ARCHIVED: Mondays with Myrt – 27 Aug 2018

MondaysWithMyrt

NOTE: Last week we tackled the proposed business tax cut that would close the Allen County Public Library. I followed up with the post “Contact Info: Ft. Wayne City Council About Library Budget Cut.” Since Monday and publication of this post, about 15 people reported the city council initiative did not pass, so services will not be cut. See: Dick Eastman’s Fort Wayne City Council Votes 6-3 against Business Tax Proposal, Saving the Allen County Public Library and Other County-funded Agencies.

This week we talk about:

  • FamilySearch’s Compare-a-Face
  • Society skills night
  • Should societies add a virtual component to regular meetings?
  • FindMyPast’s newest databases
  • Society newsletters – are yours digital?
  • Genealogy podcasts

EMBEDDED VIDEO

SELECTED TEXT

10:00:51 From Sheryl Whisenhunt : Good Crisp Morning to All.
10:01:06 From Deb Andrew : Good Morning
10:01:42 From Robbin Smith : Good mornng from wrm and humid miami
10:01:52 From Betty-Lu Burton : Good morning
10:01:55 From JoAnn Lawrencw : Good Afternoon from New Jersey
10:02:35 From Hilary Gadsby to All panelists : I could talk about the new global family tree at find my past
10:02:59 From Rebecca Williams : Good afternoon from London, Ohio.

10:03:40 From Cousin Russ : FindMyPast’s friday blog post that Hilary explores 

 https://blog.findmypast.co.uk/find-2598414060.html
10:03:48 From Kathleen Daetsch : Good afternoon fron NYC
10:04:24 From grahamwalter : FindMyPast was originally 1837Online.com and started as part of the research arm of “Title Research” a heir hunter type of company.
10:07:09 From Randy Seaver : I use Findmypast for British Isles records – parish records, civil reg, census, and more. The RootsMagic WebHints for Findmypast are useful, but the search seems to be exact only. Using the search fields can be confusing and cumbersome.
10:10:45 From Randy Seaver : What’s been helpful to me in my WDYTYA project is the sets of baptisms and burials for a specific county that were developed from parish registers that are not in the IGI. An index, but helpful to find in FamilySearch digital microfilm.
10:18:51 From grahamwalter : double arrow mean can be sorted; one arrow indicates the sorted column

