ARCHIVED: Mondays with Myrt – 13 Aug 2018

MondaysWithMyrt

We first tackle the proposed cut that would close the Allen County Public Library. I followed up with the post “Contact Info: Ft. Wayne City Council About Library Budget Cut.” Other topics include:

  • Letters from the Dead –  the latest Jefferson Tate genealogy mystery book by Steve Robinson (Ol’ Myrt received hers as she was typing this post. YAY!)
  • More to the Fudge family photos story
  • Randy’s family photos – let’s remember to take them. (Ol’ Myrt had a big family gathering yesterday and totally forgot to take a single shot.) 
  • Ireland Valuation Books Translator
  • Accessing digital land records at FamilySearch that are not indexed with Randy Seaver’s best advice.
  • Wisconsin Area Research Centers
  • Authored works
  • Family bibles

EMBEDDED VIDEO

SELECTED COMMENTS

10:01:14 From John Laws : Good to be with you guys from a wet Scotland
10:01:17 From Barbara LaMarche to All panelists : Good Morning to all from HOT California.
10:01:48 From Graham Walter : Overcast but dry down near London
10:01:58 From Cousin Russ : From Dick Eastman’s blog “A Fort Wayne, Indiana, City Councilman Proposes Eliminating the Annual Budget for the Allen County Public Library” https://blog.eogn.com/2018/08/13/a-fort-wayne-indiana-city-councilman-proposes-eliminating-the-annual-budget-for-the-allen-county-public-library/amp/
10:02:11 From Marian Koalski : Whoa!
10:02:38 From Marian Koalski : I agree, Russ. Ask the downtown hotels and restaurants.
10:03:15 From Betty-Lu Burton : Does he not realize how many dollars they receive in people visiting the library? I am sure it is more then the annual budget
10:03:28 From Deb Andrew : They tried to do that here, did it for awhile, closed several branches. Then they had to reopen them all over again and buy new books.

FGS logo
10:03:31 From Cousin Russ : Federation of Genealogy Societies https://www.fgsconference.org
10:03:44 From Marian Koalski : The councilman is obviously not in touch with how much internet access the library provides to the public, including e-book borrowings.
10:03:53 From Abbie McDonough : My local library is not just used for reading. For example I go to craft meetings at my local library.
10:04:26 From Barbara LaMarche : Indiana has always been one of the most “Genea” friendly states.
10:04:40 From Marcia Philbrick : There are other public libraries encountering this exact same issue — do away with the annual budget. Even though these aren’t major genealogical libraries, they still likely have resources that genealogists rely on.
10:06:35 From Marian Koalski : Around here, the library is where we meet for book groups, kids’ classes in STEM, computer clubs, genealogy clubs, art displays, musical performances….
10:06:42 From Betty-Lu Burton : My local library provides many activities for children to help with learning and social skills
10:07:28 From Bill West : We had a similiar situation here. Someone wanted to reduce the library budget because “nobody reads anymore” The budget was kept the same and the town has built a new library,
10:08:29 From Marian Koalski : Who is the councilman’s opponent in the upcoming elections?
10:08:32 From Gloria Deison : My local library holds the historical town archive! (morning / evening all!)
10:08:51 From bobbi to All panelists : maybe this was good timing. they can make their presence known.
10:09:09 From Valerie Lisk to All panelists : MAAGI meets at Allen County annually. [Midwest African American Genealogy Institute]
10:09:55 From Yvonne Demoskoff : As an example, when my husband and I were in SLC this February for RootsTech, we spent money locally at restaurants, the mall, souvenirs, and at the planetarium
10:10:11 From Rachel Evans : They don’t understand people are on fixed incomes and can’t afford to buy books on Amazon. My mother is and she is at the library several times a week to get books.
10:10:12 From Hilary Gadsby : Too many small libraries get closed. We will end up with no place to find the recrds if this was to happen.
10:10:55 From Marian Koalski : I suppose that libraries could be viewed as subversive if politicians are afraid of having citizens talk to each other.
10:11:02 From Betty-Lu Burton : The best way is to show them that the library is more than just a book depository and can provide customers to local businesses
10:11:07 From Hilary Gadsby : Our libraries hold a lot more than books.
10:11:24 From Michelle Minner : Unfortunately I don’t think that people that live outside of the local area would have any “say” or vote in the issue. It has to be a community effort…and it has to be a grass roots activism (in my opinion)
10:13:37 From Marian Koalski : Dollars from outside of Allen County could be a form of activism.
10:14:00 From Bill West : One likes to think logic would prevailabout the library, but given recent history I am aconcerned.
10:14:44 From Melissa Barker : I am here listening in but have a cold, home from work.
10:15:07 From Marian Koalski : Remember gifts to local libraries when you write obituaries.
10:15:08 From Betty-Lu Burton : Melissa get better soon.

