a threat to them. Make your policies and privacy totally open and truthful, with ablility for the ready to op-out of your site’s collection of informaton.
11:19:22 From Marian Koalski : Actually, these protections are what US residents should want for themselves. Don’t you mind when your contact info gets sold or given to some other party? If first happened to me with an email prayer list from church.
11:21:15 From Randy Seaver : My hope is that Blogger and Feedburner and Feedly, as content providers, will provide a means to deal with GDPR, similar to what Marcia put on her blog.
11:21:43 From Robbin Smith to All panelists : zoom handles the subscriptions they have the data; therefore they are responsible for compliance.
11:21:46 From Randy Seaver : Frankly, this is restriction of freedom of speech – the First Amendment in the USA.
11:22:05 From Cousin Russ : https://www.legalgenealogist.com/privacy-policy/
11:23:59 From Robbin Smith to All panelists : whomever controls the data is to be compliance
11:24:01 From Molly : I would put up a privacy statement anyway to be sure.
11:24:28 From Marcia Philbrick : WordPress (and probably Blogger) is working on tools for users that will help keep the blogs compliant. One tool WordPress is working on is the ability to remove user info.
11:26:49 From Marcia Philbrick : Google Analytics and other tools collect user info to generate site statistics. These are probably impacted by GDPR.
11:26:56 From Robbin Smith to All panelists : blogs are a website
11:27:10 From Molly : If you can access it on the www it is a website.
11:27:42 From dcarlile : It doesn’t matter if it is a website or blog, you cannot collect the info without their permission and only for uses they approve. Our society email newsletter applies.
11:28:07 From Randy Seaver : so what information on a genealogy blog wouild violate the privacy protections that GDPR supposedly will enforce?
11:28:49 From Cousin Russ : WP GDPR https://wordpress.org/plugins/wp-gdpr-compliance/
11:29:15 From Bill West : Oy, I’m getting a headache trying to figure out how this will effect me.
11:29:34 From Robbin Smith to All panelists : the “data collector” is the one responsible for compliance
11:29:46 From Yvonne Demoskoff : Is it correct to say that if someone from the EU visits my blog to read, but not comment or sign up for email posts, then as a blogger I haven’t anything to worry about the GDPR?
11:29:51 From dcarlile : If their name is in the comments on the blog, it shows u pon our blogsite for everyone to see.
11:30:55 From jacquelinewilson : Russ, do you have access to the email addy? If you do, then it applies – based on my reading on the subject.
11:30:58 From Molly : Some of the hosting sites are trying to make their hosting compliant also. I got an email from mine that they are working on solutions also.
11:31:07 From Robbin Smith to All panelists : google analytics would be the data collector
11:31:20 From Marcia Philbrick : The commenting feature is the one that I’m most concerned about right now since I require users to give me their name and email address to comment.
11:32:09 From Robbin Smith to All panelists : yes that would be you being the data collector
11:32:59 From Randy Seaver : so we could stop posting comments to avoid a potential violation
11:34:33 From SMurphy : It is so sad that we are discussing this and there are people that want to do harm to others….so will we see the info on the posters making comments on my blog the way they see it?
11:34:54 From Robbin Smith : You can’t collect and store any personal data without having obtained, and being able to document that you obtained, consent from the persons you’re collecting data from. You can, however, collect and store personal data in your server logs for the limited and legitimate purpose of detecting and preventing fraud and unauthorized system access, and ensuring the security of your systems.
11:35:21 From Molly : I have considered stopping any comments. That would be the only way that I collect emails.
11:35:35 From Randy Seaver : Would a potential violation on my blog would be mentioning a living European person? Or having access to a living European person’s birthdate or address or email and publishing it?
11:36:19 From dcarlile : Cookies track where else you go on the interent and send that info back to teh website.
11:36:21 From Robbin Smith  : saving cookies generally allows you to ease of re_accessing the site
11:37:07 From Marian Koalski : Randy — excellent question!
11:37:14 From SMurphy : Good question Randy!
11:37:31 From Marian Koalski : Call me 007.
11:37:35 From Debra : Has the US agreed to this, as it covers Us cititzens and our laws. [ NOTE: This is a European Union directive.]
11:38:48 From Molly : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Data_Protection_Regulation
11:39:53 From dcarlile : It applies to EU citizens regardless of where the information is stored in the world. If you have EU customers than you have to comly with the law. If you only have US cutomers, it does not apply to you, until EU person signs up for something, buys something from you, etc. As I understand the law.
11:40:01 From Marcia Philbrick : EU GDPR portal – https://www.eugdrp.org
11:40:16 From Randy Seaver : Is information about dead people in a blogp ost or an online tree subject to GDPR? Do dead people have rights in Europe? They don’t in the USA.
11:41:05 From Randy Seaver : If I have a living person in my private RootsMagic tree or private Ancestry tree, am I subject to GDPR?
11:41:07 From Molly : If we can provide proof of privacy policies we should be fairly safe.
11:41:37 From Cousin Russ : Welcome to gdpr-info.eu. Here you can find the official PDF of the Regulation (EU) 2016/679 (General Data Protection Regulation) as a neatly arranged website. All Articles of the GDPR are linked with suitable recitals. http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:32016R0679
11:42:06 From Debra : Seems like it would be part of the International Trade Laws and how each country interacts or agrees to participate in such agreements. Seems like a real invasion trying to over rule people in other countries.
11:42:30 From Randy Seaver : There are many online genealogy databases that have info about living persons. Will those be removed by Ancestry, FamilySearch, MyHeritage, FMP, etc?
11:43:13 From Randy Seaver : Power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely.
11:43:49 From dcarlile : People can opt-in – agree to sign up, what you use, etc. I have been receiving these emails all week requiring me to say yes, I want to continue receiving whatever it is.
11:44:23 From Hilary Gadsby : WikiTree is making anyone who may be living unlisted in order to ensure they comply. Unless that person is a registered member.
11:44:57 From Molly : It has to be people in the European Union who access your site. Not US citizens.


11:45:19 From Marcia Philbrick : yDNA surname projects are being affected by GDPR. Based on the project I participate in, FTDNA is moving the projects. There is a new setting on the sharing and privacy part of my account that affects the sharing of my DNA data with the project. I had to go in and ‘opt in’ to continue sharing my DNA data with the project.