10:26:10 From Cousin Russ : https://westmagenealogy.com/

10:26:52 From Randy Seaver : My Chula vista society is not willing to shut out about 15 members from the newsletter so we mailo to them. Newsletter is 10 pages, so one 50 cent stamp and five sheets of paper. We don’t charge them extra for the mailing.
10:28:56 From Cousin Russ : https://chulavistagenealogysociety.wildapricot.org/
10:29:35 From Cousin Russ : San Diego Genealogical Society https://casdgs.org/
10:30:05 From Cousin Russ : Chula Vista Genealogical Society https://chulavistagenealogysociety.wildapricot.org
10:30:07 From Marian Koalski : Randy, Is there a particular officer, separate from the newsletter editor, who does the printing and mailing of newsletters?
10:30:24 From Betty-Lu Burton : There is still a need for the option of receiving a hard copy. there are still many people who do not have the internet
10:31:07 From John Laws to All panelists : LAWS FAMILY REGISTER sent newsletters 30 years ago now we blog www.lawsandlawes.blogspot.com love to go live on Zoom
10:31:55 From cyndy Bray : Ancestors are from Taunton and New Bedford. I’m thinking this is probably not Westerm Mass?
10:32:18 From Randy Seaver : Marian, I do the printing and mailing as Newsletter Editor – takes 45 minutes on a Monday afternoon at the local UPS Store. We send 15 out and print 10-15 more for handouts at our meetings and events.
10:32:50 From Marcia Philbrick to All panelists : Publishing a newsletter is a major issue for smaller societies. I volunteer at the local historical society that publishes a quarterly newsletter. About half of the members want it in print.
10:33:07 From Marian Koalski : Randy, I’ve found that to be a discouraging chore for anyone who would otherwise agree to be the newsletter editor.
10:33:50 From Cousin Russ : http://lawsandlawes.blogspot.com/
10:34:02 From Deb Andrew to All panelists : The society I belong to only g charges for the snail mail version of the newsletter,e-mail is free.
10:34:16 From Randy Seaver : When we only had the mail option before email, it was a challenge to send out 100 copies – 3 persons working for an hour to print, staple, fold, label, and stamp 100 copies. SDGS had a bigger team and their own copier to send out to 600 members.
10:34:32 From Dave Robison to All panelists : Cyndy Bray, you’re right. Taunton and New Bedford are Eastern Massachusetts. But they are each only about 80-90 miles away. We’re a small state!
10:35:11 From Marian Koalski : Yes, thank goodness more people are able to do email these days.
10:35:41 From Randy Seaver : Dave, is there a society in Plymouth and/or Bristol County? I know Barnstable has the Cape cod GS
10:37:05 From Janet Iles to All panelists : For our county historical society we publish two issues a year 16 to 24 pages each. Of 92 that go out 36 get them by email and 53 by mail and 3 get both. We send it to a printer. I as the one who puts it together, I go to the printers and then prepare the large envelopes and then mail them.
10:38:18 From Betty-Lu Burton : In Arkansas there are placcing without internet or poor internet connections
10:38:24 From Jacqueline Wilson : I belong to a society (Chicago Corral of the Westerners) – a lot of members do not own a computer!
10:38:35 From Linda Jordan to All panelists : Also, many don’t like reading online.
10:38:46 From John Laws to All panelists : Most folk without internet can get it thro their labrary or city hall
10:39:14 From Marian Koalski : There is probably a Bristol County (Mass.) chapter of the Mass. Society of Genealogists…not sure whether they have a newsletter.
10:40:38 From Randy Seaver : The other problem with online is using columns – we do everything in one column for text
10:40:53 From Randy Seaver : amd photos and tables
10:41:11 From John Laws : We don’t want pretty stick, so stick to Times New Roman
10:41:28 From Denise Coughlin : Dave, do y’all do your newsletter in Word or Google Docs?
10:41:29 From Marcia Philbrick : Do you send newsletters out as PDF files or do you create a ‘newsletter’ in the email.
10:41:30 From Barbara woolston : To add another viewpoint, the only way I can read is online with a dark background. I have had retinal detachments in both eyes and I am so thankful I have this medium to read.
10:42:45 From Marcia Philbrick : Randy, did I hear you say you use a 14 size font
10:42:48 From Randy Seaver : We send the newsletter as a PDF va email. We use photos and color backgrounds.
10:42:48 From Rebecca Williams : Contrast is a big deal. I have seen websites that I could not read because they had a black or darkblue background and small yellow or white type.
10:43:42 From JoAnn Lawrencw : Color of the print is very important. Red and gray are hard to view. I can enlarge the page so it is easier to read.
10:43:56 From Marcia Philbrick : Randy, is your newsletter behind your pay wall or is it public when you post it on the web?
10:44:30 From Randy Seaver : The CVGS newsletter is beyond the pay wall for two months, and free to see by non=-members after two months. It’s a dumb policy IMHO
10:44:42 From Launa : Bad eyes plus font size makes a very big difference for me. even went to different keyboard because of bad eyes, Keyboard has back lighting,.
10:45:02 From John Laws : Sadly I don’t have a pay wall
10:47:00 From Robbin Smith : IMHO societies shoud only keep databases they may have created behind pay wall
10:47:25 From JoAnn Lawrencw : Before you change your website, please check with someone who is visual limited. Some new changes block us out. Watch the color of print. No red on pink.
10:47:32 From Jim Everhart : Here is our Current that was mailed today, https://smhstn.org/ Members can download any past Journal, andthe PDF is now searchable
10:48:06 From Rebecca Williams : Robin, I completely agree. Newsletters shouldn’t be hidden behind pay walls.
10:48:18 From Janet Iles to All panelists : Our newsletter is a benefit of membership. For upcoming events etc. the historical society uses its website and Facebook to advertise events as well as the year’s meetings are advertized in a brochure that is put into libraries and cultural venues. Our newsletter is more of than just news but it includes articles.
10:48:53 From Valerie Lisk : Couldn’t John do a GoFundMe page, or Patheon to bring in enough money to pay for internet, phone etc?
10:48:56 From Dave Robison to All panelists : Good point, JoAnn. Fortunately, I’m very sensitive to readability. Thanks for underscoring the fact that not everyone have perfect 20/20 vision! including me, by the way…
10:49:03 From Hilary Gadsby : Many societies have members only areas but usually for access to records not newsletters advertising events.
10:49:09 From Randy Seaver : JoAnn – thanks for that input. I’ve never heard that before. apparently, our CVGS members don’t have a problem or I would have heard about it. Is red on white background OK? What about bluel inks on white background?
10:49:20 From Marian Koalski : Jim, that’s a good-looking site.
10:50:34 From John Laws : Used to have 150 people behind a payway
10:50:40 From Jim Everhart : Consider a membership should offer bennefits for your membership helps fund= access to extra material.
10:50:56 From Hilary Gadsby : I get society journals from the societies that I belong to some are just online.
10:50:57 From Jim Everhart : Thanks
10:53:21 From Marian Koalski : Making queries available to more people increases the value of a membership
10:53:58 From JoAnn Lawrencw : Randy:If you use a dark background watch the type of font (letter close together is hard to read). Black background with red print is very hard to read.
10:54:06 From June Butka : That looks like the Colby Asscciation Newsletter I recieve.
10:56:34 From John Laws : Hoping to get an interview on Next Gen more cousin bait co I got loads of US content just take a look at the blog just Google LAWS FAMILY REGISTER
10:57:37 From Marian Koalski : A newsletter editor can put clickable links into PDFs.
10:57:56 From John Laws : So much more interactive than a printed Newsletter
10:59:33 From Deb Andrew : I can see Pike”s Peak from my house.
11:00:02 From Randy Seaver : JoAnn, thanks. I use white and light pastel backgrounds becuase I have to make black and white printouts. I guess i’m OK.
11:00:04 From June Butka : Well done Dave carrying the ball so well.
11:00:45 From DearMYRTLE to All panelists : randy’s topic is next
11:03:30 From Marian Koalski : Do you need a skills segment of each meeting or each newsletter?
11:04:14 From June Butka : Up state New York would is my son in laws line.
11:04:27 From Randy Seaver : The Skills from 10 years ago are different from those required now. Think about DNA, Digital microfilm, Searching databases, Family trees, Hints, etc.
11:04:43 From Marian Koalski : Yes, indeed, Randy!

11:04:55 From Cousin Russ : https://www.nergc.org/2019-conference/
11:05:23 From Randy Seaver : Webinars, Podcasts, YouTube, Google, blogs, Facebook, etc.
11:05:42 From Cousin Russ : https://www.geneamusings.com/2018/08/a-maiden-name-for-veldora-seaver-1857.html
11:09:51 From John Laws : Thats it Get to the original record not just the transcription
11:11:58 From John Laws : Thats what its all about Randy
11:14:04 From June Butka : cabotcandy on 6/26/2014 this is what comes up when you click on submitted by on Veldora Death certificate hint.
11:15:10 From Marian Koalski : I just tried clicking on the blue “Veldora Seaver” name in the summary of the death certificate on Ancestry. It does give the username of the person who posted the corrected name, and it is also clickable.
11:15:12 From June Butka : I did that this morning. I match my 3rd great grandfather.
11:15:31 From Betty-Lu Burton : June that looks like the username and possibly the date the alternate name was added