LettersFromTheDead
10:16:30 From Dave Robison : Letters from the Dead –  the latest Jefferson Tate genealogy mystery book by Steve Robinson

10:18:02 From Hilary Gadsby : More to the story of the bag full of Fudge family photos https://lynnswaffles.com/2018/08/09/fudge-park-and-ginn-family-part-2/

10:20:40 From Randy Seaver : Randy’s FB – https://www.facebook.com/Geneaholic

Ireland Valuation Books Translator

10:21:01 From Cousin Russ : Ireland Valuation Books Translator http://www.townlandvaluationtranslator.com

10:31:03 From Marian Koalski : We need someone who is the Professional Photo Reminder in the family, who will interrupt when needed to get it done.

10:32:03 From Cousin Russ : Land records –  “Finding David Auble’s Land Records in Sussex County, New Jersey” by Randy Seaver https://www.geneamusings.com/2018/08/finding-david-aubles-land-records-in.html
10:33:12 From Doris Haskell  : I have found great treasures in land records. Surprises. Been thinking about getting back into them again.
10:33:27 From Michelle Minner : Thank you, Randy! woo hoo! I am going to search the catalog for land records for my family! WOW
10:34:50 From Betty-Lu Burton : I found my 2 great grandfather’s estate packet recently on FamilySearch. Unfortunately the estate records only mentioned his second family and nothing about his first family. I come through the oldest daughter of the first family. Granted by the time he died all his children from the first family had married and had children of their own.
10:36:47 From John Laws : From an Will for my grandfather published in South Africa as he was the director in the London Office of Stutterfords of Jo’Burg I found two cousins unknown to me – EXCITED.
10:37:02 From Doris Haskell : Do you know if any land records have been indexed?
10:37:31 From Betty-Lu Burton : It is easier and faster to digitize a microfilm than to index it.
10:37:43 From June Butka : I found the index for Elijah Pease Probate docket 1 page 1210, unfortunately I can’t find the docket 1 record
10:39:57 From June Butka : Sometimes they fill in the pages at the end of a year with previous information from early times. Not always just the years listed.
10:41:58 From John Laws : Randy – You put me to shame
10:44:10 From Marcia Philbrick : Deeds are the one source that has helped me separate two men of the same name! I’m very thankful that the images are coming online.
10:44:13 From Doris Haskell to All panelists : Absolutely!
10:44:55 From Doris Haskell : It was the grantee index that led me to the second married name of my female ancestor.
10:48:27 From Randy Seaver : Jay Verkler is who I was thinking about
10:48:44 From Betty-Lu Burton : Both WW I and WW II had 3 different draft cards.
10:49:57 From Hilary Gadsby : I found someone on CEF record at Ancestry and it has numerous pages
10:50:57 From Cousin Russ : Carol – please post your question here
10:52:53 From Marian Koalski : Judging by the excitement, Randy, I think your campaign for studying the browsable records on FamilySearch is succeeding … and needs to continue.
10:53:19 From Randy Seaver : Here is a link to Jay Verkler’s visionary keynote talk at RootsTech 2012 about FamilySearch viasion for the genea-future – https://www.geneamusings.com/2012/02/do-you-believe-familysearch-vision-of.html. Unfortunately, the video is no longer available
10:53:32 From DearMYRTLE  : http://www.delawarecountypa.com/
10:53:34 From Molly McKinley : You also need to check more than one state if the heirs moved. My gggrandfather died in Alabama, his family moved to Arkansas. I found probate files in both states.
10:55:28 From Betty-Lu Burton : I heard they are aiming for next day posting of new digitized records
10:58:28 From Betty-Lu Burton : Meaning that when they get done filming with records currently being digitized around the world.
10:58:42 From Barbara LaMarche to All panelists : When you reach the county will index section of the catalogue, is there a way to know which deeds are digitized from the list ?
10:59:08 From Rachel Evans : The search catalog can also help you find offline records. I found some church records that are only viewable at Salt Lake. The catalog said where the records were located. It is 20 minutes down the road from me. I emailed the Archives and they told me they have more records that were not filmed.
10:59:30 From Doris Haskell to All panelists : Yes! That’s exactly how it worked for me.
11:02:08 From Marcia Philbrick : Some public libraries also provide access to the locked images. I’m 75 miles from a Family History Center and/or a public library with access. I appreciate the library access because it has longer hours.
11:03:37 From Marcia Philbrick : When Kansas records were filmed, the counties decided what would be filmed. Thus, not all county records have been filmed.
11:04:01 From Randi Patrick : For the people who have to travel a long distance, they could ask their local library if they would consider becoming a LDS affiliate.
11:04:08 From Hilary Gadsby : The school admission registers for some of my family are at the museum in the village so will not be digitised.
11:04:19 From Randy Seaver : The San Diego Reginoal FS Library is closed for remodeling for 6 months. They are taking out all of the books and microfilm machines, adding missionary offices and a Discovery Center.
11:04:48 From Barbara Gressel : When I was in Canada last year, I did a lot of research on land records. Some of the records were held in the local history center and they had been filmed my the Family History Center. THe rest of the records are held by Queen’s University and they have not been filmed. Didn’t have time to go to Queen’s . . . so sad. I guess I’ll have to go back.
11:04:51 From Cathy Naborowski : The Minnesota Genealogical Society just became an FHL Affiliate. Took about a month. Cannot see everything but most things.
11:05:32 From June Butka : Not all affiliates have the same available image as the Family History Library.
11:07:02 From Gloria Deison : yes, my church isn’t going to let them digitise. I’m there at the archive all the time, I know we have copies on CDs, but they won’t go on-line. Probably ever.
11:08:14 From Michelle Minner : I found the same thing (list of all the ships and ranks) my father had in the US Navy….the seaman logs are available form the FHL! You do have to read through them (not indexed) but I learned my father was washed off board during the Battle of Leyte in WWII…(we didn’t know about that!)
11:09:00 From Randy Seaver : John is describing genea-gasms in the dusty stacks!
11:09:21 From Marian Koalski : Yes, Randy!
11:11:20 From Marian Koalski : Michelle Minner, do you mean that the seaman logs are online at FamilySearch, or just at the FHL itself?
11:11:56 From Michelle Minner : Family Search Centers…I found the logs from WWII at the Family Center here in Tucson!
11:16:56 From Pat Kuhn : find my past and the Catholic records!!!!!!
11:17:03 From Marian Koalski : Lots of Penna & NJ church records (old and not-so-old) are in Historical Society of Penna’s collection offered on Ancestry.
11:17:49 From Marian Koalski : Gloria Deison, do you mean your local congregation or the whole denomination?

