Announcing GenDoc Study Group Panelists

GenDocStudyGroup_Logo

The following brave souls have volunteered to be panel participants for the upcoming GenDoc Study Group. Each will take Dr. Thomas W. Jones’ newest book, Mastering Genealogical Documentation, chapter by chapter and post examples from their own research to illustrate points that speak to them. Sessions will begin 13 Sept 2017 at Noon Eastern. Registration will be available shortly before at http://hangouts.DearMYRTLE.com

Marceline Beem “I have been researching my own family for 20 years, and have researched pro bono for several friends in the last 5 years. Most of my family is in the southeastern U.S., but I do have one line that goes to the Midwest and New England.”

Blaine Bettinger “I need to work on documentation! – I have been a genealogist for 25+ years, and a genealogical professional for 8+ years.”

Claudia Breland “… To get more out of the book, and practice with specific examples. I have the book and have been reading and studying – it’s enormously helpful in my work as a professional genealogist. – I first became interested in family history in 1974, when I was 20. I became a professional genealogist 8 years ago, and have been constantly learning and growing since then. I work with clients, I do genealogy presentations in Western Washington, and I have written books.”

Cary Bright “Started in 1997, as keeper of the last of the family ephemera for my father. Married into a Norman family and I am the only family historian. Love the research and learning to be a much better record keeper. GPS panel member 2015.”

Melinda Culpon “Continue learning. – Have been researching and trying to find more and correctly document information.”

Sheri Fenley “I am almost ready to go “on the clock” again with BCG and feel this will help me quite a bit. I consider myself a professional genealogist but want to become certified and then go for accreditation with ICAPGEN. Need just a bit more education mostly for self-confidence.”

Hilary Gadsby “Want to reflect the subject from the point of view of someone who is using largely sources in the UK. To illustrate that this book is relevant wherever you are carrying out your research. – I have been researching for about 17 years. When I started very little was on the internet. Research consisted of speaking to relatives and following up leads with ordering documents and visiting archives and libraries. I am an amateur who has learnt from others by reading and sharing research strategies. I also recently started a one name study.”

Lisa Gorrell “Creating citations is fun! Being on the panel is rewarding and an honor. Been researching own family over 20 years. Taking clients the past two years. Working towards certification.”

Valerie Eichler Lair “I need to read and study the book. There’s no better way than to “finally” be on a panel. Plus, DearMYRTLE twisted both my arms behind my back! – I am a professional genealogist and have conducted research since 1989.”

Dave Robison “It’s a matter of continuous improvement and self-education. This interactive format is productive and one that I enjoy being a part of. – Beginning in the late 90s, I searched for answers to my family background never offered to me growing up. After making a surprising number of discoveries on my own, I began to assist a few friends and other family members in their own research.”

Mary Jane Saylor “Board member of the Utah Genealogical Association. Served on the SLIG committee as assistant registrar and marketing coordinator. Attend most institutes and conferences, been researching for 30+ years.”

DearMYRTLE's Profile PicMyrt’s Musings

We have more than 10 panelists to allow for absences. Viewers may complete homework assignments, though priority will be given to discussion of panel participant’s submissions.

Please reference the syllabus and include your name at the top of each homework assignment. Post homework in a blog or public Google Doc and post the link in the hangout for the appropriate chapter’s study group session. Also take care to observe the book’s copyright restrictions.

Thomas W. Jones, Mastering Genealogical Documentation, (Arlington, Virginia: National Genealogical Society, 2017.) Softbound available from the publisher’s website www.ngsgenealogy.com. Kindle format at Amazon here: https://www.amazon.com/Mastering-Genealogical-Documentation-Thomas-Jones/dp/B0743HCD4T

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.


For Further Reading

GenDoc Study Group: Call for panelists

Mastering Genealogical Documentation by Thomas W. Jones will be the subject of our 2017 fall semester study group. As such we need a dedicated group of motivated panel participants willing to read a chapter and submit homework in advance of each study group session. The book is also available in Kindle format here.