FamilySearch Compare-a-Face
11:15:42 From June Butka : 14% with one photo and 20 % for another photo
11:17:27 From JoAnn Lawrencw : Compare-a Face is a great way to compare your face to an unknown person in a family picture. I used it to compare a picture of my great grandfather to my grandfather and dad. They all looked alike when young.
11:18:01 From June Butka : Correct Betty. The alternate name person is who you want to check of they are family. ie “Cousin bait.”
11:18:16 From June Butka : under discovery
11:18:20 From Valerie Lisk : If you have two photos and you don’t know who they are, will it tell you if they are related?
11:18:31 From Randy Seaver : Janqueline, not really, it’s one big tree. You can use FS Family Tree to help you find ancestors of DNA matches.
11:18:42 From Marian Koalski : I think you need the link that was in the email from FamilySearch
11:18:51 From Randy Seaver : Sorry, Jacqueline, darn figners.
11:19:07 From grahamwalter : It’s on the Discovery page
11:19:11 From June Butka : https://www.familysearch.org/discovery/
11:19:24 From June Butka : Discovery
11:19:42 From Molly McKinley : discovery/compare
11:19:55 From June Butka : googled familysearch discovery or under gallery
11:19:56 From John Laws : My Great Grandfather LAWS looks more like Russ than me, tho’ I have one of my Grandfathers grandfather brother signs his name not unlike me
11:20:09 From Doris Haskell : Is it an app?
11:20:09 From Jacqueline Wilson : Go up a little bit on the screen you were just on.
11:20:54 From Molly McKinley : maybe they only send it to those who have a tree online there
11:21:25 From Marian Koalski : It might be just a temporary offering
11:22:15 From Jacqueline Wilson : It is on that page at the top!!!!
11:24:01 From Randy Seaver : My top match is my grandmother with 50%!

PODCASTS How many attendees are into podcasts?

11:24:52 From Marian Koalski : me
11:24:55 From grahamwalter : I do
11:24:58 From Robbin Smith : i listen to them
11:25:02 From June Butka : I do.
11:25:03 From Valerie Lisk : I do.
11:25:06 From Molly McKinley : 3 or 4 times a week
11:25:09 From Denise Coughlin : All the time! I listen at work and on my LONG commute!
11:25:12 From Jim Everhart : all the time
11:25:16 From Pamela Wells : yes, I do
11:25:17 From Marian Koalski : Actually I listen to them on my computer
11:25:29 From Jacqueline Wilson : I don’t. For some reason it reminds me of talk radio, which I dislike.
11:25:31 From Pamela Wells : Genealogy Gems
11:25:38 From Marian Koalski : Genealogy Guys
11:26:01 From Robbin Smith : extreme genes
11:26:04 From Valerie Lisk : Extreme Genes
11:26:15 From Randy Seaver : I listen occasionally – I like Extreme Genes
11:26:32 From Launa : used to download then burn to CD so I could listen when driving long distance,. Have you back to [1998?]
11:26:46 From Pamela Wells : Genealogy Guys
11:26:46 From Robbin Smith : ancesteral findings
11:26:53 From Randy Seaver : An hour is too long to listen. I’ll listen to 5-10 minutes
11:26:54 From Crystal Toenjes : I love podcasts for while I’m cooking or folding laundry.
11:27:19 From Pamela Wells : Genealogy Guys Podcast with George Morgan and Drew Smith
11:27:22 From Randy Seaver : Lisa Louise Cooke
11:27:40 From Hilary Gadsby : I rarely listen now but need to start doing this for my journey to and from work
11:27:45 From Rachel Evans : I listen to podcasts while I’m doing things around the house. It’s good because you don’t have to sit still. I love Forget Me Not.

11:28:10 From Cousin Russ : Lori Lyn Price did a masterful job this week putting the human face on Hub History’s episode about the 1918 flu pandemic. “On August 27, 1918 Boston became acquainted with the epidemic that has gone down in history as the “Spanish flu.” A more accurate name for this disease outbreak might be the “Boston flu,” because our city is where this influenza variant mutated and first turned truly deadly.” http://www.hubhistory.com/episodes/pandemic-1918-episode-95/
11:28:20 From Pamela Wells : Cyndi’s List has a list
11:28:22 From Randy Seaver : I list the ones that have a blog post about them in my Genealogy News Bytes on Tuesday and Friday
11:28:32 From Robbin Smith : gnealogy news
11:28:52 From Robbin Smith : family tree magazne
11:29:15 From Launa : yes at hobby lobby
11:29:26 From Hilary Gadsby : I have Genealogy Gems app on my phone
11:29:54 From John Laws : https://www.radioshack.com/
11:30:11 From June Butka : Cydi’s list gives a list of Genealogy podcasts and other tidbits about them https://www.cyndislist.com/podcasts/general/


11:30:31 From Randy Seaver : Research Like a Pro is new podcast –
[from Family Locket] https://familylocket.com/category/research-tips/podcast/

11:30:41 From Dave Robison  : I gave her the story of my great grandfather who died as a result of the pandemic. He wasn’t sick he was hit by a train on his way to pick up a nurse to take care of his household!
11:30:43 From Hilary Gadsby : My gt unle died of the flu his wife was expecting their youngest child
11:30:52 From Jacqueline Wilson : Chicago still has Radio Shacks!
11:31:21 From June Butka : Sending Hugs duck tape.
11:33:38 From Marian Koalski : Hilary, mine too!
11:34:59 From Jacqueline Wilson : I already signed for that!
11:35:37 From Hilary Gadsby : I will be away next week
11:36:21 From Sheryl Whisenhunt : Thank you, Myrtle, take care and continue improving. And, thank you Cousin Russ.
11:37:41 From Cheri Hudson Passey : Good to see you are feeling better!!