American Ancestors
11:17:56 From Cousin Russ : https://www.americanancestors.org/index.aspx

findmypast 2017

11:18:03 From Cousin Russ : https://www.findmypast.com/
11:18:41 From Gloria Deison : Those CDs were done by local researchers who donated their time so that we could have a backup, I feel the higher ups in the church are not interested (in archives, in genealogy, in opening their archives to share, but at least they have the actual archive open and I can go for others, too.)

Historical Society of Pennsylvania
11:18:55 From Cousin Russ : Historical Society of Pennsylvania https://hsp.org/
11:20:26 From Michelle Minner : WOW I love that County Map! Wish I had one like that for Missouri!
11:21:03 From Randy Seaver : We really need ALL of the record providers to keep adding record collections – competition is necessary to keep growing the opportunities. If only one organization was digitizing, we wouldn’t get new collections as fast as we are now.

11:21:09 From Cousin Russ : Did you know that the Society and the University of Wisconsin (UW) System cooperate in a network of Area Research Centers (ARCs) located at UW campus libraries throughout the state and at the Northern Great Lakes Visitor Center? Each Area Research Center serves a specific geographic region and you can access most collections from across the state and have them sent to your region from anywhere in the network. https://www.wisconsinhistory.org/Records/Article/CS4000

11:21:41 From Cousin Russ : The Legal Genealogist Blog https://www.legalgenealogist.com/2018/08/11/perfect-information/
11:23:50 From John Laws : Hi Debbie good to have you join us
11:24:59 From Betty-Lu Burton : A compilation is a good starting point, but is just a starting point.
11:25:23 From Devon Lee : I’m of the opinion all genealogy research should be peer reviewed. So I would vet the books if it was a project I was interested in.
11:27:53 From June Butka : One of the points Judy Russell, made was that the entries into the Bible were well before the date of the Bible. Bible Date is a important, not only for the births but the person who was supposed to own the Bible.
11:29:17 From Barbara LaMarche : Yes, Dear Myrtle, My looming question. What if you can”t find a document other a authored work?
11:30:03 From Randy Seaver : Barbara, I source the authored work and continue to look for a record.
11:30:05 From John Laws : I put on my blog every day the following statement “The content provided on this site is not guaranteed to be error free It is always advised that you consult original records.”
11:32:18 From Randi Patrick : I have gone to many garage and book sales and I see old bibles on sale. So I wouldn’t count the dates of birth, etc., that are listed as any type of proof; the information could’ve been listed way after. It’s chain of custody should be taken into consideration.
11:32:19 From June Butka : I’m not faulting Judy Either.She followed GPS. [The Genealogical Proof Standard is most recently codified by the Board for Certification of Genealogists in their book Genealogy Standards, fiftieth-anniversary edition (Nashville, TN: Ancestry, 2014).
11:32:21 From Marian Koalski : Isn’t that what the source fields are for when we fill in blanks in genealogy programs?
11:34:36 From Devon Lee : Source fields are great, but it’s great to go further, just like you said.
11:34:43 From Randy Seaver : Some genealogy programs have fields for comments or research notes.


DearMYRTLE's Profile Pic
Myrt’s Musings

For future reference, this is the link to DearMYRTLE’s Event Calendar – http://hangouts.dearmyrtle.com/calendar.html

Here’s the link to the GeneaWebinars Blog & Calendar of other genealogy webinars, chats and hangouts – http://blog.geneawebinars.com/p/calendar.html

ARCHIVED
Most DearMYRTLE Webinars are embedded in a Myrt’s Musings blog post, along with selected comments and links we mention.