11:45:55 From Bill West : What about obituraries that list names of survivors?i
11:45:58 From jacquelinewilson : Doesn’t SSA chains & applications redact info on living people?
11:46:21 From dcarlile : These are all United States records which do not fall under the GDPR. [NOTE: GDPR affects any website that presents information.]
11:47:01 From Yvonne Demoskoff : I just received an email from Virtual Genealogical Society letting me know that I need to confirm that I’d like to receive content from them. But I live in Canada
11:47:10 From Randy Seaver : what about EU citizens who reside in the USA? Or Canada, or wherever?
11:48:04 From Hilary Gadsby : We should be careful with information we hold for living and recently deceased persons wherever they live.
11:48:17 From Randy Seaver : Will newspapers and TV stations not be able to mention the names of criminals or witness names?
THE_GenealogyShow
11:49:53 From Cousin Russ : THE Genealogy Show https://www.facebook.com/THEGenShow2019/posts/792012904329992
11:50:16 From Cousin Russ : Judy Russell, The Legal Genealogist https://www.legalgenealogist.com/2018/05/20/the-casualties-of-gdpr

DearMYRTLE's WACKY Wednesday Logo
11:50:28 From Cousin Russ : ARCHIVED: WACKY Wednesday “Online Searches – How do you approach a web site?” http://dearmyrtle.com/blog2/index.php/2018/05/18/archived-wacky-wednesday-online-searches-how-do-you-approach-a-web-site/

FamilySearch_CHOOSING

IMAGE: Screen shot from FamilySearch blog

11:50:57 From Cousin Russ : “When an archivist opened a book in the room, the termites just scurried out trying to find a hole to hide in.” –David Ouimette, FamilySearch Content Strategist. https://media.familysearch.org/familysearch-strategy-to-help-preserve-the-worlds-archives/

RandySeaver-Ancestry_databaseID

IMAGE: Randy Seaver explains how to search by Ancestry’s Database ID number.

11:50:58 From Randy Seaver : Blog post about updated Ancestry Hint Mining by collection is at https://www.geneamusings.com/2018/05/changes-to-mining-ancestrycom-hints-by.html
ResearchLikeAPro
11:51:12 From Cousin Russ : Research Like a Pro eBook http://familylocket.com/research-like-a-pro-ebook-sale-1-99-starts-sunday/
11:51:20 From jacquelinewilson : I just bought it!

11:52:07 From Cousin Russ : Rhode Island military records https://www.facebook.com/confusethedead/posts/10155634258913526
11:54:09 From SMurphy : Enjoy the rest of your day!


DearMYRTLE's Profile Pic
Myrt’s Musings

Here’s the link to DearMYRTLE’s Event Calendar – http://hangouts.dearmyrtle.com/calendar.html

Here’s the link to the GeneaWebinars Blog & Calendar of other genealogy webinars, chats and hangouts – http://blog.geneawebinars.com/p/calendar.html


 

 

 

ARCHIVED: Mondays with Myrt 14 May 2018

MondaysWithMyrt

After 3 weeks hiatus, we discussed

  • Pat Kuhn’s collaboration including family photos
  • The Virtual Genealogy Society
  • THE Genealogy Show 2019 in Birmingham at the NEC
  • Family Tree LIVE in April 2019 in London at the Alexandra Palace
  • Randy Seaver’s mother’s high school records
  • The Ancestry search problem announcement
  • The 23andMe vs. Ancestry lawsuit
  • Thomas Jones 150 years of probate and and Elizabeth Shown Mills 20104 soldiers in the same unit – to identify men with the same name
  • Desktop family tree software vs. online trees
  • Prioritizing which genealogy conference, show, institute or classes to attend

 SELECTED COMMENTS

00:56:19 Bill West: Goood morning from not quite sunny southeastern Massachusetts!
ethnicity
00:57:01 Cousin Russ: DearMYRTLE and Cousin Russ recognize the United Nations’ International Decade for People of African Descent 2015-2024. We reach out to _all_ regardless of race, color, creed, sexual orientation or national origin with support for researching family and documenting cultural inheritance.
Professional Genealogy PPS
00:58:21 Melinda Culpon: Professional Genealogy: Preparation, Practice & Standards – Elizabeth Shown Mills
01:10:22 Cousin Russ: https://www.amazon.com/Professional-Genealogy-Preparation-Practice-Standards/dp/0806320729

Virtual Genealogy Society
01:10:39 Jacqueline Wilson: I just signed up for that!
01:10:47 Cousin Russ: https://virtualgensoc.com/
01:11:01 Randy Seaver: I joined too
01:11:54 Yvonne Demoskoff: I joined too, Randy; looking forward to it.

THE_GenealogyShow
01:12:18 Cousin Russ: http://www.thegenealogyshow.uk/
01:12:33 Randy Seaver: I think I read that VGS webinars would be available to members for 6 months after the live talk.
01:13:50 Dave Robison: I would like to suggest that any purchases made at Amazon, use the URL http://www.smile.amazon.com. You’ll still sign into your own account but a small % of every purchase will be given to the charity of your choice.

Family Tree LIVE 2019
01:15:29 Cousin Russ: https://www.family-tree.co.uk/news-and-views/new-uk-family-history-show-family-tree-live
01:17:04 Randy Seaver: so we all could have a two month visit to the UK and go to both of them. Maybe someone could sponsor a genealogy cruise in between the two conferences.
01:17:52 Liv Christensen: I hope to go with a group of Norwegian genealogists.
01:18:31 Cousin Russ: Betty Carringer’s School Records https://www.geneamusings.com/2018/05/treasure-chest-tuesday-betty-carringers.html
01:18:56 Hilary Gadsby: Would be great to meet you again Liv
01:19:04 Melinda Culpon: Trying to get my Brummie friend to meet me in Birmingham next year.
01:19:45 Hilary Gadsby: That would be great Melinda
01:19:49 Dave Robison: The Museum of Springfield History and Archives has a massive collection of school records from all Springfield, Mass schools from about 1895 to 1940.
01:23:05 Pat Kuhn: had Latin 1 year, hated it!!!
01:23:48 Hilary Gadsby: I have some of my mother’s reports
01:24:21 Jacqueline Wilson: Random acts of kindness!
01:24:26 Pat Kuhn: I have one for my mother and one for my father


01:25:17 Randy Seaver: https://www.geneamusings.com/2018/05/ancestrycom-says-they-will-work-on.html
01:27:42 Yvonne Demoskoff: One of the issues I’ve had lately with Ancestry is when I search for someone I get very few (say only a dozen or so) results. I used to get 100s before this problem came up.
01:29:39 Yvonne Demoskoff: And the results or matches aren’t any more relevant than they used to be.
01:31:31 Molly McKinley: Great advice.
01:32:52 Jacqueline Wilson: The book [ProfGen: PPS] is out of stock & will be available on May 16! It sold out!!!!!
01:36:02 Robbin Smith: Mine is being delivered today
01:38:52 Robbin Smith: I dislike those kinds of “photos” too
01:42:44 Shelley Murphy: yes

Regarding 23&Me lawsuit against AncestryDNA, DearMYRTLE recommends joining Blaine Bettinger’s Genetic Genealogy Tips and Techniques Facebook Group. There is simply no way to independently create the information he provides there.

