ARCHIVED: Mondays with Myrt – 29 Jan 2018

MondaysWithMyrt

Tune in to the archived version of our latest webinar – Mondays with Myrt held 29 Jan 2018. You’ll find selected chat dialog and the links we mention below this embedded video.

We looked at Pat Kuhn’s ancestor’s “young men’s” WWII draft card indexed at Ancestry pointing to the image on Fold3, and caution all to watch what information gets shared during a Family Tree Maker sync or RootsMagic share option.Many explained they manually update their personal database with images from hints on various websites. That way transcriptions are most accurate, and citations can be custom crafted.

DearMYRTLE is concerned when people use the FamilySearch prompt with possible names for temple work. These are prompts for research to ensure the name and identifying info is truly an ancestor. We find out what Elizabeth Shown Mills has to say about the necessity of citing a repository – there is one instance where it is essential.

Moving on, we tackled the various RootsTech passes (different days/prices) and that it’s best to download the handouts via computer so you can save the file with a recognizable name. Dropbox would make these available to any of your devices. One may take the TRAX train from the airport if your hotel does not have a shuttle. See the embedded map below.

Find out about hashtags, #GenChat, and Tweet Deck for what Cheri Passey calls “The fastest hour in genealogy!”

 


Upcoming Events

AmericaGen STUDY GROUP – Chapter 1
31 Jan 2018 – Noon Eastern US (New York), 11am Central (Chicago), 10 am Mountain (Salt Lake City and Denver), 9am Pacific (Los Angeles)

Researchers Guide to American Genealogy 4th Edition by Val D. Greenwood, 2017 (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co.) Available in paperback https://www.amazon.com/Researchers-Guide-American-Genealogy-4th/dp/0806320664
Noon Eastern US (New York), 11am Central (Chicago), 10 am Mountain (Salt Lake City and Denver), 9am Pacific (Los Angeles)
REGISTRATION PAGE https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_m-BvT1rGQGWI6RMyC2YRKw


Albion’s Seed Study Group
Syllabus – Albion’s Seed: Four British Folkways in America by David Hackett Fischer, 1989 (New York: Oxford University Press). Paperback available from
https://www.amazon.com/Albions-Seed-British-Folkways-cultural/dp/0195069056

Wednesday, 31 Jan 2018 – 9pm Eastern US (New York), 8pm Central US (Chicago), 7pm Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 6pm Pacific US (Los Angeles)
The South of England to Virginia: Distressed Cavaliers and Indentured Servants 1642-75
Registration link for all sessions: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_uOEpyna0QZWA6QNEE0GWUQ


REGISTER for DearMYRTLE’s February Webinarshttp://dearmyrtle.com/blog2/index.php/2018/01/26/register-feb-2018-dearmyrtle-webinars


Plusword – A game show hosted by Sir Michael Daniels. Come support the home team as we meet two other teams in a match of wits. This is a “view and comment” only link. No need to register. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jK-vumCmPV8 Starts at 10pm Eastern US (New York) Friday, 9 Feb 2018.


Ambassador_Badge_Tw_440x220

RootsTech (Genealogy & technology conference) where DearMYRTLE is serving as an official RT Ambassador.
28 Feb through 3 March 2018 – at the Salt Palace in downtown Salt Lake City, Utah.
Registration link: http://www.RootsTech.org


Selected Chat Comments

00:36:32 Sheryl Whisenhunt: Good Morning from California.
00:36:57 Bill West: Good morning from a gloomy south of Boston
00:37:18 Pam Helm: Good Morning
00:39:47 Lisa Gorrell: Good morning, everyone!
00:41:20 JohnLaws: Hi from a cold but bright North Berwick


Regarding Pat Kuhn’s U.S. WWII Draft Cards Young Men, 1940-1947 research at Ancestry. (Screen shot below is the search result for Pat’s ancestors George Charles O’Donnell, born 1922.)

