ARCHIVED: Mondays with Myrt – 1 July 2019

MondaysWithMyrt

We explain that one may not install software on Chromebooks, as they require cloud-based productivity software (like Google Docs & Google Sheets) and all data is stored in the cloud as well. Liv Christensen takes us on a retreat to the Norwegian cabin her grandmother visited every summer for 70 years.

EMBEDDED VIDEO

SELECTED TEXT & LINKS WE MENTION

09:41:10 From Betty-Lu Burton : I have been seeing some new features of Family Tree Maker. Maybe Cousin Russ can talk about that today. Also I am thinking of getting a Chromebook when I replace my laptop. What are the options for a program.
09:42:46 From Betty-Lu Burton : I was wondering if the tree vault would be usable for a Chromebook
09:43:04 From Betty-Lu Burton : ok thank you
09:44:36 From Pat Kuhn : A great new genealogical mystery book: https://www.amazon.com/Digging-History-Museum-Mystery-Book-ebook/dp/B07T85Q684/ref=sr_1_3

09:54:28 From Danine Cozzens : My husband says we will have what the boys in the back room are having!
09:56:26 From June Butka : Happy Canada Day.
09:56:37 From Melissa Barker to All panelists : I am at work, just going to listen in.
09:57:28 From Sheila Benedict : Hi from Santa Barbara County CA
09:57:49 From Hilary Gadsby : The Connect-a-thon is not until July 12 so highlight it next week
09:58:20 From Hilary Gadsby to All panelists : https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Help:Connect-a-Thon

RootsTech Generic09:58:52 From Graham Walter to All panelists :  Find out about RootsTech 2019 in London
https://www.rootstech.org/london and at https://www.rootstech.org/speakers

RT London 2019 Line Up –
https://www.rootstech.org/blog/x-factor-uk-stars-join-rootstech-london-line-up

09:59:38 From john laws : Hi from Bonnie scotland we have returned from San Francisco & Reno NV good to be back walking Captain on the beach.

10:01:09 From Hilary Gadsby  : Nick Barratt is a great speaker I heard him in April
10:01:43 From Melissa Barker : Hello Everyone! The Archive Lady is listening in, working in the archives today!
10:02:37 From June Butka : Healing energy, Pat.
10:02:37 From Janet Iles : Greetings from Canada on Canada Day.
10:04:05 From William West to All panelists : Goooooooood morning from sunny Plymouth County, Massachusetts
10:05:19 From Sheryl Whisenhunt : It just proves you cannot hide from us.
10:05:19 From June Butka : Thank you all for the prayers you sent my friends son who went through Emergency Jaw surgery. He is home and doing well.

MyHeritageLIVE2019Amsterdam10:06:43 From Cousin Russ : The shortest possible URL when sharing a link from certain email “campaigns” such as:

https://blog.myheritage.com/2019/06/myheritage-live-2019s-schedule-genealogy-dna-and-so-much-more/?utm_campaign=MyHeritage%20LIVE%202019&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=73925627&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-8B473itlyrTMYepd_RkBm391bCem-SGx5UOPYq9YbVp6pU6tbyOzyJ7-m9va18VedeF8hUisSKRJ2iI385sGdrGXe2qg&_hsmi=73925627

Can also be reached by shortening the URL to:

https://blog.myheritage.com/2019/06/myheritage-live-2019s-schedule-genealogy-dna-and-so-much-more

NOTE: Everything from the ? to the end can be deleted.

10:09:20 From Laurie Desmarais to All panelists : hello!!! from my cube
10:09:49 From June Butka : Great tip for smaller URL’s
10:09:51 From Sheila Benedict : It works
10:10:38 From Graham Walter to All panelists : By Pat
10:17:57 From Linda Theaker to All panelists : What are the ladders by the windows for ?
10:18:12 From Sheila Benedict : I live in a Danish community and all their last names end in “sen.” Is that true in Norway?
10:19:30 From Linda Jordan to All panelists : Not an Airedale
10:19:42 From Shelby Bender to All panelists : The dog is not an Airedale, maybe a Brittany Spaniel.
10:19:50 From Betty-Lu Burton : Where does Haugen come from? Is that a farm name? My 2-great grandmother had Haugen in her name
10:20:14 From Linda Jordan to All panelists : England has hanging baskets all over too.
10:20:44 From Randy Seaver : we have only the baskets, someone neglected to water the flowers this spring.
10:21:23 From Betty-Lu Burton : Sheila Norwegian names will have son at the end or will be what is called a farm name which does not have the son at the end
10:23:52 From Sheila Benedict : Thank you. Liv’s surname ends in sen which is why I am curious.
10:25:06 From Danine Cozzens : Sofa looks like our Regency-Federal of early 1800s — love the costumes!
10:27:00 From Randy Seaver : My experience is that Norway records use both -sen and -son. Norway became independent from Denmark in about 1814 (?) and was also influenced by Sweden -son.
10:27:32 From Betty-Lu Burton : Thank you Randy my family used the son
10:28:22 From Linda Theaker to All panelists : Thank you for sharing !!
10:30:24 From Randy Seaver : I really enjoyed going to the living history farm at Molster above Voss in Norway. It was set as in 1855 when Linda’s Liland family left Molster for america.
10:32:49 From Graham Walter to All panelists : . The Genealogy Squad
https://www.facebook.com/groups/genealogysquad/
10:33:36 From Danine Cozzens : The Huntington Library in San Marino CA has an entire building for American history, including some amazing new colonial (US) artifacts, from ironwork tools to painted boxes and itinerant paintings. Highly recommended.
10:34:24 From Graham Walter to All panelists : Farm Name discussion
 https://www.facebook.com/groups/genealogysquad/permalink/2368835993360286/
10:34:42 From Randy Seaver : Linda’s “Leland” name came from “Liland” farm in Voss in Hordaland. But her ancestors never lived on Liland farm. An uncle married a Liland farm girl, came to America, and they all adopted Leland in the 1870s. They were Sjursen in the 1860s and early 1870s with the patronymics.
10:35:29 From June Butka : A lot of AKA’s in that line.
10:36:03 From Randy Seaver : For pre-1870s, I use the patronymic name and add the farm names as Alternate Names
10:37:00 From Sheila Benedict : Your explanation is why I give clients a specialized researcher in Scandinavian names. As I was the archivist at a Spanish mission, I had to learn the two surnames system in the files there.
10:37:07 From Betty-Lu Burton : It took me a while to understand that idea of farm names and how they change
10:37:47 From Sheryl Whisenhunt : Liv, did every farm have a name, or just some of the farms?
10:38:26 From Sheryl Whisenhunt : Thank you, Liv.
10:39:32 From Randy Seaver : Liv, how do you pronounce “Sjur” ? It’s a common first name in my wife’s ancestry.
10:39:39 From Betty-Lu Burton : My understanding the farms in Norway are like villages in that there are several families that work the farm at different times
10:40:43 From Deb Andrew : I love the mystery and detective novels from Norway.
10:40:49 From Sheryl Whisenhunt : So the r is pronounced as a T?
10:42:07 From Randy Seaver : Sheryl, it sounds like a New England r sound to me
10:43:13 From Sheryl Whisenhunt : Randy, I go through this with my Danish relatives. I annihilate/Americanize the language and I get laughed at.
10:43:17 From Betty-Lu Burton : In the South that are just small communities that are just a geographical location. Maybe at some point it was a small town but not any more
10:44:51 From Danine Cozzens : Reno is underestimated— this is on the charming waterfront walk. Lively arts scene.
10:46:12 From Randy Seaver : Hey, it hailed in Guadalajara over the weekend – a couple of feet in the photo I saw.
10:46:55 From Linda Jordan to All panelists : Saw the hail aftermath on TV — it was amazing!
10:47:12 From Graham Walter to All panelists : Hail in mexico 1.5metres…. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-48821306