01:43:17 Shelley Murphy: I believe it’s a very valid point
01:43:24 Robbin Smith: ok by me

parabon-snapshot-genetic-genealogy-dna-analysis-service

Forensic Genealogist CeCe Moore partnered with a company to work with law enforcement.
01:43:45 Shelley Murphy: CeCe opened another company
01:43:54 Karen Trearchis: I think it was a good use to the database. I am glad they caught the man.
01:45:15 Rebecca Williams: My opinion: If you put your information on an open public website, then you shouldn’t be upset. Law enforcement has used DNA since around 1988.
01:45:36 Shelley Murphy: she posted on Facebook about it
01:46:33 Robbin Smith: I agree with Rebecca
01:46:52 Robbin Smith: i would object if they got the DNA match thru the private companies
01:47:01 Jacqueline Wilson: I am sooooo sorry to hear about your family member. Hoping for a quick recovery
01:47:32 Randy Seaver: Parabonhttps://www.parabon-nanolabs.com/nanolabs/news-events/2018/05/parabon-snapshot-genetic-genealogy-dna-analysis-service.html
01:47:37 Jacqueline Wilson: Yeah for decluttering!!!
01:47:40 Linda Stufflebean: My son was born in CA in 1988 – yesterday I saw a story online that CA has taken DNA swabs from infants born there since 1983 and parents were told. I don’t ever remember hearing about it and the DNA is stored in a database.
01:47:54 Karen Trearchis: I am very sorry to learn about your family member.
01:54:35 Jacqueline Wilson: It was live-streamed, so I got to see it!
02:00:19 Jacqueline Wilson: Will Legacy talk to Ancestry? NOTE: Family Tree Maker and RootsMagic are the only programs that can perform a data/image sync between an Ancestry Member Tree and the desktop version of the software programs. Legacy can indicate hints for various websites.

02:00:43 Bill West: Being paranoid, I keep a RM database on my computer in case I lose internet access. And I keep online trees in case my hard drive goes kaput.
02:02:38 Randy Seaver: The most pertinent article I’ve written about having genealogy software vs. online trees is probably at https://www.geneamusings.com/2015/11/dear-randy-why-buy-genealogy-software.html
02:05:24 Randy Seaver: Jacqueline, Legacy Family Tree will be able to talk to your MyHeritage tree soon. Gilad’s webinar last week was excellent.
02:07:18 Hilary Gadsby: I have several programs on my PC but that is because I like different features from each of them. My main program does not sync with any online tree but does find hints if I want them.

Deciding to go to a genealogy class, conference or institute is based on the following factors, different for each individual.

  • Proximity to one’s residence
  • Time of year with regard to family and work requirements
  • Proximity to an ancestral place of research
  • RootsTech (go there at least once)
  • Institutes offer a week of instructor-led course study, frequently with homework,

02:14:08 Hilary Gadsby: I have decided not to go to RootsTech next year as I am expecting to meet up with many of them in the UK events. I may go in 2020 however. I am going to Guild conference as well next year as it is 40th anniversary and in an area where I can stay and do research.
02:14:40 Hilary Gadsby: By them I mean friends.
02:15:07 Melinda Culpon: In my opinion I think those of you who were “covering” the conference had a different experience than just attending RootsTech. But yes I am more of a student
02:16:28 Randy Seaver: My time balance also includes the life situations I have – my Linda has mobility and memory problems and it’s hard to find things for her to do. Parties at the conference now become a feature.
02:16:48 Hilary Gadsby: I have attended RootsTech twice and had similar experience although slightly busier this last time.
02:16:49 Yvonne Demoskoff: I went to my first NGS conference in 2013 because of the quality of speakers, in particular ESM and Thomas Jones.
02:18:50 Randy Seaver: When we went to NGS and FGS in past years, I tried to also visit genealogy repositories and ancestry places
02:19:13 Cathy Naborowski: RootsTech is just too big for me. I like the size of NGS. But everyone should do RootsTech at least once.
02:20:57 Jacqueline Wilson: Randy: Hostler?
02:23:16 Randy Seaver: Jackie – maybe. At the Inn, he managed the horses – watering, feeding, cooling, washing, hitching up, etc. At 15 years old. He ended up being a horse trader later inl ife.
02:23:44 Karen Trearchis: I attend NERGC, New England Regional Genealogical conference.every 2 years & have been going since 2005. I love the excitement, the vending hall, work at our society’s booth. attending workshops in the Vendor Hall & classes. I went to FGS Springfield, Ill. I attended the great classes for society building! Love it and attended classes and enjoyed visiting an area I never been before. I am going to attend FGS19 in Washington,DC. My son is now living in Alexandria, VA. I want to go to the National Archives, too. So far I have not been able to go to Rootstech because of the expense, from the east coast, hotels,food. Maybe someday.
02:24:18 Hilary Gadsby: We call them Ostler in England
02:25:04 Randy Seaver: Hilary: I didn’t know that! Some of my Vaux relatives in Somerset married Ostler.
02:26:20 Jacqueline Wilson: I sometimes pick the conference I go to by location – if it is someplace I have never been before – just so I can play tourist.
02:26:44 Cousin Russ: The conversation continues — https://plus.google.com/u/0/+DearmyrtlePage/posts/7h4UxuPC1Wk
02:26:45 Hilary Gadsby: My husband has an Ostler in Norwich.
02:27:54 Jacqueline Wilson: Thank you for doing this!!!!!


DearMYRTLE's Profile Pic
Myrt’s Musings

Here’s the link to DearMYRTLE’s Event Calendar – http://hangouts.dearmyrtle.com/calendar.html

Here’s the link to the GeneaWebinars Blog & Calendar of other genealogy webinars, chats and hangouts – http://blog.geneawebinars.com/p/calendar.html


 

ARCHIVED: Mondays with Myrt – 23 Apr 2018

MondaysWithMyrt

So many changes, so little time. We did our best to cover the high spots including:

  • National Society Sons of the American Revolution
  • National Society Daughters of the American Revolution
  • Maureen Taylor, the Photo Detective
  • Types of corrections being made during the WikiTree Clean-a-Thon
  • FamilySearch Tree & WikiTree comparison
  • #Ancestry.com leaf hints “no longer available” [probably due to contracts expiring? They no longer have PERSI, and FindMyPast has the contract to display PERSI.
  • Did #Ancestry fire the entire IT department?
  • Frustrations with hints that lead to online trees, say at #MyHeritage. [Suggestion from Ol’ Myrt: How about providing options to toggle Smart Matches (trees) and Record Matches (documents) on/off. ]
  • DNA, DNA Painter
  • and much more!

SELECTED TEXT

10:00:58 From Melissa Barker : Hello Everyone! Listening in from the Houston County, TN. Archives.
10:01:13 From Bill West : Goooooood morning from sunny southeastern Massachusetts!

SAR
10:03:53 From Cousin Russ : https://www.sar.org/  See also apps, manuals, fees, etc: http://www.massar.org/membership/forms/

DAR2
10:04:03 From Cousin Russ : https://www.dar.org/ See also “How to join” https://www.dar.org/national-society/become-member/how-join

10:06:13 From June Butka : I have several Rev. War Patriots, however none in the DAR or SAR are for my Line. I believe I now can join. with the information I collected for my Mayflower line.
10:08:20 From marian koalski : Ditto in Massachusetts, John!
10:08:31 From Dawn Carlile : It is definitely spring in Oregon!
10:08:40 From Janine Edmée Hakim : Snow testerday, sun sun sun today…so far in Upstate NY
10:09:00 From Randy Seaver : spring in San Diego area – was gray this morning, but clearing off now.
10:09:14 From Melinda Culpon to All panelists : beautiful spring NOT HUMID day in Houston

MaureenTaylor

10:10:59 From DearMYRTLE to All panelists : Maureen Taylor, the Photo Detective https://maureentaylor.com/
10:11:48 From Mary Lou Gravatt : I read recently even if you are not going to a society to do an app as great research tool.