DearMYRTLE's Profile Pic
Myrt’s Musings

For future reference, this is the link to DearMYRTLE’s Event Calendar –http://dearmyrtle.com/blog2/index.php/calendar

Here’s the link to the GeneaWebinars Blog & Calendar of other genealogy webinars, chats and hangouts – http://blog.geneawebinars.com/p/calendar.html

ARCHIVED
Most DearMYRTLE Webinars are embedded in a Myrt’s Musings blog post, along with selected comments and links we mention.

COMMENT AFTER the webinar at http://bit.ly/DearMYRTLEonGoogle


 

ARCHIVED: Mondays with Myrt – 13 Aug 2018

MondaysWithMyrt

We first tackle the proposed cut that would close the Allen County Public Library. I followed up with the post “Contact Info: Ft. Wayne City Council About Library Budget Cut.” Other topics include:

  • Letters from the Dead –  the latest Jefferson Tate genealogy mystery book by Steve Robinson (Ol’ Myrt received hers as she was typing this post. YAY!)
  • More to the Fudge family photos story
  • Randy’s family photos – let’s remember to take them. (Ol’ Myrt had a big family gathering yesterday and totally forgot to take a single shot.) 
  • Ireland Valuation Books Translator
  • Accessing digital land records at FamilySearch that are not indexed with Randy Seaver’s best advice.
  • Wisconsin Area Research Centers
  • Authored works
  • Family bibles

EMBEDDED VIDEO

SELECTED COMMENTS

10:01:14 From John Laws : Good to be with you guys from a wet Scotland
10:01:17 From Barbara LaMarche to All panelists : Good Morning to all from HOT California.
10:01:48 From Graham Walter : Overcast but dry down near London
10:01:58 From Cousin Russ : From Dick Eastman’s blog “A Fort Wayne, Indiana, City Councilman Proposes Eliminating the Annual Budget for the Allen County Public Library” https://blog.eogn.com/2018/08/13/a-fort-wayne-indiana-city-councilman-proposes-eliminating-the-annual-budget-for-the-allen-county-public-library/amp/
10:02:11 From Marian Koalski : Whoa!
10:02:38 From Marian Koalski : I agree, Russ. Ask the downtown hotels and restaurants.
10:03:15 From Betty-Lu Burton : Does he not realize how many dollars they receive in people visiting the library? I am sure it is more then the annual budget
10:03:28 From Deb Andrew : They tried to do that here, did it for awhile, closed several branches. Then they had to reopen them all over again and buy new books.

FGS logo
10:03:31 From Cousin Russ : Federation of Genealogy Societies https://www.fgsconference.org
10:03:44 From Marian Koalski : The councilman is obviously not in touch with how much internet access the library provides to the public, including e-book borrowings.
10:03:53 From Abbie McDonough : My local library is not just used for reading. For example I go to craft meetings at my local library.
10:04:26 From Barbara LaMarche : Indiana has always been one of the most “Genea” friendly states.
10:04:40 From Marcia Philbrick : There are other public libraries encountering this exact same issue — do away with the annual budget. Even though these aren’t major genealogical libraries, they still likely have resources that genealogists rely on.
10:06:35 From Marian Koalski : Around here, the library is where we meet for book groups, kids’ classes in STEM, computer clubs, genealogy clubs, art displays, musical performances….
10:06:42 From Betty-Lu Burton : My local library provides many activities for children to help with learning and social skills
10:07:28 From Bill West : We had a similiar situation here. Someone wanted to reduce the library budget because “nobody reads anymore” The budget was kept the same and the town has built a new library,
10:08:29 From Marian Koalski : Who is the councilman’s opponent in the upcoming elections?
10:08:32 From Gloria Deison : My local library holds the historical town archive! (morning / evening all!)
10:08:51 From bobbi to All panelists : maybe this was good timing. they can make their presence known.
10:09:09 From Valerie Lisk to All panelists : MAAGI meets at Allen County annually. [Midwest African American Genealogy Institute]
10:09:55 From Yvonne Demoskoff : As an example, when my husband and I were in SLC this February for RootsTech, we spent money locally at restaurants, the mall, souvenirs, and at the planetarium
10:10:11 From Rachel Evans : They don’t understand people are on fixed incomes and can’t afford to buy books on Amazon. My mother is and she is at the library several times a week to get books.
10:10:12 From Hilary Gadsby : Too many small libraries get closed. We will end up with no place to find the recrds if this was to happen.
10:10:55 From Marian Koalski : I suppose that libraries could be viewed as subversive if politicians are afraid of having citizens talk to each other.
10:11:02 From Betty-Lu Burton : The best way is to show them that the library is more than just a book depository and can provide customers to local businesses
10:11:07 From Hilary Gadsby : Our libraries hold a lot more than books.
10:11:24 From Michelle Minner : Unfortunately I don’t think that people that live outside of the local area would have any “say” or vote in the issue. It has to be a community effort…and it has to be a grass roots activism (in my opinion)
10:13:37 From Marian Koalski : Dollars from outside of Allen County could be a form of activism.
10:14:00 From Bill West : One likes to think logic would prevailabout the library, but given recent history I am aconcerned.
10:14:44 From Melissa Barker : I am here listening in but have a cold, home from work.
10:15:07 From Marian Koalski : Remember gifts to local libraries when you write obituaries.
10:15:08 From Betty-Lu Burton : Melissa get better soon.

LettersFromTheDead
10:16:30 From Dave Robison : Letters from the Dead –  the latest Jefferson Tate genealogy mystery book by Steve Robinson

10:18:02 From Hilary Gadsby : More to the story of the bag full of Fudge family photos https://lynnswaffles.com/2018/08/09/fudge-park-and-ginn-family-part-2/

10:20:40 From Randy Seaver : Randy’s FB – https://www.facebook.com/Geneaholic

Ireland Valuation Books Translator

10:21:01 From Cousin Russ : Ireland Valuation Books Translator http://www.townlandvaluationtranslator.com

10:31:03 From Marian Koalski : We need someone who is the Professional Photo Reminder in the family, who will interrupt when needed to get it done.