10:49:18 From Randy Seaver:  Amanuensis Monday posts – I’m approaching 500 posts now of transcriptions. I’m curating them in https://www.geneamusings.com/p/amanuensis-monday-posts.html

10:49:30 From Sheila Benedict : Roots Tech London – I would love to go. Maybe next year. Renting a house in Dublin for a month pretty much decimated my travel budget for 2019.
10:50:00 From Cousin Russ : https://conferencekeeper.org/
10:50:02 From Cousin Russ : .
10:51:02 From Linda Theaker to All panelists : Will people at home be able to watch some of the speakers like we did for Rootstech U.S. [NOTE: RootsTech has not announced a live streaming schedule for RT London.]
10:51:36 From Graham Walter to All panelists : Drew Smith will be speaking as well
10:53:24 From Sheila Benedict : Will it be in London in 2020 or back to SLC? [NOTE: There will be SLC in 2020.]
10:53:30 From Linda Theaker to All panelists : Thank you.
10:55:41 From LivChristensen : In Norway one will find the name “Haugen” often. ” “Haug” can be translated to mound or hill. The first owner of the family running the farm I am on now is Kristoffer Ellingsen Haugen. The ending “en” is the same as the.
10:56:31 From Betty-Lu Burton : Thank you Liv that will help with keeping confusion down as I work on that line
10:56:50 From William West to All panelists : I still feel guilty about not having gotten to that second one.
10:57:09 From Betty-Lu Burton : I will treat Haugen more like a farm name than a surname
11:00:12 From William West : It sometimes takes me more than hour for a page, depending on how messy the writing is.
11:02:50 From William West : I LOVE probate records!!

11:05:00 From Cousin Russ : https://www.americanancestors.org
11:06:10 From Deborah Glover : thx SO much
11:06:21 From DearMYRTLE : Cloud-based genealogy software ROOTSFINDER
https://www.rootsfinder.com/
11:08:38 From Betty-Lu Burton : Many times Ancestry has sent me to FamilySearch to look at the image
11:09:08 From Linda Theaker to All panelists : I have an appointment and have to leave… Thanks for sharing everything.. I will look for the recording….

Abe Lincoln

IMAGE: This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons.

11:09:18 From Randy Seaver : Just like information on the Internet, Abraham Lincoln said that “all genealogy records are on Ancestry.com”

11:09:38 From Deborah Glover : Ancestry trees … so so many mistakes in trees. Ancestry always crashing, major errors.
11:09:44 From Graham Walter to All panelists : also depends on what you are researching at a particular time as to which subs site is the better at this point
11:10:15 From Betty-Lu Burton : I have seen that quote also Randy. It makes you realize how not everything is true and you need to find it out yourself
11:10:16 From Randy Seaver : So if RootsFinder is now owned by Findmypast, does FMP have plans for RootsFinder as their “big” tree? Or personal trees?
11:10:25 From Kathleen Daetsch to All panelists : I have always had a software program on my computer with my data base on it I use two now I have Brothers Keeper and Rootsmagic
11:11:03 From Dave Robison : Randy, Lincoln also stated “If it’s on the internet, it’s true!”
11:11:09 From Shelby Bender to All panelists : Enjoyed the live visit to the museum – what a great treat today.