COMMENT AFTER the webinar at http://bit.ly/DearMYRTLEonGoogle


 

ARCHIVED: CanadaGen Study Group 2

CanadaGEN Study Group

Today’s session is all about ship’s passenger records and how to find them, including a two-step process at one site to get from the index to the image itself. Kudos to our guest expert Kathryn Lake Hogan, UE for making this research doable. Be sure to follow her YouTube channel and blog as she continues to share her knowledge.

See also: CanadaGen Study Group 1

Our shared CanadaGen Google Sheet with links we mention is located here:
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/16ZyuWf6hudXmNPCi_QXEKZOorj3kmexZXy_2wm9KJis/edit#gid=1406097859

EMBEDDED VIDEO

SELECTED COMMENTS

10:01:03 From Jan Murphy : Good morning Myrt, Russ & Kathryn!
10:01:18 From Yvonne Demoskoff : Good morning from B.C.!
10:01:55 From Louise Henson to All panelists : Good afternoon from Deep River, Ontario, Canada
10:02:39 From Barbara Gressel : Greetings from Missouri, Barbara Gressel U.E.
10:03:08 From Carol Kuse to All panelists : Good morning from Kansas, Carol Kuse
10:03:59 From Jan Murphy to All panelists : Wikipedia says “Newfoundland joined Canada on March 31, 1949.”
10:04:14 From Cousin Russ to All panelists : https://www.therooms.ca/

TheRooms Screen Shot
10:06:46 From Danine Cozzens : Yes to all links, please! That Google doc had so much good info.
10:06:51 From Hilary Gadsby : Thanks Russ
10:07:13 From Cousin Russ : https://www.therooms.ca/collections-research/genealogy-research
10:08:54 From Cousin Russ : The Ships List http://www.theshipslist.com
10:10:23 From Jan Murphy : US Border Crossings are not that much sooner.
10:11:30 From Hilary Gadsby : I am coming at this from the opposite direction to most as trying to find out where they went when they disappeared from the UK. Have a few that went to Canada.
10:12:33 From Jan Murphy : I’m trying to connect the two ends — I know the US and England bits but Canada is in the middle somewhere (1845ish).
10:13:40 From Jan Murphy : Was Pier 21 opened after the Halifax Explosion?
10:13:56 From Cousin Russ : Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 https://pier21.ca/home
10:13:57 From Yvonne Demoskoff : Kathryn, did you say when those records begin?
10:13:58 From Meg McLaughlin : the arrival port also depends on the time of year that they arrived as St Lawrence froze. My grandfather came in to St John even though he was going to Sasketchewan because he came in March.
10:15:47 From Hilary Gadsby : My ancestors worked in the merchant marine so appeared on the lists as crew members.
library and archives Canada
10:18:38 From Cousin Russ : Library and Archives Canada http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca
10:20:40 From Cousin Russ : Immigrants before 1865 – http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/immigration/immigration-records/immigrants-before-1865/Pages/introduction.aspx

findmypast 2017

10:21:04 From Cousin Russ : Find My Past: Canada, Immigrants to Canada, 1750-1854 https://search.findmypast.co.uk/search-world-Records/canada-immigrants-to-canada-index-1750-1854
10:21:30 From robert e scales : The Nanaimo ( Vancouver Island ) Genealogy group have done indexing: http://nanaimofamilyhistory.ca/passenger-list-project/

10:22:41 From Cousin Russ : Canada, Immigrants To Canada Index, 1750-1854 https://search.findmypast.com/search-world-Records/canada-immigrants-to-canada-index-1750-1854
10:24:02 From Jan Murphy : Ugh there’s no archive reference.
10:28:27 From Carol Kuse : I am trying to find out when and how my Joyal came to the US from Canada.

canGenealogy
10:28:50 From Cousin Russ : CanGenealogy http://www.cangenealogy.com
10:29:14 From Robbin Smith : ty russ
10:30:35 From Cousin Russ : FamilySearch https://www.familysearch.org
Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21
10:32:05 From Cousin Russ : https://pier21.ca/research/immigration-history
10:36:43 From Jan Murphy : What happens when you put the arrival date in the Any field?
10:42:51 From Launa Droescher : Great Great Grandparents show up in 1851 Paris, Onterio Census. Would they be in any boarder crossing records. Think they left from New York, USA.

familysearch_largeSquare10:43:44 From Cousin Russ : Canada passenger lists, 1881-1922 https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/1823240 Digital images of originals housed at the National Archives of Canada (formerly Public Archives of Canada), Ottawa, Ontario. Index and images of ships’ passenger lists (also known as ships’ manifests or seaport records of entry). Contains records for the ports of Quebec City, 1900-1921; Halifax, 1881-1922; Saint John, 1900-1912; North Sydney, 1906-1912; Vancouver, 1905-1912; Victoria, 1905-1912; New York, 1906-1912; and Eastern US Ports, 1905-1912. The lists for United States ports include only those names of passengers with intentions of proceeding directly to Canada.