George Charles O'Donnell's WWII Draft Card

00:44:31 Deb Andrew: She only needs the Fold3 subscription, doesn’t have to upgrade the Ancestry account.
00:51:41 Betty-Lu Burton: The age is wrong. The card says 19 Ancestry says 20
00:54:04 Bill West: This is why I’m leery of syncing my Ancestry & RootsMagic trees. I download all records to my HD the old fashioned way and enter all data from the image,itself, not the transcription.
00:56:01 Lisa Gorrell: Be careful. This collection is not complete. Keep checking back. I did not find my two grandfathers’ cards. But I do have them from NARA.
00:57:04 June Butka: I found that names were added to my family Search tree that I didn’t add. I also found I could not add a second wife if the other wife’s name is already there.
00:58:09 RandySeaver: This is why I don’t attach records from Ancestry to my RootsMagic tree, and create my own source citatyions.
00:58:45 HilaryGadsby: Look at what the dataset covers I am looking for someone born in Illinois but they are not online yet.
00:59:39 Marian Koalski: I’m opinionated too, Randy. And Ancestry’s citations don’t have the needed info to re-find the record, even if you overlook their whimsical formatting
01:00:24 June Butka: It was a record hint I was trying to add. I can add them independently.

FamilySearch Temple Prompts

01:00:25 Betty-Lu Burton: FamilySearch will split large databases into smaller groups so they can start to get the information out sooner. Los Angeles County Death records are in at least 4 groups and we are working on reviewing the 3 and 4 groups. Still have a long way to go
01:00:46 HilaryGadsby: I have added second wife at Family Search
RootsMagic01:06:47 RandySeaver: duplicate Facts occur in RootsMagic when you merge a person with another

Cousin Russ01:08:35 Cousin Russ: Cousin Russ’ YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/CousinRussYouTube
01:08:41 Cousin Russ: Cousin Russ’ A Worthington Weblog: https://worthy2be.wordpress.com

DearMYRTLE’s OLD Blog: http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
DearMYRTLE’s NEW Blog Myrt’s Musings http://DearMYRTLE.com/blog2
01:09:26 Cousin Russ: DearMYRTLE’s YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE
01:09:47 June Butka: That is useful. I need to get comfortable with the learning curve to where the Zoom Playbacks are with links.
01:10:01 Cousin Russ: DearMYRTLE’s Genealogy Community on Google+ Plus: http://bit.ly/DearMYRTLEonGoogle
01:10:12 Cousin Russ: *HANGOUTS: Pay what you want* by DearMYRTLE. http://blog.dearmyrtle.com/2015/03/hangouts-pay-what-you-want.html
01:10:37 Cousin Russ: DearMYRTLE’s Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/DearMYRTLE/


01:11:04 Cousin Russ: GeneaWebinars Calendar of Hangouts, Webinars and Online Chats this coming week: http://www.GeneaWebinars.com
01:12:24 RandySeaver: My research/opinion/news/stuff blog is www.geneamusings.com
01:14:38 HilaryGadsby: Can you share a calendar with just a few people?
01:16:12 RandySeaver: Way back when, I entered only libraries and public repositories because that’s where I found books or records. The repositories I entered 15 years ago are still in my source records.
01:16:28 Betty-Lu Burton: If it is on line then it has a URL and not a repository. Is not a repository a brick and morter building?
01:18:26 HilaryGadsby: Putting something online publishes it but what is published may only be an image not the original. What you cite depends upon what you see.
01:21:04 RandySeaver: Launa – I would state that in the repository field, and/or in the source comment field in RootsMagic

Elizabeth Shown Mill’s writes “Repositories need to be named when we have visited a facility to use an unpublished record that does not exist anywhere else except that facility.”  https://www.facebook.com/elizabeth.shownmills/posts/1214556458675665

01:24:06 June Butka: The box wasn’t checked off above the previous link that said not shareable.
01:26:34 Marian Koalski: I think entering the repository is useful to everyone in the case of a rare book, too.
01:28:13 Cousin Russ: Linda – The Blog has a search field


01:28:22 Cousin Russ: https://www.rootstech.org
01:28:50 Cheri Passey: Dave, can’t wait to meet you in person at RootsTech!
01:30:11 Lisa Gorrell: This will be my first time at RootsTech. Couldn’t believe how many classes there are!
01:31:14 RandySeaver: It took almost an hour last night to download the Wednesday handouts from http://app.core-apps.com/rootstech2018/events/view_by_day?tracks&type
01:31:21 Cheri Passey: So glad you will be there, Lisa!
01:31:55 RandySeaver: I’m going to download each day on different nights – it’s boring and requires attention to detail
01:32:47 Yvonne Demoskoff: Some of the labs are already filled up; darn.
01:33:38 Betty-Lu Burton: They still do not have the broadcast classes listed yet
01:34:38 RandySeaver: Betty-Lu – they usually announce them a week or so before it starts. You can sometimes suss it out by the Hall it uses. I think Hall C.
01:35:01 Betty-Lu Burton: Thanks Randy