10:32:03 From Cousin Russ : Land records –  “Finding David Auble’s Land Records in Sussex County, New Jersey” by Randy Seaver https://www.geneamusings.com/2018/08/finding-david-aubles-land-records-in.html
10:33:12 From Doris Haskell  : I have found great treasures in land records. Surprises. Been thinking about getting back into them again.
10:33:27 From Michelle Minner : Thank you, Randy! woo hoo! I am going to search the catalog for land records for my family! WOW
10:34:50 From Betty-Lu Burton : I found my 2 great grandfather’s estate packet recently on FamilySearch. Unfortunately the estate records only mentioned his second family and nothing about his first family. I come through the oldest daughter of the first family. Granted by the time he died all his children from the first family had married and had children of their own.
10:36:47 From John Laws : From an Will for my grandfather published in South Africa as he was the director in the London Office of Stutterfords of Jo’Burg I found two cousins unknown to me – EXCITED.
10:37:02 From Doris Haskell : Do you know if any land records have been indexed?
10:37:31 From Betty-Lu Burton : It is easier and faster to digitize a microfilm than to index it.
10:37:43 From June Butka : I found the index for Elijah Pease Probate docket 1 page 1210, unfortunately I can’t find the docket 1 record
10:39:57 From June Butka : Sometimes they fill in the pages at the end of a year with previous information from early times. Not always just the years listed.
10:41:58 From John Laws : Randy – You put me to shame
10:44:10 From Marcia Philbrick : Deeds are the one source that has helped me separate two men of the same name! I’m very thankful that the images are coming online.
10:44:13 From Doris Haskell to All panelists : Absolutely!
10:44:55 From Doris Haskell : It was the grantee index that led me to the second married name of my female ancestor.
10:48:27 From Randy Seaver : Jay Verkler is who I was thinking about
10:48:44 From Betty-Lu Burton : Both WW I and WW II had 3 different draft cards.
10:49:57 From Hilary Gadsby : I found someone on CEF record at Ancestry and it has numerous pages
10:50:57 From Cousin Russ : Carol – please post your question here
10:52:53 From Marian Koalski : Judging by the excitement, Randy, I think your campaign for studying the browsable records on FamilySearch is succeeding … and needs to continue.
10:53:19 From Randy Seaver : Here is a link to Jay Verkler’s visionary keynote talk at RootsTech 2012 about FamilySearch viasion for the genea-future – https://www.geneamusings.com/2012/02/do-you-believe-familysearch-vision-of.html. Unfortunately, the video is no longer available
10:53:32 From DearMYRTLE  : http://www.delawarecountypa.com/
10:53:34 From Molly McKinley : You also need to check more than one state if the heirs moved. My gggrandfather died in Alabama, his family moved to Arkansas. I found probate files in both states.
10:55:28 From Betty-Lu Burton : I heard they are aiming for next day posting of new digitized records
10:58:28 From Betty-Lu Burton : Meaning that when they get done filming with records currently being digitized around the world.
10:58:42 From Barbara LaMarche to All panelists : When you reach the county will index section of the catalogue, is there a way to know which deeds are digitized from the list ?
10:59:08 From Rachel Evans : The search catalog can also help you find offline records. I found some church records that are only viewable at Salt Lake. The catalog said where the records were located. It is 20 minutes down the road from me. I emailed the Archives and they told me they have more records that were not filmed.
10:59:30 From Doris Haskell to All panelists : Yes! That’s exactly how it worked for me.
11:02:08 From Marcia Philbrick : Some public libraries also provide access to the locked images. I’m 75 miles from a Family History Center and/or a public library with access. I appreciate the library access because it has longer hours.
11:03:37 From Marcia Philbrick : When Kansas records were filmed, the counties decided what would be filmed. Thus, not all county records have been filmed.
11:04:01 From Randi Patrick : For the people who have to travel a long distance, they could ask their local library if they would consider becoming a LDS affiliate.
11:04:08 From Hilary Gadsby : The school admission registers for some of my family are at the museum in the village so will not be digitised.
11:04:19 From Randy Seaver : The San Diego Reginoal FS Library is closed for remodeling for 6 months. They are taking out all of the books and microfilm machines, adding missionary offices and a Discovery Center.
11:04:48 From Barbara Gressel : When I was in Canada last year, I did a lot of research on land records. Some of the records were held in the local history center and they had been filmed my the Family History Center. THe rest of the records are held by Queen’s University and they have not been filmed. Didn’t have time to go to Queen’s . . . so sad. I guess I’ll have to go back.
11:04:51 From Cathy Naborowski : The Minnesota Genealogical Society just became an FHL Affiliate. Took about a month. Cannot see everything but most things.
11:05:32 From June Butka : Not all affiliates have the same available image as the Family History Library.
11:07:02 From Gloria Deison : yes, my church isn’t going to let them digitise. I’m there at the archive all the time, I know we have copies on CDs, but they won’t go on-line. Probably ever.
11:08:14 From Michelle Minner : I found the same thing (list of all the ships and ranks) my father had in the US Navy….the seaman logs are available form the FHL! You do have to read through them (not indexed) but I learned my father was washed off board during the Battle of Leyte in WWII…(we didn’t know about that!)
11:09:00 From Randy Seaver : John is describing genea-gasms in the dusty stacks!
11:09:21 From Marian Koalski : Yes, Randy!
11:11:20 From Marian Koalski : Michelle Minner, do you mean that the seaman logs are online at FamilySearch, or just at the FHL itself?
11:11:56 From Michelle Minner : Family Search Centers…I found the logs from WWII at the Family Center here in Tucson!
11:16:56 From Pat Kuhn : find my past and the Catholic records!!!!!!
11:17:03 From Marian Koalski : Lots of Penna & NJ church records (old and not-so-old) are in Historical Society of Penna’s collection offered on Ancestry.
11:17:49 From Marian Koalski : Gloria Deison, do you mean your local congregation or the whole denomination?