11:12:02 From Cousin Russ : https://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk/
11:12:14 From Betty-Lu Burton : I have heard people that will make a list of what they want to look at on the various websites and then when the list gets long enough they will get a months subscription and find all the records on their list
11:13:29 From Randy Seaver : I use Ancestry, FamilySearch, MyHeritage, Findmypast and American Ancestors every day. I’d be lost without them since I can’t travel much any more.
11:14:17 From Randy Seaver : I have a yearly US subscription to Ancestry – $189, less than 55 cents a day! I use it almost every day, often for hours.
11:14:41 From Graham Walter to All panelists : .Site contents Scots People – https://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk/what-records-are-in-the-site

also for Scotlands People – Records Guides A-Z
https://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk/guides/record-guides-alphabetical
11:15:12 From Linda Jordan to All panelists : Scotlands People is the best site for Scottish ancestors. Almost anything I have looked for I’ve found there. The only thing that I don’t like is that it helps the more you know so you don’t pay for a lot of records that aren’t yours.
11:15:54 From Sheila Benedict : Is Scotlands People free or paid? [NOTE: Pay to view. You can see the results list, but to see the actual document, you purchase credits and then spend them as needed.]
11:16:02 From Linda Jordan to All panelists : Libraries are the best for accessing databases — and most can be accessed from home with a library card.
11:16:09 From Marcia Philbrick to All panelists : State of Kansas provides access to Newspapers.com and Ancestry. A Kansas driver’s license is required.
11:16:13 From Graham Walter to All panelists : Scotland People is a paid site but you pay by view
11:16:19 From Betty-Lu Burton : Anyone heard of Notion https://www.notion.so/product it came up in my facebook newsfeed and it looks interesting. It says it is a possible replacement for Evernote
11:16:36 From Dave Robison : Nearly all libraries here in Western Mass carry Ancestry Library. In our clinics, I show people how they can email found documents directly to themselves without printing.
11:17:04 From Marcia Philbrick to All panelists : Our local library digitized the local papers as did a neighboring library (Seneca, Kansas and Sabetha, KS) Links to the digitized copies are on their websites.
11:17:40 From Dave Robison : I’ll be explaining all that at
11:17:47 From Dave Robison : OSG next year!
11:17:53 From Sheila Benedict : Yes Dave, here in my area, the genie societies, if you are a member, can access a lot of them. However, I have to pay for many of them.
11:17:59 From Dave Robison : OGS…..
11:18:17 From Betty-Lu Burton : Many libraries will also have subscriptions to Find My Past and My Heritage
11:19:05 From Deborah Glover : fabulous webinar I found this LAST night on FB via Twitter which I am a newbie @. Wow so grateful to all the folks here. Again fabulous. I do have a question. The SAR and DAR applications on record are a LOT of the time blank and unproven. These are not confirmed that I can tell … so is there a Dominion Genealogist that reviewed/reviews these? How does this work now and historically?
11:20:30 From Deb Andrew : Ancestry is doing it now. It was there yesterday and today.
11:20:48 From Dave Robison : Deborah, If the record is at DAR.org, then it has been proven at some point. However, record copies approved prior to 1985 are no longer acceptable and must be re-researched and resubmitted.
11:21:14 From Betty-Lu Burton : I tried it out the hints yesterday
11:21:25 From Dave Robison : Also, the local chapter’s Registrar should be able to help….
11:22:22 From William West : I’ve had that for about a week. I’ve already used the Other box to umm…point out that one hint was for a person who lived 200 years after my ancestor.
11:22:36 From Betty-Lu Burton : I knew about the ignore hints feature but I did not realize it was also for those you accept
11:23:22 From Sheila Benedict : Interesting dialogue but tonight is our APG Virtual Chapter presentation and as president of the chapter, I need to get busy on that. I had hoped there would be more on Scotland today as I am in the middle of Lanarkshire work so thank you for the URL for Scotlandspeople. I will sign up.
11:23:35 From Marcia Philbrick to All panelists : I’m putting in info on hints in hopes that the computers will get more accurate and so that others will avoid adding those inaccurate hints to their trees.
11:23:41 From Deborah Glover : I am also in this database. Have claimed 2. One from Scotland and the other England via Bailey’s Court records to Van Dieman’s Land. http://www.hawkesbury.net.au/claimaconvict/
11:23:45 From Betty-Lu Burton : I get frustrated when the hint is for some one that lived in a different country
11:23:59 From Deborah Glover : FREE
11:24:40 From William West : Sometimes I think Ancestry sort of throws the Hints at the wall and sese what sticks
11:26:37 From Deborah Glover : When I search ALL records on USA I get all ENGLAND records. So frustrating. Ancestry says they are “working on it”.
11:27:02 From Deborah Glover : So this link will help
11:27:04 From Randy Seaver : Another problem is that Ancestry Hints are offered from their Top 10% of collections by record number.
11:27:28 From DearMYRTLE . : Sheila, I’m sorry you were unhappy with the variety of information provided during this morning’s Mondays with Myrt. Check out https://www.familysearch.org/ask/landing?search=scotland&show=lessons&message=true
11:27:54 From Randy Seaver : And you don’t get ALL ancestry Hints for a person immediately – sometimes you have to stimulate Hints by editing a person or clicking on the Family View for a person profile.
11:28:41 From Sheila Benedict : Actually not unhappy, it was interesting to hear about areas I do not do any work in.
11:30:07 From Randy Seaver : You can get all records for your AMT person by searching from the person profile. But you also get lots of other records not for your person. The records for your person will be near the top of the list – in the first 100 matches.
11:30:28 From Danine Cozzens : Great job persisting when foiled by technology today!
11:30:56 From William West : have a great reunion!
11:31:46 From Shelby Bender to All panelists : yes!
11:31:47 From Danine Cozzens : I hear it!
11:31:50 From Cyndy Bray : we hear it too
11:31:51 From Molly McKinley to All panelists : yes
11:31:52 From Sheryl Whisenhunt : Yes, we hear it.
11:31:58 From Kathleen Daetsch to All panelists : yes
11:32:00 From Deb Andrew to All panelists : Yes, even when late.
11:32:01 From William West : I heard it
11:32:05 From Deborah Glover : yes and wonderful info.
11:33:09 From Deborah Glover : thx panel I am a newbie living Ontario, Canada
11:33:36 From Kathleen Daetsch to All panelists : That is great! gives you some independence.
11:33:42 From Randy Seaver : Deborah, where in Ontario? I have ancestry in Norfolk County and Prince Edward County. Loyalists.
11:34:02 From Deborah Glover : researching Hunterdon N.J.
11:34:06 From Danine Cozzens : Facebook post did it for me.
11:34:59 From Deborah Glover : I have TONS of Norfork Co. info if interested
11:35:07 From Danine Cozzens : Thanks again