RootsTech Smartphone App
01:37:26 Cousin Russ: 7 Ways the Mobile App Will Enhance Your RootsTech Experience https://www.rootstech.org/blog/7-ways-the-mobile-app-will-enhance-your-rootstech-experience [NOTE: The RootsTech mobile app, sponsored by WordPress, is now available for download from the App Store and the Google Play Store. ]
01:37:46 Yvonne Demoskoff: On the app, when I click to view Exhibit Hall in “Maps”, it closes the app; does anyone have this problem, too?
01:38:33 HilaryGadsby: Not tried it yet Yvonne
01:39:16 Yvonne Demoskoff: Oh ok, Hilary
01:39:34 RandySeaver: When I save the handout, I edit the file name for speaker name and title of the talk. Example: “Thomas Macentee – Using pinterest”
01:39:44 RandySeaver: It was the same thing as last year.
01:40:02 HilaryGadsby: Yvonne I will try after the webinar
01:41:40 Yvonne Demoskoff: Thanks, Hilary!
01:42:16 Dawn Carlile: That is what I did last year. I copy the title off the screen.

[NOTE:Here’s a Google Map of downtown Salt Lake City. Br sure to look for Harmon’s, our local grocery store with the great deli-department we mentioned during this show.]


01:43:53 HilaryGadsby: Going to Blue Lemon for Commonwealth Dinner this year
01:45:08 Yvonne Demoskoff: The Holiday Inn Express is across the street from the south entrance to the Salt Palace; very convenient
01:45:22 Dawn Carlile: Blue Iguana is excellent for Mexican food and the Siegried’s Deli is great.
01:46:29 Dawn Carlile: And they have a food court with lots of options at City Creek.
01:47:53 Dawn Carlile: If you need exercise you can walk to Harmon’s where they have a wonderful salad bar and you can eat upstairs or take it with you.
01:49:12 Yvonne Demoskoff: My husband and I bought a few food items from Harmon’s to bring back to our room at the hotel.
01:50:17 Linda Stufflebean: Hope the GeneaBloggers meet for lunch again at the Blue Lemon. [Yes, we will meet on Tuesday for lunch at 1pm.]
01:50:39 Cheri Passey: Me too. Linda!
01:51:05 HilaryGadsby: I need to check how to get from airport to The Radisson

01:51:21 Cousin Russ: One county’s switch to unalterable .PDF-A from microfilm – http://m.thecourierexpress.com/news/state/changing-of-the-guard-county-microfilm-department-going-digital/article_7951da66-ea95-596a-adb5-25bc105ab03b.html

TRAX logo
01:51:34 Lisa Gorrell: Hilary, you can ride the TRAX. [ This is the link to the Trax website: https://www.rideuta.com/Services/TRAX ]
01:51:44 Lisa Gorrell: I’m at the Radisson, too.
01:52:38 RandySeaver: We use the Express Shuttle service to/from SLC airport – only $10 per person
01:53:14 HilaryGadsby: When do you arrive?

GenChat
01:53:54 Cousin Russ: http://www.genealogygenchat.com/ #genchat
01:54:31 Cheri Passey: #genchat is so much fun! I call it the fastest hour in genealogy! I learn something new every time!
01:55:31 HilaryGadsby: I like Genchat but wrong time for me in the UK participate when I remember if I can

01:57:09 HilaryGadsby: I have used tweetdeck in the past
01:59:27 Cheri Passey: I use Tweetchat.com . One you enter the hashtag and join the group, it automatically puts it in for you.

02:00:23 RandySeaver: I’ve used Tweetchat and you get only the #genchat items in last first order. You can upload your message too.
02:00:41 Cheri Passey: Anna, that just means it will tweet into the chat with your account. It doesn’t produce tweets for you, it just shares what you tweet into the group.
02:03:15 AnnaMatthews: Thank you, Cheri. That’s good to know because I wanted to check it out.
02:03:42 Cousin Russ: The Legal Genealogist Judy Russell discusses obtaining DNA from a deceased relative. http://www.legalgenealogist.com/2018/01/28/another-look-at-dna-life-after-death/

02:08:19 HilaryGadsby: I might make it to Game Night in February
02:09:25 HilaryGadsby: I will miss MwM on Monday after RootsTech as will be travelling home from SLC.

02:10:43 Cousin Russ: @laurie_pratt writes A Letter to a Stranger https://threebranchtree.com/2017/02/07/a-letter-to-a-stranger/ #dna #genealogy
02:09:58 June Butka: It is a well written letter.
02:10:16 RandySeaver: I will miss the 2/26 MwM because I will be flying in after noon that day.