WikiTree2017

10:12:09 From Cousin Russ : WikiTree https://www.wikitree.com/
2018 Family History Expo original virtual

10:13:06 From Holly Hansen : 2018 International Family History Expo https://familyhistoryexpos.com/viewevent/index/190
10:13:55 From June Butka : I have several Rev. War Patriots, however none in the DAR or SAR are for my Line. I believe I now can join. with the information I collected for my Mayflower line.
10:17:35 From Holly Hansen : https://familyhistoryexpos.com/calldescriptions/index/190
10:19:14 From Shelley Murphy : June, if you need any help with DAR, let me know.
10:21:16 From June Butka : I’ll wait.
10:21:45 From June Butka : Mine were. They are registered, not just my line.
10:21:47 From Sheri Fenley : June – proving a new patriot is a very good thing! Need to prove service and residence
10:22:13 From June Butka : thank you all for the help offer.
10:22:41 From Rachel Evans : I have several options to join DAR with but I want to enter under a female ancestor who nursed her brother and another man wounded in service.
10:24:01 From Sheri Fenley : Excellent idea!

10:25:59 From June Butka : Both Ancestry and Family Search were slow and needed to be refreshed.

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: Sunday is always a big research day at FamilySearch. I don’t even venture out there if I can help it.

10:26:03 From Sheri Fenley : Wow I was on ancestry.com this morning and had no problems
10:26:29 From Melinda Culpon : Has anyone else see the doubling of middle names on ancestry recently?
10:26:57 From Valerie Lisk : Last night I did a Google search and was directed to 6 records on #Ancestry that did not show up on my Ancestry search.
10:27:04 From Roxanne Cummings Basey : I have experienced searches being faulty. I found an ancestor by searching a child but there he was under the name I had previously searched very clealy. He didn’t show up when I searched by his name. This type of thing has happened often.
10:27:11 From marian koalski : Is the slowness appearing in Ancestry’s record searches or only on the DNA connection databases?
10:27:12 From June Butka : I’ve seen mutliple listing of records I knew only had one entry by me on my tree.
10:27:17 From Janine Edmée Hakim : I have a “devil of a time” trying to add to/edit information on records
10:27:49 From Melinda Culpon : Record searches for me Mariann.
10:28:08 From Roxanne Cummings Basey : I don’t trust ancestry search results anymore.
10:29:24 From Roxanne Cummings Basey : Is there any way to do a joint complaint?
10:29:45 From June Butka : Russ, when you said June, did you mean I’m updating my database?
10:29:47 From Roxanne Cummings Basey : Speed is not the problem for me.
10:30:04 From Cousin Russ to June Butka : Yes you, June
10:30:12 From Deb Andrew : I had all three problems mentioned. My computer is the lastest and greatest you can have, high internet speed and band width.
10:30:34 From Bill West : I have had a hint leat for my great grandfather for a database that is no longer available. The leaf has been there for almost a year and I can’t remove it because the database isn’t available. Grrr.
10:31:57 From Deb Andrew : When, dh talked to him last week (he is in the tech industry) they told him, #Ancestry had fired their whole IT tech team.
10:33:43 From Randy Seaver : Deb, who did your did you talk to? At Ancestry? Fired IT team? wow.

10:34:43 From Dawn Carlile : Fold3 has many errors in their indexed records and I probably put in 80-100 corrections one evening and it was mainly that they did not sync with the images or the wrong info was typed, not that they couldn’t read they record. It was for WWI & WWII pension index cards.
10:34:47 From Dave Robison  : “Speeling duzn’t cownt”
10:35:24 From Deb Andrew : DH talked to a manager at Ancestry. The first person tried to tell him nothing was wrong, he then asked to talk to a manager.
10:36:04 From Hilary Gadsby : If the records have been mistranscribed originally the corrections do not come over to Family Search just the original transcription. I found one for an Eleanor which had come over as something else just this weekend
10:36:30 From Randy Seaver : thank you, Deb. Amazing. Of course, they don’t have a server farm anymore. Management changes ==> layoffs ==> customer problems

10:36:49 From Dawn Carlile : I hear from professional researchers and they are bookmarking the records they use frequently so they can easily find them. Even if indexed they do not show up in the searches.

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: I recommend downloading each document, and citing it in your desktop genealogy database program. Your citation would conform with Elizabeth Shown Mills’ thinking including date viewed. See:

QuickLesson 22: What Citation Template Do I Use? “The real question is not What template should I use?  It’s What kind of a source do I have?

Record Citation vs. Record Identification   “Newer researchers think of “source identification” in terms of How do I cite this?  The underlying issue, however, is not how to cite. It is, instead…”

10:37:24 From Dawn Carlile : On familysearch I always check the ONLINE box.
10:37:39 From June Butka : I find if you look at the citation and see a film number and image number, use those numbers in the catalog search , not the collection. I found more that way without getting the index with no image. There were images available.
10:37:51 From Roxanne Cummings Basey : Dawn – what does the ONLINE box accomplish?
10:38:08 From Deb Andrew : Ancestry said it would all be fix probably in two weeks, but no more than a month. I doubt it.
10:38:25 From Dawn Carlile : It only shows you results that are digitized so you do not have to keep clicking and loking to see what is digitized,
10:38:41 From Randy Seaver to All panelists : Russ, can you highlgiht Deb Andrew’s comments?
10:38:43 From Roxanne Cummings Basey : I agree – the soundex helped me find a record that I couldn’t find otherwise on ancestry.
10:38:43 From Melissa Barker : Internet Archive is a great resource!
10:39:55 From Randy Seaver : Pension cards or draft registration cards?
10:41:43 From marian koalski : That leads to low morale among the remaining staff, too.
10:41:50 From Cousin Russ : https://www.familysearch.org/catalog/search
10:42:03 From Cousin Russ : https://search.findmypast.com/search-world-records
10:42:04 From DearMYRTLE to Cousin Russ(Privately) : https://www.ancestry.com/
10:43:32 From Dawn Carlile : Randy, it is under pension cards.
10:44:02 From Sherry Everett : I’m fairly new to genealogy and my first time here. so I’m sorry I know none of the people on the panel. thank you for providing info
10:44:10 From Valerie Lisk : What i the advantage of WikiTree over Familysearch?
10:45:00 From Dave Robison to Sherry Everett : Sherry Everett—Welcome to Mondays With Myrt!!
10:45:01 From June Butka : Those who offered DAR/SAR help can PM at Facebook June Stearns Butka.
10:45:01 From Micki Minner : I never could figure out how to use WikiTree…might be a good session for me to attend and learn

10:51:44 From Bill West : It drives me crazy that MyHeritage emails me they’ve found new records and most of them are not records but family trees on WikiTree and Geni.com. They are NOT records, they are trees!
10:52:05 From Kathleen` Newbill to All panelists : I agree with Bill West…it’s very frustrating!