10:53:43 From Barbara Gressel : That is how I find names in the Land Petitions on the LAC site. It is time consuming but rewarding.
10:55:15 From Jan Murphy : The lists were made in the ticket offices.
10:55:27 From Jan Murphy : Same for the US lists.
10:57:14 From Jan Murphy : Do the lists say who bought the ticket during this period? Sometimes the tickets are bought by other people than the passengers.
10:58:56 From DearMYRTLE to All panelists : I see your comment indicaiton russ. but we are running short on time today.
10:59:06 From DearMYRTLE to All panelists : thank-you for being diligent. 🙂
10:59:27 From DearMYRTLE to All panelists : are you teaching today Russ?
10:59:46 From Cousin Russ : yes, but we are ok
11:00:09 From DearMYRTLE to All panelists : thank you.
11:02:03 From Cheryl Woodward : What if our ancestors are some of the earliest settlers to Canada (1600s)? Are there any records for those ships from Europe?
11:02:34 From Leah Smith : Wow! Great presentation!
11:03:27 From Hilary Gadsby : Just found another record for someone who emigrated a WW1 CEF personnel file

11:05:34 From Cousin Russ : Follow Kathryn’s YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/LOOK4ANCESTORS/featured
11:05:42 From Meg McLaughlin : Scottish clearances was a push factor
11:05:56 From Barbara Gressel : A lot of the Scotsmen left Scotland due to the end of the Clan system. They left for a better life and opportunities.
11:07:07 From Kevin Hackett : In Paul Milner’s seminar at the NGS conference, he said there was a clearing of the Parishes of people they were supporting to Canada
11:08:34 From Danine Cozzens : Thanks for the great background info — my Canadians are there briefly from 1820-1849 but now I have some idea where to look.
11:08:42 From Jan Murphy : Thanks Russ, Myrt and Kathryn!
11:08:47 From Louise Henson to All panelists : Thank yoy very imformative
11:09:13 From Irene Sheridan : That was great. Thank you.
11:10:00 From Sheila Massi : Thank you


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Myrt’s Musings

For future reference, this is the link to DearMYRTLE’s Event Calendar – http://hangouts.dearmyrtle.com/calendar.html

Here’s the link to the GeneaWebinars Blog & Calendar of other genealogy webinars, chats and hangouts – http://blog.geneawebinars.com/p/calendar.html

ARCHIVED
Most DearMYRTLE Webinars are embedded in a Myrt’s Musings blog post, along with selected comments and links we mention at

COMMENT AFTER the webinar at http://bit.ly/DearMYRTLEonGoogle


 

 

FindMyPast: British military, Scotland marriages & newspaper additions

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: The following arrived over the weekend from our friends at FindMyPast.

findmypast 2017

There are more than 849,000 new records and newspaper articles available to search this Findmypast Friday, including;

Britain, Royal Navy, Navy Lists 1827-1945

Search for your ancestor in official lists of Royal Navy Officers. The collection consists of 147 publications spanning the 1824 to 1945. The collection consists of digital images of original lists presented in PDF format.

The amount of information available will vary from volume to volume. Some details you may be able to discover include an individual’s name, rank, seniority, and place of service.

British Army Service Records

Over 34,000 new Scots Guards records have been added to our collection of British Army Service records. The new additions consist of Enlistment Registers spanning the years 1642 to 1939.

The records include bot transcripts and images of the original documents. The Register cover both officers and other ranks and will reveal the place, date, and age of the soldier at the time of attestation. You may also find the soldier’s birth place, spouse’s name, marriage date, and trade prior to joining the army. The books also recorded if the individual received medals or was wounded during service, as well as the individual’s rank at the time of discharge.

Scotland, Edinburgh Marriages 1595-1800

Did any of your relations marry in Edinburgh, Scotland? Discover their names, occupations, residences, spouses and dates of marriage, former marriages, and more in this collection of records from parish registers collated throughout the city.

The collection consists of over 2,400 PDF images of printed marriage registers.

Scotland, Testaments 1514-1800

Did your ancestors die in Scotland? Discover details of their property, relatives, and more in records of their last will and testaments. The collection contains over 2,800 PDF images of original documents

The detail in these records may vary but most will include a combination of the names of those who died, their marital status, their occupations, the names of close relatives, residences and the date of testament.

Scotland, Edinburgh Apprentices 1583-1700

Did any of your ancestors learn their trade in Edinburgh? Discover details of their apprenticeships and occupations in this collection of over 30,000 records from the capital of Scotland.

The information contained in these records varies. Records may include the names and occupations of relatives, locations of birth and residence, occupations and trades, details of close relations and notable life events.

Extra! Extra! The latest additions to our newspaper collection

This week we have added 114,026 new pages to The Archive. We have updated three of our Irish titles, and there are also updates to titles covering the city of Liverpool, the county of Gloucestershire and one of our Scottish titles.

This week’s new additions include;

Irish Independent 1989-1990, 1993-1994
Peeblesshire Advertiser 1880-1882, 1887-1892
Cirencester Times and Cotswold Advertiser 1869
Evening Herald (Dublin) 1986-1987, 1990
Music Hall and Theatre Review 1890
Belfast Telegraph 1913-1914, 1920
Liverpool Echo 1984, 1986

PARTNERSHIP: FindMyPast & LivingDNA

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: The following was received from our friends at FindMyPast and Living DNA.

