FamilySearch: Correcting Misspelled Names

Just attended a Facebook Live with FamilySearch’s Ron Tanner. He made the following statements, paraphrased below.

On selected indexed image sets at FamilySearch you can now correct misspelled names in the index.

When viewing the image, scroll down to the bottom where the index list is shown. Click on the appropriate entry, type your correction and specify if it’s an index error or if the original document is in error.

Ron said It will take much time before this is rolled out to all indexed image sets, since FamilySearch engineers must first work the next 18 months or so update the backend architecture.

Where can you turn for help?

When your research takes you to a “new” locality, get oriented by studying that place in the Research Wiki at FamilySearch.

1. SEARCH AT THE COUNTRY LEVEL – The United States is just one of over 120+ national level FamilySearch Wiki pages.

FamilySearch Wiki landing page

IMAGE: Portion of the FamilySearch Research Wiki landing page.

2. SEARCH AT THE STATE OR PROVINCE LEVEL – Note the navigation categories below the Washington State flag include beginning research help; links to record types; references to the history of the locale, maps, migration routes; info about major ethnic groups; and lists of local libraries, archives and societies.

IMAGE: Part of the Washington State page in the FamilySearch Research Wiki.

3. SEARCH AT THE COUNTY LEVEL – Remember Louisiana has parishes instead of counties. Note in this example from Washington State the extinct and renamed counties are listed.

IMAGE: Clickable map of Washington State counties. From the FamilySearch Research Wiki.

4. SEARCH AT THE TOWNSHIP OR CITY LEVEL – Some states like Virginia have independent cities that aren’t in a county.

5. SEARCH BY ETHNIC OR RELIGIOUS GROUP – perhaps Quakers.

The FamilySearch Research Wiki includes suggestions of high priority record sets even when FamilySearch does not have the records in its collection. Study the Wiki’s timeline of significant events in the history of the place, descriptions of the local court system and links to related training videos in the FamilySearch Learning Center. The Wiki indicates libraries, archives and organizations that may have resources for your continuing research.

The Wiki is not the place to search by an ancestor’s name, rather it is the place to learn about the locality where your ancestors once lived and discover surviving record sets that may mention your progenitors.

IMAGE: Beginning dates for various record sets. From the Research Wiki at FamilySearch.

It will literally take you years to work through all the suggestions in the the Research Wiki at FamilySearch. 🤗

https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/Main_Page

FamilySearch: Chinese Genealogy Workshop

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: The following was just received by our friends at FamilySearch.org


Salt Lake City, Utah (20 February 2019), FamilySearch is hosting a free Chinese Genealogy workshop at the Family History Library on Thursday, May 9th, 2019, 1:00 pm – 6:00 pm. (MDT). The event is being held in conjunction with the celebration of the 150th anniversary of the driving of the Golden Spike at Promontory Summit, Utah, in 1869. Many Chinese workers were instrumental in the construction of the transcontinental railroads. The Library is located at 35 North West Temple Street in downtown Salt Lake City. Seating is limited. Registration is required for this free workshop.

Over 150 years ago, thousands of Chinese immigrants labored arduously to construct the transcontinental railroad—a historic connection of the Central Pacific and Union Pacific railroads at Promontory Summit, Utah. Today, many of their Chinese-American descendants are trying to trace their roots back to China.

IMAGE: Professor Ava Chin

The FamilySearch Chinese Genealogy Workshop will offer hands-on learning about the largest collection of Chinese family history records outside of mainland China and present ways for Chinese Americans to discover and connect their Chinese ancestors.

Keynote speaker Professor Ava Chin, an award-winning author, New York Times columnist, lecturer and “Urban Forager,” will speak about her experiences as a descendant of a Chinese railroad worker.

Workshop Schedule:  

Time Event 
1:00 pm –1:15 pm Welcome by FamilySearch
1:15 pm – 2:00 pm Keynote with Ava Chin

Being a Descendant of a Chinese Railroad Worker

2:00 pm – 2:45 pm Workshop with Henry Tom

Best Practices for Overseas Chinese Research

2:45 pm – 3:30 pm Workshop with Amy Chin

Sources to use for Chinese American Research

3:30 pm – 3:45 pm Break
3:45 pm – 4:00 pm Demonstration

Scanning of Chinese Jiapu

4:00 pm – 5:00 pm Dr. Mel Thatcher / Lena Stout

Using the resources of FamilySearch

5:00 pm – 6:00 pm Tour of the Family History Library

To register for the workshop, please go to EventBrite.com>FamilySearch Chinese Genealogy Workshop.
(Find and easily share this announcement in the FamilySearch Newsroom.

RELATED  

2019 Golden Spike Conference, sponsored by Chinese Railroad Workers Descendants Association

About FamilySearch

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 5,000 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.


 

FamilySearch: Records Update 28 Jan 2019

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: The following was just received from our friends at FamilySearch.org.


New Historical Records on FamilySearch: Week of January 28, 2019

SALT LAKE CITY, UT—FamilySearch added new, free historical records this week from Austria, Brazil, Cape Verde, England, France, Italy (Mantova, Terni, and Vicenza), Netherlands, South Africa, and the United States (Maine and Missouri). (Easily find and share this announcement online in the FamilySearch Newsroom).