American Ancestors
11:17:56 From Cousin Russ : https://www.americanancestors.org/index.aspx

findmypast 2017

11:18:03 From Cousin Russ : https://www.findmypast.com/
11:18:41 From Gloria Deison : Those CDs were done by local researchers who donated their time so that we could have a backup, I feel the higher ups in the church are not interested (in archives, in genealogy, in opening their archives to share, but at least they have the actual archive open and I can go for others, too.)

Historical Society of Pennsylvania
11:18:55 From Cousin Russ : Historical Society of Pennsylvania https://hsp.org/
11:20:26 From Michelle Minner : WOW I love that County Map! Wish I had one like that for Missouri!
11:21:03 From Randy Seaver : We really need ALL of the record providers to keep adding record collections – competition is necessary to keep growing the opportunities. If only one organization was digitizing, we wouldn’t get new collections as fast as we are now.

11:21:09 From Cousin Russ : Did you know that the Society and the University of Wisconsin (UW) System cooperate in a network of Area Research Centers (ARCs) located at UW campus libraries throughout the state and at the Northern Great Lakes Visitor Center? Each Area Research Center serves a specific geographic region and you can access most collections from across the state and have them sent to your region from anywhere in the network. https://www.wisconsinhistory.org/Records/Article/CS4000

11:21:41 From Cousin Russ : The Legal Genealogist Blog https://www.legalgenealogist.com/2018/08/11/perfect-information/
11:23:50 From John Laws : Hi Debbie good to have you join us
11:24:59 From Betty-Lu Burton : A compilation is a good starting point, but is just a starting point.
11:25:23 From Devon Lee : I’m of the opinion all genealogy research should be peer reviewed. So I would vet the books if it was a project I was interested in.
11:27:53 From June Butka : One of the points Judy Russell, made was that the entries into the Bible were well before the date of the Bible. Bible Date is a important, not only for the births but the person who was supposed to own the Bible.
11:29:17 From Barbara LaMarche : Yes, Dear Myrtle, My looming question. What if you can”t find a document other a authored work?
11:30:03 From Randy Seaver : Barbara, I source the authored work and continue to look for a record.
11:30:05 From John Laws : I put on my blog every day the following statement “The content provided on this site is not guaranteed to be error free It is always advised that you consult original records.”
11:32:18 From Randi Patrick : I have gone to many garage and book sales and I see old bibles on sale. So I wouldn’t count the dates of birth, etc., that are listed as any type of proof; the information could’ve been listed way after. It’s chain of custody should be taken into consideration.
11:32:19 From June Butka : I’m not faulting Judy Either.She followed GPS. [The Genealogical Proof Standard is most recently codified by the Board for Certification of Genealogists in their book Genealogy Standards, fiftieth-anniversary edition (Nashville, TN: Ancestry, 2014).
11:32:21 From Marian Koalski : Isn’t that what the source fields are for when we fill in blanks in genealogy programs?
11:34:36 From Devon Lee : Source fields are great, but it’s great to go further, just like you said.
11:34:43 From Randy Seaver : Some genealogy programs have fields for comments or research notes.


DearMYRTLE's Profile Pic
Myrt’s Musings

For future reference, this is the link to DearMYRTLE’s Event Calendar –http://dearmyrtle.com/blog2/index.php/calendar

Here’s the link to the GeneaWebinars Blog & Calendar of other genealogy webinars, chats and hangouts – http://blog.geneawebinars.com/p/calendar.html

ARCHIVED
Most DearMYRTLE Webinars are embedded in a Myrt’s Musings blog post, along with selected comments and links we mention.

COMMENT AFTER the webinar at http://bit.ly/DearMYRTLEonGoogle


 

ARCHIVED: CanadaGen Study Group 2

CanadaGEN Study Group

Today’s session is all about ship’s passenger records and how to find them, including a two-step process at one site to get from the index to the image itself. Kudos to our guest expert Kathryn Lake Hogan, UE for making this research doable. Be sure to follow her YouTube channel and blog as she continues to share her knowledge.

See also: CanadaGen Study Group 1

Our shared CanadaGen Google Sheet with links we mention is located here:
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/16ZyuWf6hudXmNPCi_QXEKZOorj3kmexZXy_2wm9KJis/edit#gid=1406097859

EMBEDDED VIDEO

SELECTED COMMENTS

10:01:03 From Jan Murphy : Good morning Myrt, Russ & Kathryn!
10:01:18 From Yvonne Demoskoff : Good morning from B.C.!
10:01:55 From Louise Henson to All panelists : Good afternoon from Deep River, Ontario, Canada
10:02:39 From Barbara Gressel : Greetings from Missouri, Barbara Gressel U.E.
10:03:08 From Carol Kuse to All panelists : Good morning from Kansas, Carol Kuse
10:03:59 From Jan Murphy to All panelists : Wikipedia says “Newfoundland joined Canada on March 31, 1949.”
10:04:14 From Cousin Russ to All panelists : https://www.therooms.ca/

TheRooms Screen Shot
10:06:46 From Danine Cozzens : Yes to all links, please! That Google doc had so much good info.
10:06:51 From Hilary Gadsby : Thanks Russ
10:07:13 From Cousin Russ : https://www.therooms.ca/collections-research/genealogy-research
10:08:54 From Cousin Russ : The Ships List http://www.theshipslist.com
10:10:23 From Jan Murphy : US Border Crossings are not that much sooner.
10:11:30 From Hilary Gadsby : I am coming at this from the opposite direction to most as trying to find out where they went when they disappeared from the UK. Have a few that went to Canada.
10:12:33 From Jan Murphy : I’m trying to connect the two ends — I know the US and England bits but Canada is in the middle somewhere (1845ish).
10:13:40 From Jan Murphy : Was Pier 21 opened after the Halifax Explosion?
10:13:56 From Cousin Russ : Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 https://pier21.ca/home
10:13:57 From Yvonne Demoskoff : Kathryn, did you say when those records begin?
10:13:58 From Meg McLaughlin : the arrival port also depends on the time of year that they arrived as St Lawrence froze. My grandfather came in to St John even though he was going to Sasketchewan because he came in March.
10:15:47 From Hilary Gadsby : My ancestors worked in the merchant marine so appeared on the lists as crew members.
library and archives Canada
10:18:38 From Cousin Russ : Library and Archives Canada http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca
10:20:40 From Cousin Russ : Immigrants before 1865 – http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/immigration/immigration-records/immigrants-before-1865/Pages/introduction.aspx