DearMYRTLE's Profile Pic
Myrt’s Musings

For future reference, this is the link to DearMYRTLE’s Event Calendar –http://dearmyrtle.com/blog2/index.php/calendar

Here’s the link to the GeneaWebinars Blog & Calendar of other genealogy webinars, chats and hangouts – http://blog.geneawebinars.com/p/calendar.html

ARCHIVED
Most DearMYRTLE Webinars are embedded in a Myrt’s Musings blog post, along with selected comments and links we mention.


 

FindMyPast: Scotland, Darien Scheme Investors 1696

Alex Cox visits with DearMYRTLE, explaining that this failed Darien investment scheme lost 1/4 of Scotland’s wealth. “On the 26 June 1695, the Scottish Parliament passed an Act establishing the Company of Scotland Trading to Africa and the Indies, the company was financed entirely by public subscription.

Opposed by commercial interests from England, the company of Scotland raised subscriptions for the scheme in Amsterdam, Hamburg, and London.

English investors soon raised their share but withdrew their money after King William and the English Parliament turned against the venture. However, by August 1696 the Scottish investors raised £400,000 themselves.” Discover more about these records at FindMyPast.

EMBEDDED VIDEO


DearMYRTLE's Profile Pic

Myrt’s Musings

For future reference, this is the link to DearMYRTLE’s Event Calendar –http://dearmyrtle.com/blog2/index.php/calendar

Here’s the link to the GeneaWebinars Blog & Calendar of other genealogy webinars, chats and hangouts – http://blog.geneawebinars.com/p/calendar.html

ARCHIVED
Most DearMYRTLE Webinars are embedded in a Myrt’s Musings blog post, along with selected comments and links we mention.


 

REGISTER NOW: DearMYRTLE October 2018 Events

DearFRIENDS,
Cousin Russ and I have scheduled a very busy schedule in October 2018 — chock full of virtual learning opportunities for online genealogists. We’ve partnered with Family History Expos‘ Holly Hansen to produce a week-long 2018 International Family History Expo virtual conference

2018 PIRATES of the Pedigree

DearMYRTLE sponsored sessions include:

  • 10am Monday  Mondays with Myrt—Women Homesteaders: If he could do it so could I with Jamie Mayhew
  • 7pm Tuesday Genealogy in Ukraine: Discover Online Resources with Michelle Tucker Chubenko
  • 10am Wednesday Scotland Research Strategies with Claire V. Brisson-Banks
  • 7pm Wednesday Digital Library on American Slavery & More with Diane L. Richard
  • 10am Thursday Lost in Australia with Helen V. Smith
  • 7pm Thursday España por favor: Spanish Records and Resources with Debbie Gurtler
  • 10am Friday English Land Records with Sue Adams
  • 7pm Friday It’s All Greek to Me! Genealogy Research in Greece with Carol Kostakos Petranek
  • 10am Saturday Norwegian Research with Liv Birgit Christensen
  • 7pm Saturday Slow Down—Planning Your Research with Fiona Brooker
  • For the full schedule, see https://www.familyhistoryexpos.com/viewevent/index/190/#eg

We’re also planning a Halloween Bash toward the end of the month. Start planning your costume and virtual backdrop now.PromoSHOAa Halloween Spooktacular

Cousin Russ and I present these webinars at no cost to the viewer. If you find the information useful, consider the Pay What You Want business model Ol’ Myrt employs. Post COMMENTS AFTER the hangout, comments continue at http://bit.ly/DearMYRTLEonGoogle


OCTOBER 2018 DearMYRTLE EVENTS


MondaysWithMyrt

1 October 2018 Mondays with Myrt Our flagship webinar, where we talk about anything and everything that’s come across our genea-desks in the last week. The live broadcast starts at Noon Eastern US (New York), 11am Central US (Chicago), 10am Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 9am Pacific US (Los Angeles)


DearMYRTLE's WACKY Wednesday Logo

3 October 2018 WACKY Wednesday with DearMYRTLE’s *very* distant cousin Our topic is determined by our Mondays with Myrt discussions. The live broadcast starts at 9pm Eastern US (New York), 8pm Central US (Chicago), 7pm Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 6pm Pacific US (Los Angeles).


MondaysWithMyrt

8 October 2018 Mondays with Myrt Our flagship webinar, where we talk about anything and everything that’s come across our genea-desks in the last week. The live broadcast starts at Noon Eastern US (New York), 11am Central US (Chicago), 10am Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 9am Pacific US (Los Angeles)


DearMYRTLE's WACKY Wednesday Logo

10 October 2018 WACKY Wednesday with DearMYRTLE’s *very* distant cousin Our topic is determined by our Mondays with Myrt discussions. The live broadcast starts at 9pm Eastern US (New York), 8pm Central US (Chicago), 7pm Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 6pm Pacific US (Los Angeles).