  • The two leading British companies are creating a new DNA experience focused on uncovering British & Irish roots
  • New service will be launched in Fall 2018
  • Living DNA tests now available at Findmypast  

Thursday July 19th: Leading British and Irish family history website, Findmypast, has today announced a new partnership with the providers of the world’s most advanced DNA test, Living DNA.

Together, the two British companies are creating a new DNA experience that is designed to help customers explore their British and Irish roots. This new experience will combine cutting-edge science with traditional family history research methods, allowing families to discover more about their past and present.

Living DNA’s tests provide a unique breakdown of ethnic identities associated with 21 regions across Britain and Ireland by analyzing unique combinations of linked DNA. This proprietary method delivers a level of detail that is currently unmatched by any other test available on the market.

By combining technology from the leading British DNA company with deep expertise and Findmypast’s vast collection of more 9 billion historical records and newspaper articles, family historian’s will be able to make new discoveries about their British & Irish genetic history.

Living DNA testing kits are now available to purchase at findmypast.com/ancestry-dna-testing/  and new, co-branded kits will be launched when the integrated Findmypast and Living DNA service is introduced later in the year.

“Our partnership with Findmypast continues Living DNA’s mission to make DNA testing simple. We are passionate at not only providing cutting edge ways of looking at your DNA but to do so with strict privacy measures by  never selling your data. This partnership allows the most precise DNA test on the market to work together with Findmypast’s family history records in a way not done before” says Living DNA Co-Founder, David Nicholson.

Tamsin Todd, CEO of Findmypast, said: “As the world leader for British and Irish records, we work hard every day to help our customers feel the thrill of making discoveries about their families. I’m delighted that we are partnering with a British company, Living DNA, who are pioneers in DNA technology, and look forward to combining our expertise in DNA technology and historical records to help people around the world connect with their British and Irish roots.”

For more information, please visit https://www.findmypast.co.uk/ancestry-dna-testing/

About Findmypast

Findmypast (previously DC Thomson Family History) is the British-owned world leader in online family history with over 18 million registered users across its family of brands, which include Findmypast, Genes Reunited, the British Newspaper Archive and Twile.

Its lead brand, also called Findmypast, is the home of the world’s most comprehensive online collection of British and Irish records, including:

  • The largest online collection of UK parish records
  • Twice the number of Irish records available on any other site
  • The British Library’s vast collection of historical newspapers
  • The exclusive Catholic Heritage Archive, a groundbreaking initiative that aims to digitize the historical records of the Catholic Church in North America, Britain and Ireland for the very first time.

Findmypast is committed to making discoveries in the British Isles easier than ever before. It combines the best of British and Irish data with the knowledge of inhouse experts to provide a unique family history experience that guides researchers through every step of their journey.

For more information on how Findmypast is enhancing the experiences of family historians worldwide, visit: www.findmypast.co.uk

About Living DNA

Living DNA is a collaboration of over 100 world-leading scientists, academic researchers and genetic experts from across the globe with the purpose of bringing cutting edge DNA technology to the world.

The team is led by DNA Worldwide Group, a leading DNA testing firm. The company is run by David Nicholson and Hannah Morden who saw an opportunity to show humanity that we are all made up of all of us, dissolving the concept of race. It was launched in 2016 after two years of intensive development but its parent company DNA Worldwide Group has been operating since 2004.

Living DNA is the only test to show a breakdown of  ancestry in percentages from 80 worldwide regions including 21 regions within the UK as well as China, Italy and indigenous Americans from four regions each. Living DNA is also the first to allow users to view their ‘ancestry family’ at different points in history. In so doing, people can see at what point in the past they were connected to their friends and family through their DNA, and discover how ultimately, we are “all made up of all of us.” With a strong focus on privacy and security the company never sells your data and you remain in charge of all your personal and genetic information at all times.

ARCHIVED: WACKY Wed Mondays with Myrt 20 July 2018

WackyWednesday_MwMEXTENDED

After a break, Mondays with Myrt 18 June 2018 was soooo full of the latest genea-news, that it spilled over into WACKY Wednesday 20 June 2018. Our first segment features Blaine Bettinger discussing his newly unveiled DNA Central located at https://dna-central.com  

We also discuss:

  • Resources for learning how to integrate DNA results into paper-trail research
  • Anti-virus programs
  • NGS free access to most of FindMyPast record sets
  • German research track at #FGS2018
  • Map-based research logs
  • AniMap by Goldbug
  • Elizabeth Shown Mill’s notes
  • British & Irish Military Records Study Group
  • Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy [SLIG] Virtual Nordic
  • Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy [SLIG] Virtual Advanced Evidence Analysis Practicum
  • Reclaim the Records – NYC Marriage Licenses
  • The Legal Genealogist’s What’s a Compilation Copyright?”