findmypast 2017

10:21:04 From Cousin Russ : Find My Past: Canada, Immigrants to Canada, 1750-1854 https://search.findmypast.co.uk/search-world-Records/canada-immigrants-to-canada-index-1750-1854
10:21:30 From robert e scales : The Nanaimo ( Vancouver Island ) Genealogy group have done indexing: http://nanaimofamilyhistory.ca/passenger-list-project/

10:22:41 From Cousin Russ : Canada, Immigrants To Canada Index, 1750-1854 https://search.findmypast.com/search-world-Records/canada-immigrants-to-canada-index-1750-1854
10:24:02 From Jan Murphy : Ugh there’s no archive reference.
10:28:27 From Carol Kuse : I am trying to find out when and how my Joyal came to the US from Canada.

canGenealogy
10:28:50 From Cousin Russ : CanGenealogy http://www.cangenealogy.com
10:29:14 From Robbin Smith : ty russ
10:30:35 From Cousin Russ : FamilySearch https://www.familysearch.org
Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21
10:32:05 From Cousin Russ : https://pier21.ca/research/immigration-history
10:36:43 From Jan Murphy : What happens when you put the arrival date in the Any field?
10:42:51 From Launa Droescher : Great Great Grandparents show up in 1851 Paris, Onterio Census. Would they be in any boarder crossing records. Think they left from New York, USA.

familysearch_largeSquare10:43:44 From Cousin Russ : Canada passenger lists, 1881-1922 https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/1823240 Digital images of originals housed at the National Archives of Canada (formerly Public Archives of Canada), Ottawa, Ontario. Index and images of ships’ passenger lists (also known as ships’ manifests or seaport records of entry). Contains records for the ports of Quebec City, 1900-1921; Halifax, 1881-1922; Saint John, 1900-1912; North Sydney, 1906-1912; Vancouver, 1905-1912; Victoria, 1905-1912; New York, 1906-1912; and Eastern US Ports, 1905-1912. The lists for United States ports include only those names of passengers with intentions of proceeding directly to Canada.

10:53:43 From Barbara Gressel : That is how I find names in the Land Petitions on the LAC site. It is time consuming but rewarding.
10:55:15 From Jan Murphy : The lists were made in the ticket offices.
10:55:27 From Jan Murphy : Same for the US lists.
10:57:14 From Jan Murphy : Do the lists say who bought the ticket during this period? Sometimes the tickets are bought by other people than the passengers.
10:58:56 From DearMYRTLE to All panelists : I see your comment indicaiton russ. but we are running short on time today.
10:59:06 From DearMYRTLE to All panelists : thank-you for being diligent. 🙂
10:59:27 From DearMYRTLE to All panelists : are you teaching today Russ?
10:59:46 From Cousin Russ : yes, but we are ok
11:00:09 From DearMYRTLE to All panelists : thank you.
11:02:03 From Cheryl Woodward : What if our ancestors are some of the earliest settlers to Canada (1600s)? Are there any records for those ships from Europe?
11:02:34 From Leah Smith : Wow! Great presentation!
11:03:27 From Hilary Gadsby : Just found another record for someone who emigrated a WW1 CEF personnel file

11:05:34 From Cousin Russ : Follow Kathryn’s YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/LOOK4ANCESTORS/featured
11:05:42 From Meg McLaughlin : Scottish clearances was a push factor
11:05:56 From Barbara Gressel : A lot of the Scotsmen left Scotland due to the end of the Clan system. They left for a better life and opportunities.
11:07:07 From Kevin Hackett : In Paul Milner’s seminar at the NGS conference, he said there was a clearing of the Parishes of people they were supporting to Canada
11:08:34 From Danine Cozzens : Thanks for the great background info — my Canadians are there briefly from 1820-1849 but now I have some idea where to look.
11:08:42 From Jan Murphy : Thanks Russ, Myrt and Kathryn!
11:08:47 From Louise Henson to All panelists : Thank yoy very imformative
11:09:13 From Irene Sheridan : That was great. Thank you.
11:10:00 From Sheila Massi : Thank you


DearMYRTLE's Profile Pic
Myrt’s Musings

For future reference, this is the link to DearMYRTLE’s Event Calendar – http://hangouts.dearmyrtle.com/calendar.html

Here’s the link to the GeneaWebinars Blog & Calendar of other genealogy webinars, chats and hangouts – http://blog.geneawebinars.com/p/calendar.html

ARCHIVED
Most DearMYRTLE Webinars are embedded in a Myrt’s Musings blog post, along with selected comments and links we mention at

COMMENT AFTER the webinar at http://bit.ly/DearMYRTLEonGoogle


 

 

FindMyPast: British military, Scotland marriages & newspaper additions

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: The following arrived over the weekend from our friends at FindMyPast.

findmypast 2017

There are more than 849,000 new records and newspaper articles available to search this Findmypast Friday, including;

Britain, Royal Navy, Navy Lists 1827-1945

Search for your ancestor in official lists of Royal Navy Officers. The collection consists of 147 publications spanning the 1824 to 1945. The collection consists of digital images of original lists presented in PDF format.

The amount of information available will vary from volume to volume. Some details you may be able to discover include an individual’s name, rank, seniority, and place of service.

British Army Service Records

Over 34,000 new Scots Guards records have been added to our collection of British Army Service records. The new additions consist of Enlistment Registers spanning the years 1642 to 1939.