Women Homesteaders

15 October 2018  (Monday) A special presentation for Family History Expo’s Pirates of the Pedigree 2018 International Family History Expos Virtual Event combining:

  • An abbreviated Mondays with Myrt followed by
  • Women Homesteaders: If he could do it so could I with Jamie Lee McManus Mayhew

The Homestead Act of 1862 opened the West to settlement by families, recently freed slaves, single men and single women. These women were uniquely qualified, bringing their special skills to help shape the future of the western US. This presentation will teach you about the laws and processes governing homesteading through the eyes of some of the women who braved the loneliness and hardships of open land. Learn where to find the records and how to use them to expand your research.

Jamie Lee McManus Mayhew is a family history researcher and speaker. She has a Professional Learning Certificate in Genealogical Studies from the National Institute for Genealogical Studies. She specializes in U.S. research and speaks on all areas of land research.


 

ukraine

16 Oct 2018 (Tuesday) Genealogy in Ukraine: Discover Online Resources with Michelle Tucker Chubenko. The live broadcast starts at 9pm Eastern US (New York), 8pm Central US (Chicago), 7pm Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 6pm Pacific US (Los Angeles).

Whether your roots are in Galicia, Volhynia, Inter-War Poland or today’s Ukraine, Michelle will share her “top-ten” websites for research. From online indexes to digitized images of records, you’ll learn about who is bringing greater access to the records from the Central State Historical Archives (TsDIAK & TsDIAL), Oblast (Regional) Archives, Archiwum Główne Akt Dawnych (AGAD) and other historical organizations in the diaspora. Discover how to use message boards and other databases to find fellow researchers and historical information on Ukraine’s rich, yet turbulent history.

Michelle Tucker Chubenko is a professional genealogist and researcher with Legacy Tree Genealogists. She specializes in New Jersey and Eastern European research and is a founding member with the Nashi Predky Family History Group at the Ukrainian History and Education Center.

Registration: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_rS-zdIAgT-myTLCCKy0jAA


AmericaGen Study Group

NEW time just this session. 17 October 2018 (Wednesday) AmericaGen Study Group tackles Chapter 11 “Family History – Going Beyond Genealogy” from Val Greenwood’s The Researchers Guide to American Genealogy, 2017 (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company.) The live broadcast starts at 2pm Eastern US (New York), 1pm Central US (Chicago), noon Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 11am Pacific US (Los Angeles). If you are new, register here:

https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_m-BvT1rGQGWI6RMyC2YRKw


 

Scotland

17 Oct 2018 (Wednesday) Scotland Research Strategies with Claire V. Brisson-Banks. The live broadcast starts at Noon Eastern US (New York), 11am Central US (Chicago), 10am Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 9am Pacific US (Los Angeles). The live broadcast starts at Noon Eastern US (New York), 11am Central US (Chicago), 10am Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 9am Pacific US (Los Angeles).

Case Study: Using a set of records, in a step by step process, to unravel a family legend and extend a family pedigree. Using ScotlandsPeople.gov.uk, FamilySearch.org, Scan and other Scottish websites.An accredited genealogist who owns Timeless Genealogies, a research firm. A BYU-Idaho Family History Professor, an international presenter who mentors future genealogists. Provides technical support for Ancestral Quest. An independent associate for Legal Shield and ID Shield to aid those who need Identity Theft protection and Access to Lawyers.

Registration: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_fDadAQVFTNmbgcDC6j_Gug


American Slavery

17 Oct 2018 (Wednesday) Digital Library on American Slavery & More with Diane L. Richard. The live broadcast starts at 9pm Eastern US (New York), 8pm Central US (Chicago), 7pm Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 6pm Pacific US (Los Angeles).

The Digital Library on American Slavery (DLAS) is several projects complemented by other online resources focusing on slave petitions & narratives, bills of sale, runaway advertisements, etc. Some collections and techniques which will be focused on include … • DLAS [slave petitions, runaway slave advertisements, bills of sale, transatlantic slave trade database] & related projects with complementary content [including local efforts such as Duplin County (NC) Register of Deeds, Unknown No Longer [VA], other runaway slave advertisement sites, etc] • Slave Narratives [not all are part of the Born in Slavery: Slave Narratives from the Federal Writers’ Project, 1936 to 1938 [Library of Congress] • Using Archivegrid to search for private manuscript collections containing slave records.

Genealogy researcher since 1987; professional since 2004. Focus on the South, African-American, and lineage research using unique online and on-the-ground research resources. Researched for and appeared on Who Do You Think You Are? Regular contributor to “Internet Genealogy” and “Your Genealogy Today.” Presents at national conferences and edits two journals.

Registration: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_C5jy4I7cTOqtnWyEV2wF-g


Australia

18 Oct 2018 (Thursday) Lost in Australia with Helen V. Smith.  The pre-recorded broadcast starts at Noon Eastern US (New York), 11am Central US (Chicago), 10am Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 9am Pacific US (Los Angeles). The live broadcast starts at Noon Eastern US (New York), 11am Central US (Chicago), 10am Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 9am Pacific US (Los Angeles).

While initially a destination for the convicts of the UK, it was also a destination for the riches within from whaling, land and then the gold rushes of the 1850s, which attracted people from all over the world. Researching in Australia is a matter of knowing the time and place. From the time of white settlement in 1788 to Federation in 1901, Australia was comprised of a number of colonies. They were self-governed and responsible for their own immigration, defence, civil registration etc. There are many resources (online and off, free and Pay sites) that will find that ancestor lost in Australia.Researching since 1986, Helen is the author of Death Certificates and Archaic Medical Terms and Google, the Genealogist’s Friend, plus articles for family history and scientific publications. Helen has presented in the U.S., Canada, England, and New Zealand, and on 12 “Unlock the Past” cruises. Member of APG and GSG.

Watch via WebinarJam at: https://www.familyhistoryexpos.com/viewevent/index/190


Spain

18 Oct 2018 (Thursday) España por favor: Spanish Records and Resources with Debbie Gurtler. The live broadcast starts at 9pm Eastern US (New York), 8pm Central US (Chicago), 7pm Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 6pm Pacific US (Los Angeles).