10:52:33 From Valerie Lisk : I have RootsMagic and a tree on Familysearch. A DNA pedigree tree on all of the testing sites. I didn’t know if it was worth adding another online tree.
10:53:36 From DearMYRTLE : Daniel Horowitz is the Chief Genealogy Officer at MyHeritage.com
10:54:22 From Linda Jordan to All panelists : Yes, Micki, WikiTree is hard to learn. One also has to have documentation — and list it all, for each person and event, which is good, but very time consuming when you have lots of people to add and no matches to others already on WikiTree. Also, when I finally found a person that was already on the tree however the person I contacted has still not replied so the person hasn’t been added as yet. That was a couple of months ago.

10:54:48 From Maria Tegtmeier : Speaking of DNA, I appreciated Pat sharing Thomas MacEntee’s post on FB about National DNA day and DNA scams.

DNA DAY and Thomas MacEntee’s warning video – https://www.facebook.com/groups/DearMYRTLE/permalink/10160353011115374/

10:54:56 From Cyndy Bray : I agree with Bill and Russ. Most of the trees I get from My Heritage are not sourced at all.
10:55:16 From Randy Seaver : Remember that WikiTree started before FamilySearch Family Tree, but after other collaborative trees like OneGreatFamily, One World Tree, etc.
10:56:13 From Randy Seaver : A WikiTree advantage is being able to upload a GEDCOM file, but you have to match your GEDCOM profiles to existing profiles.
10:56:28 From Dawn Carlile : Randy – The Fold3 description is Veterans Administration Pension Payment Cards, This image is an example. https://www.fold3.com/image/591268767
10:56:58 From marian koalski : The WikiTree presentation is visually difficult for me. I like their philosophy and efforts, but it’s hard for me to scan and separate the person’s profile from other stuff on the page.
10:57:36 From Sherry Everett : So for a novice, which is the best place to start? Ancestry or someplace else?
10:57:38 From Linda Jordan : Also, when I finally found a person that was already on the tree however the person I contacted has still not replied so the person hasn’t been added as yet. That was a couple of months ago.
10:59:51 From Randy Seaver : thank you, Dawn. I didn’t know about that collection. i’ll check it out later.
11:00:59 From Randy Seaver : Jackie – WikiTree is FREE, Geni.com is not for the big tree. WikiTree has GEDCOM upload, Geni does not. WikiTree has 17 million profiles, Geni claims 120 million.
11:02:08 From Randy Seaver : Geni provides Hints from MyHeritage, no Hints on WikiTree. Sources are prominent on WikiTree, nonexistent on Geni. WikiTree for genealogists, Geni started as a family photo sharing site.
11:03:12 From marian koalski : Yes, I like FamilySearch’s layout
11:05:00 From Rachel Evans : I think I spend more time in the Family Search trees fixing things. I have an ancestor who people keep changing his name and children to someone else’s. I put a discussion in his profile but people keep changing it back. It does get fustrating at times.
11:05:08 From Cyndy Bray : Famiy Search tree has errors for my famiy, not sure how to correct
11:05:12 From Dawn Carlile : I prefer the list of siblings and children on FamilySearch. The paragraph is to hard to scan and spot names.
11:05:21 From marian koalski : On FamilySearch, when I click on a fact, it will tell me which sources apply to it.

11:06:47 From Holly Hansen : You can watch ancestors or any individual in FamilySearch’s Tree, with email notifications that alert you to changes made. You can turn this on or off.

11:06:48 From Randy Seaver : I use FamilySearch’s Tree extensively because it will be long lasting and is BIG. But it has problems with duplicate profiles and anyone can change a profile. I use RootsMagic to match my RM persons to FSFT profiles and exchange data back and forth, standardize FSFT place names, etc.
11:07:44 From Roxanne Cummings Basey : Does FamilySearch only allow a person to have one tree uploaded? [NOTE from DearMYRTLE: it’s one big tree, and we each add to it.]
11:08:10 From Jackie Wilson : I just saw that a woman just died this month – she was proved to have been born in 1900!
11:08:47 From Maria Tegtmeier : I love how RootsMagic integrates with FamilySearch. They are powerful together.
11:10:29 From Roxanne Cummings Basey : I have Legacy Family Tree.
11:10:36 From Shelley Murphy : I think I will set once a week time to work on my Roots Magic tree…I am not using it to its fullest. I get too busy chases DNA matches.
11:11:03 From Randy Seaver : FamilySearch Tree is the biggest available collaborative tree. I’ve found the 19th and early 20th century families are pretty accurate with few duplicates. Much of the data was input by LDS members from family records. 17th century profiles can be problematic – multiple sets of parents, multiple sets of children, duplicate spouses, etc.
11:11:55 From Randy Seaver : FST is set up to have discussions, to have sources, to have notes, including research notes. Users need to use all of that to foster better collaboration.
11:13:13 From Valerie Lisk : I met 3 previously unknown cousins on FST.
11:13:14 From Randy Seaver : Roxanne – watch some of the Legacy videos about using LFT with FamilySearch Family Tree.
11:13:52 From Roxanne Cummings Basey : Thanks Randy. Will do asap.
11:15:10 From marian koalski : The LFT videos are excellent, and they teach methods that could (should) be applied to other packages, too (like how to add sources, how to name places, etc.)


11:16:06 From Maria Tegtmeier : I like the FamilySearch Memory App [that syncs with my profile, or an ancestors’ at ]FamilySearch. You can easily record a memory or upload a picture and quickly link it to person.
11:16:54 From Deb Andrew : I had a issue with that, family said man was the father, when he was not, but his brother. I had to use DNA to prove it.
11:17:06 From Valerie Lisk : I added it once I found DNA proof. That’s what happened to my paternam grandmother.
11:17:28 From Dawn Carlile : I would add it to my RootsMagic tree and the source would say family tradition, who told me, etc.
11:17:38 From Dawn Carlile : DNA!
11:18:29 From Dawn Carlile : Keep in mind that those siblings were probably told that info by the same person.
11:26:02 From marian koalski : I put “maybe” at the front of the possible surname, like “maybe Franklin”
11:27:14 From Cousin Russ : DNA DAY and Thomas MacEntee’s warning – https://www.facebook.com/groups/DearMYRTLE/permalink/10160353011115374/
11:27:20 From Deb Andrew : I put an open note on Ancestry for a challenged descendant and why it is challenged.
11:30:02 From Micki Minner : I am the oldest of 4, and all 4 of us siblings have all different DNA percentages…however, I also found that 1 of us do not have the same mother and father as the other 3! Blaine Bettinger helped me determine that she must have been adopted or taken in by my parents. Shock to all of us! NOBODY knew…yes, I agree…even family tradition should be noted in your files! I have “suspicions” about her parentage, but no proof “yet”
11:30:25 From Shelley Murphy : I submitted a Living DNA test and waiting to see what comes back vs the other tests I have taken.
11:30:30 From Randy Seaver : I would add “Transfer raw data to GEDMatch” also, which is FREE.
11:30:34 From Shelley Murphy : “Cousin Bait”.
11:30:45 From Micki Minner : YEA…COUSIN BAIT!
11:30:52 From Betsey Cotter to All panelists : If I tested my parents, is there any reason to test my siblings?
11:31:31 From Randy Seaver : FTDNA, MyHeritage and GEDMatch have chromosome browsers that can help you find common DNA segments and identify common ancestors.
11:31:32 From Shelley Murphy : MyHeritage results came back and is a bit different then ancestry and 23andme. It was interesting.
11:32:16 From Shelley Murphy : When will Ancestry put up a chromosome browser?
11:33:14 From Randy Seaver : Shelley, they have resisted forever. We need a browser, but also the tools to identify chromosome segments that match.
11:33:47 From Kathleen` Newbill to All panelists : I thought the question was exclusionary…you and your siblings can only have the DNA your parents have. If they’ve tested, won’t their DNA cover the ground as far as relatives are concerned?
11:34:09 From Randy Seaver : MyHeritage has done a great job with the tools in a short time.
11:34:18 From Deb Andrew : I view testing siblings along with parents, is that the siblings, including yourself adds another layer for the future generations who are trying to reach back.
11:34:43 From Shelley Murphy : Living DNA was at Rootstech…it was also an interesting sales pitch.