The records include bot transcripts and images of the original documents. The Register cover both officers and other ranks and will reveal the place, date, and age of the soldier at the time of attestation. You may also find the soldier’s birth place, spouse’s name, marriage date, and trade prior to joining the army. The books also recorded if the individual received medals or was wounded during service, as well as the individual’s rank at the time of discharge.

Scotland, Edinburgh Marriages 1595-1800

Did any of your relations marry in Edinburgh, Scotland? Discover their names, occupations, residences, spouses and dates of marriage, former marriages, and more in this collection of records from parish registers collated throughout the city.

The collection consists of over 2,400 PDF images of printed marriage registers.

Scotland, Testaments 1514-1800

Did your ancestors die in Scotland? Discover details of their property, relatives, and more in records of their last will and testaments. The collection contains over 2,800 PDF images of original documents

The detail in these records may vary but most will include a combination of the names of those who died, their marital status, their occupations, the names of close relatives, residences and the date of testament.

Scotland, Edinburgh Apprentices 1583-1700

Did any of your ancestors learn their trade in Edinburgh? Discover details of their apprenticeships and occupations in this collection of over 30,000 records from the capital of Scotland.

The information contained in these records varies. Records may include the names and occupations of relatives, locations of birth and residence, occupations and trades, details of close relations and notable life events.

Extra! Extra! The latest additions to our newspaper collection

This week we have added 114,026 new pages to The Archive. We have updated three of our Irish titles, and there are also updates to titles covering the city of Liverpool, the county of Gloucestershire and one of our Scottish titles.

This week’s new additions include;

Irish Independent 1989-1990, 1993-1994
Peeblesshire Advertiser 1880-1882, 1887-1892
Cirencester Times and Cotswold Advertiser 1869
Evening Herald (Dublin) 1986-1987, 1990
Music Hall and Theatre Review 1890
Belfast Telegraph 1913-1914, 1920
Liverpool Echo 1984, 1986

PARTNERSHIP: FindMyPast & LivingDNA

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: The following was received from our friends at FindMyPast and Living DNA.

  • The two leading British companies are creating a new DNA experience focused on uncovering British & Irish roots
  • New service will be launched in Fall 2018
  • Living DNA tests now available at Findmypast  

Thursday July 19th: Leading British and Irish family history website, Findmypast, has today announced a new partnership with the providers of the world’s most advanced DNA test, Living DNA.

Together, the two British companies are creating a new DNA experience that is designed to help customers explore their British and Irish roots. This new experience will combine cutting-edge science with traditional family history research methods, allowing families to discover more about their past and present.

Living DNA’s tests provide a unique breakdown of ethnic identities associated with 21 regions across Britain and Ireland by analyzing unique combinations of linked DNA. This proprietary method delivers a level of detail that is currently unmatched by any other test available on the market.

By combining technology from the leading British DNA company with deep expertise and Findmypast’s vast collection of more 9 billion historical records and newspaper articles, family historian’s will be able to make new discoveries about their British & Irish genetic history.

Living DNA testing kits are now available to purchase at findmypast.com/ancestry-dna-testing/  and new, co-branded kits will be launched when the integrated Findmypast and Living DNA service is introduced later in the year.

“Our partnership with Findmypast continues Living DNA’s mission to make DNA testing simple. We are passionate at not only providing cutting edge ways of looking at your DNA but to do so with strict privacy measures by  never selling your data. This partnership allows the most precise DNA test on the market to work together with Findmypast’s family history records in a way not done before” says Living DNA Co-Founder, David Nicholson.

Tamsin Todd, CEO of Findmypast, said: “As the world leader for British and Irish records, we work hard every day to help our customers feel the thrill of making discoveries about their families. I’m delighted that we are partnering with a British company, Living DNA, who are pioneers in DNA technology, and look forward to combining our expertise in DNA technology and historical records to help people around the world connect with their British and Irish roots.”

For more information, please visit https://www.findmypast.co.uk/ancestry-dna-testing/

About Findmypast

Findmypast (previously DC Thomson Family History) is the British-owned world leader in online family history with over 18 million registered users across its family of brands, which include Findmypast, Genes Reunited, the British Newspaper Archive and Twile.

Its lead brand, also called Findmypast, is the home of the world’s most comprehensive online collection of British and Irish records, including:

  • The largest online collection of UK parish records
  • Twice the number of Irish records available on any other site
  • The British Library’s vast collection of historical newspapers
  • The exclusive Catholic Heritage Archive, a groundbreaking initiative that aims to digitize the historical records of the Catholic Church in North America, Britain and Ireland for the very first time.

Findmypast is committed to making discoveries in the British Isles easier than ever before. It combines the best of British and Irish data with the knowledge of inhouse experts to provide a unique family history experience that guides researchers through every step of their journey.

For more information on how Findmypast is enhancing the experiences of family historians worldwide, visit: www.findmypast.co.uk

About Living DNA

Living DNA is a collaboration of over 100 world-leading scientists, academic researchers and genetic experts from across the globe with the purpose of bringing cutting edge DNA technology to the world.

The team is led by DNA Worldwide Group, a leading DNA testing firm. The company is run by David Nicholson and Hannah Morden who saw an opportunity to show humanity that we are all made up of all of us, dissolving the concept of race. It was launched in 2016 after two years of intensive development but its parent company DNA Worldwide Group has been operating since 2004.

Living DNA is the only test to show a breakdown of  ancestry in percentages from 80 worldwide regions including 21 regions within the UK as well as China, Italy and indigenous Americans from four regions each. Living DNA is also the first to allow users to view their ‘ancestry family’ at different points in history. In so doing, people can see at what point in the past they were connected to their friends and family through their DNA, and discover how ultimately, we are “all made up of all of us.” With a strong focus on privacy and security the company never sells your data and you remain in charge of all your personal and genetic information at all times.