Are you trying to trace ancestors in Spain? This class will teach you how to find records, both online and in the archives of Spain. You’ll come away with an understanding of the various record types and what clues they might hold. Sound research methodology will be discussed as will aids to help you read the Spanish handwritten records once you’ve found them.

Debbie works at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City. In addition to helping guests with ancestors from Spain, Latin America, Italy and Portugal, she is the manager of the Simplified Learning team. She graduated with a BA in Family History from Brigham Young University. She is fluent in Spanish, having lived in South America for over five years. She regularly presents classes in English and Spanish and is an Accredited Genealogist® for Spain and the US, Mid-South region.

Registration: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_vSs6OYy1Sh67Ctho-B0RMw


England19 Oct 2018 (Friday) English Land Records with Sue Adams. The live broadcast starts at Noon Eastern US (New York), 11am Central US (Chicago), 10am Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 9am Pacific US (Los Angeles). The live broadcast starts at Noon Eastern US (New York), 11am Central US (Chicago), 10am Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 9am Pacific US (Los Angeles).

This advanced class explores English land records, an under-used source type. A minority of people owned real property in England, but for those who did, property records are potentially a very rich source of information. This class explains types of tenure (ownership), the processes for transfer or inheritance of property, and the documents produced. Unfamiliar legal terms like freehold and copyhold will be de-mystified. Focus will be on documents in English after 1733. Students will learn strategies for finding, interpreting and incorporating property records in their research.Sue Adams is a professional genealogist based in Norfolk, England. Having earned an undergraduate degree in Family and Community History in 2001, and a Masters degree in Genealogical, Palaeographic and Heraldic Studies from the University of Strathclyde in 2012, Sue’s research interests include English land records, migration, digital technologies, and genealogical data standards.

Registration: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_gSOHOTSHQeWpySvcyNr0iQ


Greece
19 Oct 2018 (Friday) It’s All Greek to Me! Genealogy Research in Greece with Carol Kostakos Petranek. The live broadcast starts at 9pm Eastern US (New York), 8pm Central US (Chicago), 7pm Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 6pm Pacific US (Los Angeles).

In the early 1900’s, thousands of men left Greece to find work and provide a better life for their families. Today, many thousands of their descendants are seeking their roots. Family history research in Greece is challenging yet achievable. This presentation will describe the records available in civil archives, municipal town halls, libraries and churches. It will also provide an introduction to documents available online through the website of the General Archives of Greece. A detailed handout for this session will be provided, and supplementary materials will include: how to read various record sets, word lists, and links to online sources. At the conclusion of this presentation, a beginning researcher will have a comprehensive overview of the resources and record sets to begin research in Greece.

Assistant Director of the Washington, D.C., Family History Center, Carol is an active member of the Greek genealogy community, writes a blog (SpartanRoots.wordpress.com), contributes to Greek online associations and research websites, and volunteers at the National Archives in Washington where she serves as a Genealogy Aid in the Research Room.

Registration: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_lixNswdsSTWCYSGDeJwZLQ


Norwegian

20 October 2018 (Saturday) Norwegian Research with Liv Birgit Christensen. The live broadcast starts at Noon Eastern US (New York), 11am Central US (Chicago), 10am Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 9am Pacific US (Los Angeles). The live broadcast starts at Noon Eastern US (New York), 11am Central US (Chicago), 10am Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 9am Pacific US (Los Angeles).

Having a starting point in the USA with a few facts about the Norwegian ancestor(s) makes it possible to find them in Norway by using FamilySearch, the Digital Archives and the Norwegian Historical Data Centre (censuses) separately and in combination. The Church books at the Digital Archives are the main sources of information about Norwegians and can be read both transcribed and in scanned versions. Many more sources can be found there, than the usual vital records, vaccination to mention one. These sources are all accessible for free. We will show you how to use technology in translating different kinds of text and how to write all the letters in the Norwegian alphabet, which has 29 letters. We will talk about Norwegian naming patterns and we will show how to optimize searching to find what you need more easily.

Liv is a lecturer in both her home country of Norway and the U.S. and a member of APG, she is a popular webinar speaker for international audiences. Liv specializes in her grandparents’ home counties, establishing provenance of family heirlooms, identifying persons and places in photographs, and discovering DNA proof of lineage.

Registration: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_YsnDg1iQRTGB634oYnDMmg


slow down

20 October 2018 (Saturday) Slow Down – Planning Your Research with Fiona Brooker. The live broadcast starts at 9pm Eastern US (New York), 8pm Central US (Chicago), 7pm Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 6pm Pacific US (Los Angeles).

It’s so exciting! You’ve just received a new certificate and have new family names. There’s so much new research to do and before you know it, it’s 2am and somehow you missed dinner. Finding new family can be exciting, but sometimes it pays to slow down and plan your research.

As an addicted family historian for over 30 years, Fiona is now breaking through brick walls with DNA and making connections with new family members. As a professional genealogist (Memories in Time) She’s helping others get started; get through road blocks; find family; get organised and find heirs to estates.

Registration: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_Jd8CWpS-Q06fyl6tewHM6A


MondaysWithMyrt

22 October 2018 Mondays with Myrt Our flagship webinar, where we talk about anything and everything that’s come across our genea-desks in the last week. The live broadcast starts at Noon Eastern US (New York), 11am Central US (Chicago), 10am Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 9am Pacific US (Los Angeles)


24 Oct 2018 (Wednesday) The Archive Lady  The live broadcast starts at 9pm Eastern US (New York), 8pm Central US (Chicago), 7pm Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 6pm Pacific US (Los Angeles).