 

DNA Central

EMBEDDED WEBINAR

SELECTED COMMENTS
19:02:08 From Cousin Russ : Blaine T. Bettiner’s APG profile page: https://www.apgen.org/directory/search_detail.html?mbr_id=6457
19:02:36 From Cousin Russ : The Genetic Genealogist by Blaine Bettinger https://thegeneticgenealogist.com/
19:03:14 From Dave Robison: I signed up for DNA Central today and I’m anxious to hear more about it!

Genetic Genealogy
19:03:45 From Cousin Russ : Genetic Genealogy in Practice by Blaine T. Bettinger & Debbie Parker Wayne https://www.amazon.com/Genetic-Genealogy-Practice-Blaine-Bettinger/dp/1935815229


19:03:58 From Cousin Russ : The Family Tree Guide to DNA Testing and Genetic Genealogy by Blaine T. Bettinger https://www.amazon.com/Family-Guide-Testing-Genetic-Genealogy/dp/1440345325

19:04:54 From Cousin Russ : Blaine Bettinger’s Genetic Genealogy Tips & Techniques Facebook Group
 https://www.facebook.com/groups/geneticgenealogytipsandtechniques/
19:05:09 From Cousin Russ : Open Q&A” with Blaine Bettinger on DearMYRTLE’s YouTube Channel 

19:14:26 From LisaGorrell : Just signed up. Really excited to explore the site.
19:14:28 From Dave Robison : Blaine, you were the subject of a conversation yesterday at the Cape Cod Genealogical Society’s annual meeting. I only wish I knew about DNA-Central!!
19:14:49 From nana2 : What are the best web browsers to use to access DNA-Central? [We’ve tested the site using Chrome, Safari and Firefox.]
19:16:34 From Karen Trearchis : Congratulations Blaine Bettinger!
19:17:05 From Mary Roddy : OK, I signed up!

19:18:10 From Mary Roddy : Are you planning on anything regarding writing about using DNA? How it fits into the GPS, what we need to document?

DearMYRTLE suggests:

for members over at Family Tree Webinars.

19:18:31 From Nadine : Do you or will you cover how to organize this data from all of the matches? I am feeling overwhelmed and need tips on this.
19:19:06 From LisaGorrell : How do we put the data into a proof argument?
19:19:37 From Cousin Russ : Membership in DNA Central is $99/year or $9.99/month. Both membership levels give you all the benefits of DNA Central. To join during this beta launch, GGTT [Genetic Genealogy Tips & Techniques] members can use this link or the coupon code “GGTT” to get $10 off a yearly membership! https://www.facebook.com/groups/geneticgenealogytipsandtechniques/
19:19:39 From Dave Robison : I need all of these resources….I’m beginning to get many responses from my paternal side where I’ve asked everyone to test and compare notes.
19:20:17 From Melissa : I am excited to share this new site with my genealogy class on Tuesday!
19:22:10 From Karen Trearchis : I already began the Myheritage course.

Regarding SPAM EMAIL
19:26:54 From jacquelinewilson : I also put mine in spam and send an email to the person and say that they may have been hacked.
19:26:56 From Karen Trearchis : In a Mac you drag into Junk mail and then go to junk folder and then click a dropdown menu that says erase junk mail.
19:27:37 From Louis : I use Windows Defender which is free and comes with Windows 10 and I’ve never had a virus.
19:28:45 From Karen Trearchis : For my Mac, I use Malwarebytes Anti Malware. You use this when you think you have a problem or want to see if you do have a problem. However, always is ok.
19:29:45 From Karen Trearchis : I will check .
19:30:06 From jacquelinewilson : I am on a MAC and use Avast.
19:30:10 From Louis : Yes, it’s me, Louis Kessler.
19:30:13 From nana2 : For my HP laptop, I use McAfee, which came with it.
19:30:29 From Karen Trearchis : Yes, https://www.malwarebytes.com
19:31:18 From Karen Trearchis : It used to be free and the address was .org
19:31:57 From nana2 : I have two email addresses. One is with Wyoming.com and the other is Gmail. They both have the option to send things to Junk.
19:32:06 From Karen Trearchis : The Mac technicians use Malwarebytes, too.
19:32:23 From Karen Trearchis : At apple.com
19:33:13 From Cousin Russ : https://www.mcafee.com
19:33:19 From Cousin Russ : https://www.avast.com