UN Holocaust
02:11:46 Cousin Russ: United Nations Department of Public Information 2018 Holocaust Remembrance Calendar of Events http://www.un.org/en/holocaustremembrance/2018/calendar2018.html
02:12:05 Cousin Russ: MyHeritage CEO Gilad Japhet Tells the Stories of His Ancestors Who Were Victims of the Holocaust https://blog.myheritage.com/2018/01/our-ceo-gilad-japhet-tells-the-stories-of-his-ancestors-who-were-victims-of-the-holocaust

02:15:15 Susan Bleimehl: Excellent show today. Thanks everyone!


The conversation continues herehttps://plus.google.com/+DearmyrtlePage/posts/Hrcfhk9qzc1

 

FamilySearch: What’s new for 2018

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: The following was received from our friends at FamilySearch.

Salt Lake City, Utah (22 January 2018), FamilySearch is a global leader in fun, online family history services with over 9 million users in 2017. In 2018 FamilySearch will be expanding its free site and services by adding new family discoveries, more online connections, expanded global reach, and millions of new sources to search. (Find and share this announcement online from the FamilySearch Newsroom).

1.   Personalized Home Page

Refinements to the FamilySearch personalized home page will enable signed-in patrons to make many more new discoveries and easily engage with their family trees.

As new photos, stories, or documents are added by other members of the family, they will be shown on your personalized home page and prioritized based on relevance. You will also be able to see new additions as relatives add them.

Enjoy more adaptive, relevant FamilySearch Record Hints. As millions of new records are added to FamilySearch weekly, the search engine maps them with your family tree. FamilySearch will specifically begin looking for new ancestor record sources you don’t already have in your tree. It will be easier than ever to add them.

Relevant ancestor event notifications, if you want, will be able to prompt you throughout the year regarding relevant dates in the lives of your ancestors. These can be great nudges to learn more about your forbears.

2.   Historical Records

FamilySearch will digitally preserve over 400 million images in 2018 and publish the majority of them online. It will also add hundreds of millions of indexed, searchable names in historical records, thus making it easier and faster to find your ancestors.

New additions will include prominent international collections from Europe, Central and South America, and the United States. New images will first be accessible in the FamilySearch Catalog Viewer. Once they are indexed or have additional metadata, they’ll be published in the FamilySearch Historical Record Collections.

3.   Online Discovery Experiences

FamilySearch will introduce fun, new personal “discovery” experiences online and in additional physical locations in 2018. The online experiences will be similar to the popular attractions currently found in select FamilySearch Family Discovery Centers.

4.    Family Tree

Refinements to the FamilySearch Family Tree in 2018 will extend its reach globally to more devices through improved language support and making the service faster and easier to navigate in lower bandwidth regions of the world.

An underlying goal of the FamilySearch Family Tree is to ensure new developments regarding data are always converging towards more accuracy and completeness.

An upcoming feature will help improve collaboration while encouraging more sound edits and discouraging poor edits to good data.    

5.  Family Tree Mobile App

FamilySearch will continue to update its FamilySearch Family Tree app and mobile experiences, which extend the website’s functionality. Currently, the robust app has 90 percent of the functionality of the web feature.

The app will provide fun, location-based experiences for making family discoveries wherever you happen to be. The popular 2017 “Relatives Around Me” feature allowed crowds or groups to discover who in the crowd was related to them and how.

New experiences in 2018 will build upon this, allowing interaction based on your proximity to people or locations with which you have a personal ancestral relationship.

The app will also continue to enhance the research capabilities of the mobile experience, including a new Research Mode that will allow multiple windows to be opened simultaneously to facilitate multitasking and research from within the app.

6.    Memories

Individuals are now uploading millions of family photos and documents for free permanent storage at FamilySearch. In 2018, patrons will be able to add multiple photos to a family story, rather than just one.

The FamilySearch Tree Fan Chart will help patrons, at a glance, easily discover areas in their tree where memories and sources are attached to ancestors, and help them identify opportunities where they need to be added.

7.   FamilySearch Web-Based Indexing

FamilySearch will end its desktop indexing software in 2018 as it continues to roll out more updates to its new web indexing platform. The new web tool is easy to use and works with any digital device (besides cell phones) with a web browser. It enables hundreds of thousands of volunteers worldwide to make millions of historical images easily and freely searchable by name so online family history researchers can quickly discover ancestors.