PromoSHOAa Halloween Spooktacular29 October 2018 Mondays with Myrt  Halloween Spooktacular. Prizes for the best costumes. MwM is our flagship webinar, where we talk about anything and everything that’s come across our genea-desks in the last week. The live broadcast starts at Noon Eastern US (New York), 11am Central US (Chicago), 10am Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 9am Pacific US (Los Angeles).


AmericaGen Study Group31 October 2018 AmericaGen Study Group tackles Chapter 12 “Compiled Sources and Newspapers” from Val Greenwood’s The Researchers Guide to American Genealogy, 2017 (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company.) The live broadcast starts at Noon Eastern US (New York), 11am Central US (Chicago), 10am Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City), 9am Pacific US (Los Angeles).


DearMYRTLE's Profile Pic
Myrt’s Musings

For future reference, this is the link to DearMYRTLE’s Event Calendar –http://dearmyrtle.com/blog2/index.php/calendar

Here’s the link to the GeneaWebinars Blog & Calendar of other genealogy webinars, chats and hangouts – http://blog.geneawebinars.com/p/calendar.html

Archived webinars with selected comments and links we mentioned are found at  http://dearmyrtle.com/blog2/index.php/blog/


 

FindMyPast: British military, Scotland marriages & newspaper additions

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: The following arrived over the weekend from our friends at FindMyPast.

findmypast 2017

There are more than 849,000 new records and newspaper articles available to search this Findmypast Friday, including;

Britain, Royal Navy, Navy Lists 1827-1945

Search for your ancestor in official lists of Royal Navy Officers. The collection consists of 147 publications spanning the 1824 to 1945. The collection consists of digital images of original lists presented in PDF format.

The amount of information available will vary from volume to volume. Some details you may be able to discover include an individual’s name, rank, seniority, and place of service.

British Army Service Records

Over 34,000 new Scots Guards records have been added to our collection of British Army Service records. The new additions consist of Enlistment Registers spanning the years 1642 to 1939.

The records include bot transcripts and images of the original documents. The Register cover both officers and other ranks and will reveal the place, date, and age of the soldier at the time of attestation. You may also find the soldier’s birth place, spouse’s name, marriage date, and trade prior to joining the army. The books also recorded if the individual received medals or was wounded during service, as well as the individual’s rank at the time of discharge.

Scotland, Edinburgh Marriages 1595-1800

Did any of your relations marry in Edinburgh, Scotland? Discover their names, occupations, residences, spouses and dates of marriage, former marriages, and more in this collection of records from parish registers collated throughout the city.

The collection consists of over 2,400 PDF images of printed marriage registers.

Scotland, Testaments 1514-1800

Did your ancestors die in Scotland? Discover details of their property, relatives, and more in records of their last will and testaments. The collection contains over 2,800 PDF images of original documents

The detail in these records may vary but most will include a combination of the names of those who died, their marital status, their occupations, the names of close relatives, residences and the date of testament.

Scotland, Edinburgh Apprentices 1583-1700

Did any of your ancestors learn their trade in Edinburgh? Discover details of their apprenticeships and occupations in this collection of over 30,000 records from the capital of Scotland.

The information contained in these records varies. Records may include the names and occupations of relatives, locations of birth and residence, occupations and trades, details of close relations and notable life events.

Extra! Extra! The latest additions to our newspaper collection

This week we have added 114,026 new pages to The Archive. We have updated three of our Irish titles, and there are also updates to titles covering the city of Liverpool, the county of Gloucestershire and one of our Scottish titles.

This week’s new additions include;

Irish Independent 1989-1990, 1993-1994
Peeblesshire Advertiser 1880-1882, 1887-1892
Cirencester Times and Cotswold Advertiser 1869
Evening Herald (Dublin) 1986-1987, 1990
Music Hall and Theatre Review 1890
Belfast Telegraph 1913-1914, 1920
Liverpool Echo 1984, 1986

ISBGFH: Mini-Institute Aug 2018, Philadelphia

ISBGFHResearching Family in the British Isles

The Historical Society of Pennsylvania (HSP) has partnered with the International Society for British Genealogy and Family History (ISBGFH) to conduct a four day program of researching family in the British Isles. ISBGFH conducts the British Institute held annually in Salt Lake City to provide week-long education by well-known genealogists on the British Isles. From 13-16 August 2018, the ISBGFH has arranged for several presenters to provide an overview of researching British Isles topics at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. These presentations will explore DNA, Scotland, Ireland and England research. London based genetic genealogist Dr. Maurice Gleeson, MB, will present on DNA and Irish research, Christine Woodcock, from Genealogy Tours of Scotland, will discuss Scottish research, and Frank Southcott, President, ISBGFH, will explore the English records.

The HSP program is designed to be attended either on a given day and topic or in its entirety. It is an in-depth overview of British Isles research and enhances attendance for those who may desire to attend the British Institute where morning instruction and afternoon independent research are conducted in the LDS Family History Library in Salt Lake City on a country topic. More information about the British Institute is available HERE

The HSP curriculum for each day involves 4 presentations of one hour and fifteen minutes each. Monday, 13 August 2018, Dr Gleeson, MB, will explore advances made in DNA and how it can be applied to your British Isles research. Christine Woodcock will discuss the uniqueness of Scottish research on Tuesday, 14 August 2018. Dr. Gleeson will return on Wednesday, 15 August 2018, to present on the ever increasing resources available on Irish research, and Thursday, 16 August 2018, Frank Southcott, will examine English genealogical resources.