19:33:49 From nana2 : I just want to say that I’m so happy we are all back together tonight. 🙂
19:34:25 From Jeanne Mower : you mentioned all are the same, but can you talk about fake ones
19:35:02 From nana2 : With GEDmatch, you can make an exclusive email address for people to contact you for chatting about your matches.
19:35:24 From jacquelinewilson : My question is do you need both a virus protection and malware protection?
19:35:54 From Karen Trearchis : For Mac people google David A. Cox, he owns his own business at the Cape, he suggested this product. He hasfree youtube classes on Macs.
19:37:12 From Karen Trearchis : Macs has a firewall, too.
19:37:44 From Dustin  The NGS [National Genealogical Society] Quarterly is worth the membership alone! http://www.ngsgenealogy.org
19:38:33 From Cousin Russ : REGISTER TODAY – S.L.I.G. *VIRTUAL* . Nordic . Advanced Evidence Analysis Practicum (Both AM & PM sessions filled the first day!) More info at http://www.slig.ugagenealogy.org #SLIGVirtual #SLIG
19:38:54 From Mary Roddy : NGS also offers a FREE subscription to FindMYPast. It is not the full subscription, but is has a lot of material. Here’s the link. https://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/findmypast
19:40:58 From Cousin Russ : ‪German track at FGS http://voice.fgs.org/2018/06/german-research-track-at-fgs-2018.html #genealogy‬
19:42:54 From Dustin : I have done full track’s for one day of conference. I did a whole day of BCG courses.
19:43:00 From Cousin Russ : Reclaim the Records: Index to New York City Marriage Licenses, 1996-2017 https://www.reclaimtherecords.org/records-request/11/
19:43:03 From Mary Roddy to All panelists : YES! They have done so much good stuff. NY Death indexes from late 1800s thru mid-1900s I think
19:44:32 From Cousin Russ : Map Based Research Log http://genealogytipoftheday.com/index.php/2018/06/03/a-map-based-research-log
19:44:59 From Dustin to All panelists : I keep maps for all the areas I need to research for my next Kentucky research trip
19:45:54 From jacquelinewilson : I am creating such a map for my current research in Missouri. Multiple boundary changes during the time period I am researching.
19:46:05 From Mary Roddy: I use this site all the time to see county maps for each state. It really helps to understand the geography. https://geology.com/county-map/nebraska.shtml
19:46:49 From Deb : In northwest Alabama you have to know when Marion, Winton, Lawrence, and Franklin redivided. Haleyville is in Winston and Marion counties.
19:49:47 From Deb: AniMaps is cool, it shows the counties by the date.

AniMap
19:50:45 From Deb : You can also pin towns and cemeteries in AniMaps.
19:51:53 From Cousin Russ : AniMap https://goldbug.com/animap/

rumsey maps

19:53:16 From Cousin Russ : David Rumsey Maps https://www.davidrumsey.com
19:53:21 From Marilyn Martinson to All panelists : how about England?
19:53:35 From Deb : In Illinois, Williamson counties came out of Franklin county. Denver county in Colorado came out of Arapahoe county.
19:55:12 From Cousin Russ : Maps at Tennessee State Library and Archives https://sos.tn.gov/tsla/maps
19:55:15 From Deb : Find My Past has some really great maps for England, very detailed. They also have an education course.
19:56:54 From Cousin Russ : Using Maps in Genealogical Research by Sara A. Scribner, CG – BCG Webinar at FamilyTreeWebinars https://familytreewebinars.com/download.php?webinar_id=770 She does a “Problem Solving” segment at 21m 37s into the webinar.
19:58:35 From Cousin Russ : British & Irish Military Records Study Group — https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1XdZ1ryLBGdsQaTiWPNr38fS0NxuTmjCLFjDoi9v1HLc/edit#gid=54768883

19:59:07 From Cousin Russ : ESM’s 54 page report on this project is found here: Elizabeth Shown Mills,“Samuel Witter (1787–1876) & Wife Rachel “Lizzie” Smith (ca. 1802–1854: Research Notes,” A Working File Updated 5 December 2013; archived online at E. S. Mills, Historic Pathways (www.HistoricPathways.com : 20 June 2018).

19:59:53 From Cousin Russ : ESM’s talk was reviewed by Yvette Hoitink, CG on the BCG website here: https://bcgcertification.org/skillbuilding-ngs-2018-9/

20:02:31 From Cousin Russ : 2018 NGS Conference Playback (video & audio) 2018 Samuel Witter vs. Samuel Witter: Separating Same-Name Soldiers, War of 1812 by Elizabeth Shown Mills “Presenter(s): Elizabeth Shown Mills CG, CGL, FASG, FNGS, FUGA Session#: 7780-F311 Session Length: 60 Minutes Program: NGS 2018 Family History Conference Date: May 4, 2018 $14 for http://www.playbackngs.com/7780-f311
20:02:41 From jacquelinewilson : I was able to hear that talk via live stream!
20:03:39 From DearMYRTLE to All panelists : https://www.historicpathways.com/download/samuelwitterrachelsmith.pdf
20:03:48 From Cousin Russ : https://www.historicpathways.com/download/samuelwitterrachelsmith.pdf
20:04:23 From jacquelinewilson : That is true will all of her talks! I have been lucky to see her several times in the past!!!!!

20:05:15 From Cousin Russ : What’s a COMPILATION COPYRIGHT? Judy G. Russell explains it succinctly. https://www.legalgenealogist.com/2018/06/12/about-that-copyright-notice


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For future reference, this is the link to DearMYRTLE’s Event Calendar – http://hangouts.dearmyrtle.com/calendar.html

Here’s the link to the GeneaWebinars Blog & Calendar of other genealogy webinars, chats and hangouts – http://blog.geneawebinars.com/p/calendar.html

ARCHIVED
Most DearMYRTLE Webinars are embedded in a Myrt’s Musings blog post, along with selected comments and links we mention at

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