Search these new, free records and images by clicking on the collection links below, or go to FamilySearch to search over 8 billion free names and record images.

Country Collection Indexed Records Digital Images Comments
Austria Austria, Carinthia, Gurk Diocese, Catholic Church Records, 1527-1986 75,102 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
Brazil Brazil, São Paulo, Immigration Cards, 1902-1980 2,120 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
Cape Verde Cape Verde, Catholic Church Records, 1787-1957 19,477 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
England England, Devon and Cornwall Marriages, 1660-1912 319 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
France France, Convict Register, 1650-1867 48,409 0 New indexed records collection
Italy Italy, Mantova, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1496-1906 34,729 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
Italy Italy, Terni, Civil Registration, 1861-1921 123,204 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
Italy Italy, Vicenza, Bassano del Grappa, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1871-1942 120,752 0 New indexed records collection
Netherlands Netherlands, Noord-Holland, Civil Registration, 1811-1950 55,943 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection
South Africa South Africa, Transvaal, Civil Death, 1869-1954 134,526 0 New indexed records collection
United States Maine, Tombstone Inscriptions, Surname Index, 1620-2014 129,668 0 New indexed records collection
United States Missouri, Civil Marriages, 1820-1874 785 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/indexing.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 5,000 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.


 

ARCHIVED: WACKY Wednesday – FamilySearch Catalog

WACKYWednesdayPromo

We consider logical research patterns as one would transition from an Ancestry Member Tree to digital records on FamilySearch.org. Participate in an unscripted, open discussion hosted by DearMYRTLE’s very distant cousin Annie Oakmont.

EMBEDDED VIDEO

SELECTED TEXT

00:32:58 Deb Andrew: Good evening.

00:34:22 Marceline Beem: Hi everyone

00:34:58 Melissa Barker: Hello Everyone!

00:40:54 Betty-Lu Burton: It also shows the Cousin Russ is aware that FamilySearch and Ancestry have different records group

00:43:44 Betty-Lu Burton: You can also look in the 1871 and 1881 census. Both would show the family he was living with, place of birth and religion 00:51:50 Betty-Lu Burton: The Canadian Censuses has been indexed just like the USA Census Records.

Betty-Lu Burton: Unless he came with his parents, their name would not be listed on his border crossing record

01:02:25 Deb Andrew: Just don’t ask Siri if there are any airplanes over your location!

01:02:51 Betty-Lu Burton: Do you know when and where he was married? Marriage records might give you information on parents

01:06:40 Betty-Lu Burton: Have you considered that Herbert’s parents were not married and McAlister is his mother’s maiden name or McAlister is his father’s surname and Johnston his mother’s maiden name

01:11:03 Betty-Lu Burton: You might try looking for Herbert in the 1871 census to see if he is listed with his parents now or with another family. This might help decide if his parents may have been dead in 1861. It would also tell you if he is still with the same family

01:14:21 Betty-Lu Burton: Modern gun hunting starts Saturday here in Arkansas

01:19:16 Deb Andrew: You had the most interesting Fudge Pie Recipe.

01:21:21 Melissa Barker: Thanks Deb!

01:25:38 Betty-Lu Burton: Stamp number is the page in the book, the image number is where it is (the page) on the microfilm

01:27:53 Betty-Lu Burton: Could you have looked in the land records to find out when the land was sold for the probate and would not that give you a better idea of when the probate happened?

01:30:12 Deb Andrew: I put surname first followed by state, county and then date.

1:34:09 Deb Andrew: I had a grand uncle who had to register for World War I will he was at Wetumpka State Prison, in Alabama.

01:34:21 Betty-Lu Burton: The register of prisoners should also be in the catalogue listed as item 2 on the microfilm

01:36:09 Betty-Lu Burton: some of the microfilms can have several different items that are not related, but each one is listed in the catalogue with the item number. Or at least it was like this before everything was digitized.

01:38:02 Cousin Russ: FamilySearch Catalog Film/Fiche Number Search https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/…

01:38:11 Cousin Russ: FamilySearch Catalog Locality Subject Subdivisions https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/…

01:38:17 Cousin Russ: Deciphering FamilySearch Catalog Entries https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/…

01:38:28 Cousin Russ: Abbreviations in the FamilySearch Catalog – https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/…

01:38:42 Cousin Russ: I didn’t know you could search like that by Debbie Gurtler https://www.familysearch.org/ask/lear…

01:38:49 Cousin Russ: FamilySearch Catalog Call Number Search https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/…

01:38:55 Cousin Russ: FamilySearch Catalog Film/Fiche Number Search https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/…

01:39:54 Susan Bleimehl: Thanks for all these links–I’m working with a couple of newbees and this will be extremely helpful for them.


DearMYRTLE's Profile Pic
Myrt’s Musings

For future reference, this is the link to DearMYRTLE’s Event Calendar –http://dearmyrtle.com/blog2/index.php/calendar

Here’s the link to the GeneaWebinars Blog & Calendar of other genealogy webinars, chats and hangouts – http://blog.geneawebinars.com/p/calendar.html

ARCHIVED
Most DearMYRTLE Webinars are embedded in a Myrt’s Musings blog post, along with selected comments and links we mention.