8.  RootsTech

RootsTech, hosted by FamilySearch International, will continue to expand its support of community growth, personal development, and exciting industry innovation. This popular global family history conference will attract over 100,000 attendees (in-person and live online viewers).

Keynotes this year will include: Scott Hamilton, olympic figure skating champion, Brandon Stanton, Humans of New York photographer and writer, Dr. Henry Louis Gates, Finding Your Roots. and Natalia Fourcade, internationally renowned Mexican pop-rock singer.

The RootsTech Innovation Showcase will highlight exciting innovations related to family history. It will replace the Innovator Summit and Innovator Showdown.

9.   Oral Histories

Family history in oral (no written documentation) cultures are kept in the minds of village elders—walking, human libraries. When they pass away, the library is lost forever. FamilySearch will increase the number of oral histories it captures from these tribal historians significantly throughout Africa.

FamilySearch appreciates its growing customer base (over 134 million visits in 2017!). When you visit FamilySearch in 2018, be sure to sign in to your free account to enjoy the most of what FamilySearch has to offer. Come back regularly to add your own family memories. Enjoy the new content added daily and the new features coming soon. Collaborate with your family to upload your favorite photos, documents, personal histories, or journals from previous years, and update your ancestors’ stories.

 

FamilySearch: New Web-Based Indexing Tool

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: The following was received from our friends at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch Web indexing Screen Shot

IMAGE: Web Indexing Tool Screen Shot, courtesy of FamilySearch.org.

Salt Lake City, Utah (25 September 2017), FamilySearch International, a leader in historical records preservation, has launched its new web-based indexing tool. Indexing is a technology used to make the world’s historical records freely searchable online for family history research. The new program makes it easier for online volunteers to participate using web-enabled computers, laptops, or tablets, and enables FamilySearch to expedite its online publishing of completed indexes. (Find and share this announcement and its graphics online in the FamilySearch Newsroom).

New features enable volunteers to work on tablets, modify the layout of their dashboard based on personal preferences, set and track individual goals, and create groups with friends or others interested in working on a common project.

Global nonprofit FamilySearch digitally preserves billions of historical records online to help individuals with their family history research. It has published billions of images of historic records from all over the world online. Researchers can find the record images in FamilySearch’s Catalog or Historic Records Collections online. But searching through billions of images online in search of one’s elusive ancestors is not fun for the average person. They want to type in an ancestor’s name and known context, press Enter, and voilà, see highly matched results from their search query.

“That requires an index,” said Jim Ericson, marketing manager for FamilySearch Indexing. “Until the records are indexed online, they can only be discovered by browsing through often enormous collections of digital images. With a digital index, researchers can locate records in seconds by using a person’s name and other helpful information as search terms. A searchable index saves researchers time and effort by returning search results from the entire collection in a matter of seconds.”

Ericson says the new web-based indexing platform will enable more volunteers to participate worldwide and increase the rate at which FamilySearch can make indexed records accessible online. “It is a straight-forward experience that no longer requires people to download software,” said Ericson.

Using the new tool enables volunteer indexers to help make it possible for millions of people to have personal family history discoveries quickly with just a few keystrokes. Indexing also fuels hints, a new feature on FamilySearch.org that makes finding records even easier by mapping indexed records against a person’s family tree and sharing high probability ancestral matches with them.

The web-based indexing program also has new built-in helps, plus a lab section that allows you to test upcoming product features and enhancements for the new program.

For first-time volunteers, simple training provides step-by-step instructions. To participate, go to FamilySearch.org/indexing, and click the link to web indexing.

RELATED
Check out or plan to participate in the Worldwide Indexing EventOctober 20-22, 2017.

FamilySearch Why Indexing Maters infographic

About FamilySearch
FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 5,000 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

FamilySearch: 2017 Worldwide Indexing Project

Look what FamilySearch has planned for 20-22 October 2017 – the annual Worldwide Indexing Event.

Here’s the link to register –  https://www.familysearch.org/IndexingEvent2017?icid=bl-wi17-6598

You may use either the web or desktop indexing interface. The web version allow those who have Chromebooks to participate.

Congrats to the Western Massachusetts Genealogical Society for leading the way. They’re planning a training session of 16 Oct 2017 in the computer lab at the Agwam Senior Center, 954 Main Street, Agawam, Massachusetts.

DearMYRTLE's Profile PicMyrt’s Musings
One way to “pay it forward” is to index records so others can more readily find documents mentioning their ancestors.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt     🙂
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.


For Further Reading (I guess you could say we’ve done a bit of indexing over the years!)