DNA Painter
11:35:04 From Shelley Murphy : I want to learn DNA Painter.
11:36:38 From Micki Minner : DNA Painter helped me a LOT! I would get DNA “matches” that I couldn’t figure out…and on DNA Painter you can easily see what side of the family the match lands!
11:36:42 From Bill West : I know of someone who insists that DNA testing is the final word in confirming the accuracy of a family tree but where results for siblings can differ I don’t think that is true.
11:36:59 From Valerie Lisk : They have linked Blaine’s cM chart to DNApainter as a calculator. You can change the amount of cM and see the posible relationships.
11:38:30 From Cousin Russ : DNA PAINTER https://dnapainter.com/
11:39:07 From Cousin Russ : DNA DAY and Thomas MacEntee’s warning video – https://www.facebook.com/groups/DearMYRTLE/permalink/10160353011115374/
11:39:33 From Cousin Russ : DNAQuest (pro bono by MyHeritage) is now world wide https://www.dnaquest.org/
11:40:32 From marian koalski : Is that young woman going to head-punch her grandmother with her hat?
11:40:39 From Shelley Murphy : They are building their nitch!
11:41:09 From Shelley Murphy : My numbers were different vs ancestryDNA
11:42:36 From Dawn Carlile : Not that one. It is the MyHeritage DNA, not Geoff Live.

11:43:29 From Cousin Russ : Hands-On with MyHeritage DNA https://familytreewebinars.com/download.php?webinar_id=792
11:43:48 From Cyndy Bray : MyHeritage webinars are always free on Legacy’s Family Tree Webinars.
11:43:49 From Shelley Murphy : It’s the best $49 a year I have spent.
11:43:56 From Dawn Carlile : Geoff is also related to Ron Snir, I think it was him. One of the two men from MyHeritage that day anyway.
11:44:20 From Cousin Russ : Gail Dever Petition to save WWI-era Ukrainian internee cemetery in Quebec http://genealogyalacarte.ca/?p=23508
11:44:22 From Randy Seaver : Ethnicity estimates with different companies are varied – I’ve found 23andMe and MyHeritage are best for me. It has everything to do with the reference groups used to identify n ethnicity
11:44:32 From Cousin Russ : Judy Russell’s NARA DIGITIZED RECORDS http://www.legalgenealogist.com/2018/04/20/and-another-thing/

11:44:46 From Cousin Russ : We CONTINUE our discussion here: https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/102461242403735457058/+DearmyrtlePage/posts/DSxgndQdEqp
11:45:05 From Cousin Russ : This technology will become available by the end of the year? Wow! https://thefamilycurator.com/how-to-preserve-and-test-old-letters-for-grandmas-dna/
11:45:07 From Valerie Lisk : They have sales were it’s 40% off and usually Thomas M. gives a coupon code for an additional 15% off.
11:45:08 From Cousin Russ : .
11:47:34 From Donna Burleaud : Thanks for keeping us so well informed about genealogy topics!
11:47:52 From Janine Edmée Hakim : te title of the article is Can DNA testing be trusted? The shockingly imprecise science of a proven courtroom tool
11:47:56 From Shelley Murphy : Good talk today…enjoy the rest of your day!
11:48:20 From Dawn Carlile : Wonderful information once again!
11:48:23 From Danine Cozzens : So much helpful info today — thanks to all!
11:48:37 From Randy Seaver : Janine, thery don’t use the genealogy tools for criminal testing – they use other DNA test methods.
11:48:41 From Mary Lou Gravatt : Great Hang out!
11:49:08 From Deb Andrew : Yes,
11:50:28 From Hilary Gadsby : I am going to get some birthday cake and more tea. HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

11:50:45 From Tina Torsey : What Chapter are we doing Wed? AmericaGen Study Group
11:53:36 From Cousin Russ : AmericaGen Study Group, Wednesday, April 25, 2018 Chapter 4 “Evidence”, Noon Eastern US (New York), 11am Central US (Chicago), 10am Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 9am Pacific US (Los Angeles)

SYLLABUS – Researchers Guide to American Genealogy 4th Edition by Val D. Greenwood, 2017 (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co.) Available in paperback

https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_m-BvT1rGQGWI6RMyC2YRKw

11:53:51 From Tina Torsey to All panelists : thanks
11:56:30 From Janine Edmée Hakim : Thanks Randy Seaver… good to know that the DNA that might be collected from an artifact or stamp will be more accurately analyzed and therefore be reliable when it is used for genealogy.

Wednesday, 25 April 2018 THE ARCHIVE LADY, 9pm Eastern US (New York), 8pm Central US (Chicago), 7pm Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 6pm Pacific US (Los Angeles) We are delighted to feature our resident archivist Melissa LeMaster Barker, who serves as the Certified Archives Manager at the Houston County, Tennessee Archives. A popular genealogical speaker, author and blogger, Melissa is also the FGS Forum Reviews Editor.

https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_vrzNTLJ0SjuDZq5iJk5yfA


AFTER PARTY
11:59:25 From Valerie Lisk : John do you know approx. how much you need per day in Stratford Upon Avon for food etc?
12:01:06 From Valerie Lisk : How much would a pub meal be. We are doing the hop on hop off bus.
12:02:39 From Valerie Lisk : I’m trying to make sure I load my travel card with enogh money.
12:02:40 From Kathleen` Newbill : 12 to 15 Euro per person when I was in Belfast in February.