The cost of the four day program will be $299. Individual program days are available for $99 per day. Limited consultation slots will be available on DNA, Scotland and Ireland during the program for $125 hour.
Registration:
http://hsp.org/calendar/researching-family-british-isles


DNA Instructor: Dr Maurice GleesonMaurice Gleeson

  • An introduction to DNA testing for Genealogy
    This introductory talk will explain the basics of DNA testing, the three main types of test, how each one can be applied in practice (with examples), and which one is best for you to specifically address your genealogical conundrums.
  • Using Y-DNA to research your surname of choice
    Anyone can research any particular surname (i.e. family name) that they want – you just need to find the right cousin to test. Y-DNA is eminently suited to surname research because it follows the same path as hereditary surnames i.e. back along the father father father line. This talk explores surname DNA studies and what they can reveal about your surname
  • Applying autosomal DNA to your family history research – the theory
    The most popular of the DNA tests is the autosomal test. This can be used to research all of your ancestral lines (as opposed to Y-DNA and mitochondrial DNA which only help you explore a single ancestral line each). This talk explores the basic science behind autosomal DNA testing, the secrets to successfully applying it, and how it can be combined with other tests and genealogy to help answer specific genealogical questions.
  • Applying autosomal DNA to your family history research – the practice
    This is a more in-depth look at the use of autosomal DNA, including a step-by-step approach to tackling your matches, the concept of triangulation, the use of third party tools, and how techniques used to help adoptees trace their birth family can also help us to break thru our genealogical Brick Walls.

Scottish Genealogy Instructor Christine WoodcockChristine Woodcock

  • In Search of Your Scottish Ancestors: Search Your Roots; Discover Your Heritage
    While many people want to know more about their Scottish heritage, they don’t know where to begin. Fortunately, researching our Scottish ancestors is a fairly easy task. Knowing where to look is usually where we get tied up. This presentation will get you started in researching your Scottish ancestry as well as how to make the most of your research. Topics Include: starting your search, reaching out to others, ScotlandsPeople website, Scottish naming patterns, marriages and family history societies.
  • Breaking Through Brick Walls in Scottish Research
    Scottish documents contain a wealth of information and can make researching so much easier when you really take a look at what the documents are telling you. It becomes important to really pay attention to the key words on the documents so that you know what records you need to look at next in order to break through brick walls and learn as much as you can about your Scottish ancestors. In this presentation we will look at the key words on the documents that may help break down the brick wall. Then we will look at where those records exist and how you can access them.
  • Online and Offline Databases for Scottish Genealogy Research
    There comes a time when you have done all of the online researching you can do using the standard databases. In this presentation you will learn of the databases that aren’t as well know but that can assist in breaking through your brick walls. These include: websites for researching Scottish occupations, websites specific to the genealogy of regions where your ancestors might have lived, emigration databases, military databases, witchcraft databases, medieval ancestry, and British newspapers.
  • Military Men, Covenanters and Jacobites: Historic Events That Led to Mass Migration
    This session will help you understand the importance of the events in Scottish history that led to a large number of Scots leaving their homeland for life in the Americas. In order to be successful researching in the Scottish records, we need to know where in Scotland our ancestors originated. Bridging the gap between finding them in the North American records (birth, marriage, death and census records) and being able to locate them in the Scottish records may seem like a daunting task. However, it is often less of a challenge and more of a reward if you understand what brought them here in the first place. Some clues can be taken from the major historic events in Scottish history that led to Scots leaving their homeland.

Irish Research Instructor Dr Maurice Gleeson

Maurice Gleeson

 

  • Tracing Your Ancestors Back to Ireland
    For many Irish-Americans, all they know is their ancestor “came from Ireland” but they have no further information than that. This talk gives an overview of the various techniques & records available in the US (and elsewhere) that can be used to help trace your ancestor back to where they came from in Ireland. These include shipping records, emigration records, but also surname dictionaries and distribution maps.
  • Irish Church and Civil Registration Records
    In the last year or so, many of the civil registration records are coming online. Most of these are now available for free via http://www.irishgenealogy.ie and digital images of the original record can be downloaded. Civil registration started in 1864 for most records. Prior to this, one has to rely on church records for tracing further back and these can be very helpful indeed or not at all – coverage is patchy and most records peter out around 1800-1830. However, all of Ireland is covered by two websites and most of this research can be done from the comfort of your own home.
  • Census, Census Substitutes, and Land Records
    Census records survive for only 1901 and 1911, with some scraps from other years. Griffith’s Valuation can be very helpful as a mid-1800 census substitute but it is the Cancelled or Revised Valuation Books that provide a wealth of information that allow tracing relatives forward and backward from the present day to the 1850s. We will also look at the Tithe Applotment books and the Registry of Deeds.
  • Less Common Irish Genealogical Records
    This talk explores the wealth of genealogical material to be found in newspapers, cemeteries, probate, petty session court records, & dog licenses. We will also explore some of the resources that everyone should be using as a routine part of their ongoing Irish research.

English Research Instructor Frank Southcott
Frank Southcott

  • Researching Your Family in England: Census and National Registration
    A useful England census has been conducted every 10 years since 1841 and is accessible through 1911. It is the primary resource to establish families in England during that period. England also conducted a national registration in 1939 as an ancillary of WWII. Both of these resources will be explored during this session.
  • Researching Your Family in England: Civil Registration
    Civil registration of birth, marriages and deaths commenced on 1 July 1837. Explore the records and idiosyncrasies of the registration process in England and how to obtain the information for your family.
  • Researching Your Family in England: Wills and Church Records
    Wills survive from early times. Baptisms, marriages and burials survive in a great number of parishes from the mid-1500’s. This session will explore the available probate and church records and the wealth of information that can be derived.
  • Researching English Family at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania
    Many people are surprised at the vast collection of British Isles records available at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania library. Explore the records and resources available for British Isles family research at HSP with Daniel Rolph, PhD, Historian and Head of Reference Services.

Registration:
http://hsp.org/calendar/researching-family-british-isle