FEE
This DearMYRTLE Event is presented at no cost. If you find the information useful, consider the Pay What You Want business model Ol’ Myrt employs: http://blog.dearmyrtle.com/2015/03/hangouts-pay-what-you-want.html


DearMYRTLE's Profile Pic
Myrt’s Musings

Here’s the link to DearMYRTLE’s Event Calendar – http://hangouts.dearmyrtle.com/calendar.html

Here’s the link to the GeneaWebinars Blog & Calendar of other genealogy webinars, chats and hangouts – http://blog.geneawebinars.com/p/calendar.html


 

 

ISBGFH: Mini-Institute Aug 2018, Philadelphia

ISBGFHResearching Family in the British Isles

The Historical Society of Pennsylvania (HSP) has partnered with the International Society for British Genealogy and Family History (ISBGFH) to conduct a four day program of researching family in the British Isles. ISBGFH conducts the British Institute held annually in Salt Lake City to provide week-long education by well-known genealogists on the British Isles. From 13-16 August 2018, the ISBGFH has arranged for several presenters to provide an overview of researching British Isles topics at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. These presentations will explore DNA, Scotland, Ireland and England research. London based genetic genealogist Dr. Maurice Gleeson, MB, will present on DNA and Irish research, Christine Woodcock, from Genealogy Tours of Scotland, will discuss Scottish research, and Frank Southcott, President, ISBGFH, will explore the English records.

The HSP program is designed to be attended either on a given day and topic or in its entirety. It is an in-depth overview of British Isles research and enhances attendance for those who may desire to attend the British Institute where morning instruction and afternoon independent research are conducted in the LDS Family History Library in Salt Lake City on a country topic. More information about the British Institute is available HERE

The HSP curriculum for each day involves 4 presentations of one hour and fifteen minutes each. Monday, 13 August 2018, Dr Gleeson, MB, will explore advances made in DNA and how it can be applied to your British Isles research. Christine Woodcock will discuss the uniqueness of Scottish research on Tuesday, 14 August 2018. Dr. Gleeson will return on Wednesday, 15 August 2018, to present on the ever increasing resources available on Irish research, and Thursday, 16 August 2018, Frank Southcott, will examine English genealogical resources.

The cost of the four day program will be $299. Individual program days are available for $99 per day. Limited consultation slots will be available on DNA, Scotland and Ireland during the program for $125 hour.
Registration:
http://hsp.org/calendar/researching-family-british-isles


DNA Instructor: Dr Maurice GleesonMaurice Gleeson

  • An introduction to DNA testing for Genealogy
    This introductory talk will explain the basics of DNA testing, the three main types of test, how each one can be applied in practice (with examples), and which one is best for you to specifically address your genealogical conundrums.
  • Using Y-DNA to research your surname of choice
    Anyone can research any particular surname (i.e. family name) that they want – you just need to find the right cousin to test. Y-DNA is eminently suited to surname research because it follows the same path as hereditary surnames i.e. back along the father father father line. This talk explores surname DNA studies and what they can reveal about your surname
  • Applying autosomal DNA to your family history research – the theory
    The most popular of the DNA tests is the autosomal test. This can be used to research all of your ancestral lines (as opposed to Y-DNA and mitochondrial DNA which only help you explore a single ancestral line each). This talk explores the basic science behind autosomal DNA testing, the secrets to successfully applying it, and how it can be combined with other tests and genealogy to help answer specific genealogical questions.
  • Applying autosomal DNA to your family history research – the practice
    This is a more in-depth look at the use of autosomal DNA, including a step-by-step approach to tackling your matches, the concept of triangulation, the use of third party tools, and how techniques used to help adoptees trace their birth family can also help us to break thru our genealogical Brick Walls.

Scottish Genealogy Instructor Christine WoodcockChristine Woodcock

  • In Search of Your Scottish Ancestors: Search Your Roots; Discover Your Heritage
    While many people want to know more about their Scottish heritage, they don’t know where to begin. Fortunately, researching our Scottish ancestors is a fairly easy task. Knowing where to look is usually where we get tied up. This presentation will get you started in researching your Scottish ancestry as well as how to make the most of your research. Topics Include: starting your search, reaching out to others, ScotlandsPeople website, Scottish naming patterns, marriages and family history societies.
  • Breaking Through Brick Walls in Scottish Research
    Scottish documents contain a wealth of information and can make researching so much easier when you really take a look at what the documents are telling you. It becomes important to really pay attention to the key words on the documents so that you know what records you need to look at next in order to break through brick walls and learn as much as you can about your Scottish ancestors. In this presentation we will look at the key words on the documents that may help break down the brick wall. Then we will look at where those records exist and how you can access them.
  • Online and Offline Databases for Scottish Genealogy Research
    There comes a time when you have done all of the online researching you can do using the standard databases. In this presentation you will learn of the databases that aren’t as well know but that can assist in breaking through your brick walls. These include: websites for researching Scottish occupations, websites specific to the genealogy of regions where your ancestors might have lived, emigration databases, military databases, witchcraft databases, medieval ancestry, and British newspapers.
  • Military Men, Covenanters and Jacobites: Historic Events That Led to Mass Migration
    This session will help you understand the importance of the events in Scottish history that led to a large number of Scots leaving their homeland for life in the Americas. In order to be successful researching in the Scottish records, we need to know where in Scotland our ancestors originated. Bridging the gap between finding them in the North American records (birth, marriage, death and census records) and being able to locate them in the Scottish records may seem like a daunting task. However, it is often less of a challenge and more of a reward if you understand what brought them here in the first place. Some clues can be taken from the major historic events in Scottish history that led to Scots leaving their homeland.

Irish Research Instructor Dr Maurice Gleeson

Maurice Gleeson

 

  • Tracing Your Ancestors Back to Ireland
    For many Irish-Americans, all they know is their ancestor “came from Ireland” but they have no further information than that. This talk gives an overview of the various techniques & records available in the US (and elsewhere) that can be used to help trace your ancestor back to where they came from in Ireland. These include shipping records, emigration records, but also surname dictionaries and distribution maps.
  • Irish Church and Civil Registration Records
    In the last year or so, many of the civil registration records are coming online. Most of these are now available for free via http://www.irishgenealogy.ie and digital images of the original record can be downloaded. Civil registration started in 1864 for most records. Prior to this, one has to rely on church records for tracing further back and these can be very helpful indeed or not at all – coverage is patchy and most records peter out around 1800-1830. However, all of Ireland is covered by two websites and most of this research can be done from the comfort of your own home.
  • Census, Census Substitutes, and Land Records
    Census records survive for only 1901 and 1911, with some scraps from other years. Griffith’s Valuation can be very helpful as a mid-1800 census substitute but it is the Cancelled or Revised Valuation Books that provide a wealth of information that allow tracing relatives forward and backward from the present day to the 1850s. We will also look at the Tithe Applotment books and the Registry of Deeds.
  • Less Common Irish Genealogical Records
    This talk explores the wealth of genealogical material to be found in newspapers, cemeteries, probate, petty session court records, & dog licenses. We will also explore some of the resources that everyone should be using as a routine part of their ongoing Irish research.

English Research Instructor Frank Southcott
Frank Southcott

  • Researching Your Family in England: Census and National Registration
    A useful England census has been conducted every 10 years since 1841 and is accessible through 1911. It is the primary resource to establish families in England during that period. England also conducted a national registration in 1939 as an ancillary of WWII. Both of these resources will be explored during this session.
  • Researching Your Family in England: Civil Registration
    Civil registration of birth, marriages and deaths commenced on 1 July 1837. Explore the records and idiosyncrasies of the registration process in England and how to obtain the information for your family.
  • Researching Your Family in England: Wills and Church Records
    Wills survive from early times. Baptisms, marriages and burials survive in a great number of parishes from the mid-1500’s. This session will explore the available probate and church records and the wealth of information that can be derived.
  • Researching English Family at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania
    Many people are surprised at the vast collection of British Isles records available at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania library. Explore the records and resources available for British Isles family research at HSP with Daniel Rolph, PhD, Historian and Head of Reference Services.

Registration:
http://hsp.org/calendar/researching-family-british-isle

ARCHIVED: WACKY Wednesday – 11 Apr 2018

WACKYWednesdayPromo

We had too much to discuss during this week’s Mondays with Myrt, it spilled over into this episode of WACKY Wednesday.

 

SELECTED TEXT

00:28:09 True Lewis: YaY SHELLEY!!!!!!!!
00:28:28 Shelley Murphy: Hey there True!!!! and all…xoxo
00:28:35 Dustin Austin: Hey True!
00:28:43 True Lewis: Hello Dustin!—
00:28:52 Shelley Murphy: Hey there Melissa and Dustin!
00:28:58 Melissa Barker: Hello Everyone!
00:29:06 Dustin Austin: Hey Melissa and Shelly!! 🙂 🙂 🙂

Old letters
00:29:06 Cousin Russ: Denise Levenick https://thefamilycurator.com/ethics-etiquette-and-old-family-letters
00:30:27 True Lewis: I do have them….I have my own. I don’t think I’ll mind when I’m gone. I’ll be resting in peace.
00:31:00 Betty-Lu Burton: It depends. Are the people still alive? Are you reading them as part of history?
00:31:54 Diane minor: it depends. I have some letters my grandmother sent to her children when she was hospitalized after having a stillborn baby. they are painful to me to read and I feel very protective about sharing the contents.
00:32:54 Jody: found a suitcase full between my parents when dad was in korea during Vietnam war. parents read through them again recently and threw out a bunch. I probably should have just kept quiet about having them and brought them out when they were gone.
00:38:12 Betty-Lu Burton: Newsy letters that talk about family going ons yes I would share. Love letters would depend on what is in them
00:39:38 Betty-Lu Burton: It is beautiful
00:40:28 True Lewis: WoW! Oh My that was a treasure!
00:42:02 Diane minor: Good point Sadie.
00:44:58 Shelley Murphy: are those books behind you Russ as big as they look on the cam?
00:47:02 Shelley Murphy: oh my goodness!
00:47:43 True Lewis: She made a good point….We forget they were young once. My parents were very open as they got older.
00:47:45 Holly Hansen: I was able to fix up a system to digitize my audio tapes. It was pretty simple. I had an old karaoke machine and bought a $8.00 cord to hook it to my computer. You can do it easy Russ.
00:53:50 Shelley Murphy: that is what Thomas Jefferson did, he tracked all of his planting and the weather, etc.
00:55:34 True Lewis: I have a Ledger from a grocery clerk in early 1900’s for one of my Ancestors Dock Henry his account to J. O. Hixson.
00:57:17 Holly Hansen: The Multi-Media Centers does a great job. I send them all my old wire tapes too.
01:01:15 Shelley Murphy: It’s all about telling the stories!

DNA How to tell their story

May 12, 2018 – 8:30am to 5pm

Location: At the Jefferson School African American Heritage Center

233 4th St. NW, 2nd Floor, Charlottesville, VA

Presented by MAAGI Coordinators:

  • Bernice Bennett
  • Angela Walton-Raji
  • Shelley Murphy

https://familytreegirl.com/2018/04/08/dna-and-genealogy-how-to-tell-the-story-charlottesville-va/
http://jeffschoolheritagecenter.org

01:09:59 Cousin Russ: Mid-Western African American Genealogy Institute http://www.maagiinstitute.org
01:10:49 True Lewis: It took me a week to recover when I got home from MAAGI
01:12:42 Dustin Austin: GO Shelley, Bernice & Angela!
01:13:51 True Lewis: I had no idea you were going to be on Shelley! I just talked to you last night. lol. Parley made you forget to tell me. Glad I showed up.
01:14:57 True Lewis: This was a Awesome Wacky Wednesday.
01:17:07 Shelley Murphy: Thank you all!
01:17:21 Melissa Barker: Shelley! You are my HERO!
01:18:19 Shelley Murphy: Thank you Melissa!
01:19:57 Shelley Murphy: Thats amazing…
01:20:16 Cousin Russ: If you are have genealogy methodogy, DNA, technology or research questions, be sure to consult Katherine R. Willson’s Genealogy on Facebook listing of over 10,000+ groups and pages: https://socialmediagenealogy.com/genealogy-on-facebook-list/
01:21:23 Shelley Murphy: what a great resource

ethnicity
DearMYRTLE and Cousin Russ recognize the United Nations’ International Decade for People of African Descent 2015-2024. We reach out to _all_ regardless of race, color, creed, sexual orientation or national origin with support for researching family and documenting cultural inheritance.

01:23:19 Cousin Russ: WHERE are DearMYRTLE’s Webinars archived? At MYRT’S MUSINGS http://dearmyrtle.com/blog2/index.php/blog/
01:23:45 Shelley Murphy: True, yes…2x Grandfather Parley Worden is on my mine…I can’t wait to finish the argument!
01:26:35 Betty-Lu Burton: I am surprise the number of indexed records is as high as 30%
01:27:01 Cousin Russ: Robert Kehrer’s Search Indices Created from Images Sets https://youtu.be/WMTUZPcFJj0

01:27:11 Cousin Russ: Robert Kehrer’s Search from the FamilySearch Catalog https://youtu.be/AlX5SxI64wk REMEMBER he’s the Senior Product Manager for FamilySearch “SEARCH” and “HINTING”, so he ought to know.

01:27:19 Cousin Russ: Robert Kehrer’s Navigating Image Waypoints https://youtu.be/Nzg6rsBusk8

01:31:30 Shelley Murphy: Great being with you all tonight…
01:31:30 Susan Bleimehl: Thanks for a great evening.

 

 

 


FEE
This DearMYRTLE Event is presented at no cost. If you find the information useful, consider the Pay What You Want business model Ol’ Myrt employs: http://blog.dearmyrtle.com/2015/03/hangouts-pay-what-you-want.html


DearMYRTLE's Profile Pic
Myrt’s Musings

Here’s the link to DearMYRTLE’s Event Calendar – http://hangouts.dearmyrtle.com/calendar.html

Here’s the link to the GeneaWebinars Blog & Calendar of other genealogy webinars, chats and hangouts – http://blog.geneawebinars.com/p/calendar.html