Participants will review Dr. Jones’ homework examples but will post examples from their own research to illustrate points outlined in the focus chapter that speak to them.

  • UPDATE: Panelists will be announced shortly.
  • To appear as a panel participant, each must have reliable wired internet, a headset mic and earphones, and a webcam.
  • Google accounts are required for login.
  • Panelists meet in the green room 30 minutes prior to the scheduled start of each study group session.
  • Each panel participant will be added to a private Facebook group for back-channel discussions about attendance and other items not moving the chapter discussion forward. (This keeps the hangout’s unified chat free of off-topic discussions.)
  • Homework may be posted in a blog or a public Google Doc by noon Eastern on Monday prior to the Wednesday study group session.
  • Homework must include the author’s Google account name, and appropriate citation referencing Dr. Jones’ book at the top.
  • Each week Ol’ Myrt will compile and scan the complete set and upload a .pdf for all attendees to view.
  • All links will be posted at http://hangouts.DearMYRTLE.com in the appropriate chapter hangout’s unified chat.

All sessions will be held at noon Eastern, 11am Central, 10am Mountain and 9am Pacific.

Wednesday, 13 Sep 2017
Chapter 1 – The Purpose and Nature of Genealogical Documentation

Wednesday, 20 Sep 2017
Chapter 2 – Noncitation Aspects of Genealogical Documentation

Wednesday, 27 Sep 2017
Chapter 3 – Citation Settings, Forms and Shortcuts

Wednesday, 4 Oct 2017
Chapter 4 – Assembling Components into Clear Citations

Wednesday, 11 Oct 2017
Chapter 5 – Capitalization, Italics, Punctuation and Other Citation Subtleties

Wednesday, 18 Oct 2017
Chapter 6 – Determining a Source’s Publication Status

Wednesday, 25 Oct 2017
Chapter 7 – Issues in Citing Source Titles, Descriptions or Both

Wednesday, 1 Nov 2017
Chapter 8 – Authors, Creators and Informants

Wednesday, 8 Nov 2017
Chapter 9 – Citing Absent, Hidden, Obvious, and Perplexing Dates for Sources, Information and Events

Wednesday, 15 Nov 2017
Chapter 10 – Citing Numbered, Grouped, and Subgrouped Offline Sources and Information Items

Wednesday, 22 Nov 2017
Chapter 11 – Answering the Wherin and Whereis Citation Questions for Online Sources

Wednesday, 29 Nov 2017
Chapter 12 – Identifying Offline Publishers and Repositories

Wednesday, 6 Dec 2017
Chapter 13 – Citing Original Online Content

Wednesday, 132 Dec 2017
Chapter 14 – Citing Images of Previously Published Material

(December break)

Wednesday, 3 Jan 2018
Chapter 15 – Citing Images of Previously Unpublished Material

Wednesday, 10 Jan 2018
Chapter 16 – Multiparty Options for Citing Images

Wednesday, 17 Jan 2018
Chapter 17 – Documenting on Your Own

DearMYRTLE's Profile PicMyrt’s Musings

All too frequently researchers encounter undocumented online trees or compiled genealogies without nothing more than a slight nod to the source of information. We can do nothing more than use such ill-prepared family histories as a possible clue.

In fact, I rarely look at an online tree unless it is with the hope of finding original document sources of information I’ve not previously encountered.

Ol’ Myrt here heartily agrees with the publisher’s description of Dr. Jones’ book:

“Without adequate documentation, a well-researched family history or tree looks like fiction. Mastering Genealogical Documentation teaches genealogists how to cite all kinds of sources clearly, completely, and accurately—including sources for which no model citation exists.”

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.

Inaugural International Germanic Genealogy Conference (2017)

German genealogy experts you say? Traveling from Germany you say? Gathering in Minneapolis you say? Well, this Ol’ Myrt is so there. In fact, Mr. Myrt and I leave within the hour.

InternationalGermanicGen2017.jpg

Connections: International. Cultural. Personal.
The International German Genealogy Partnership (IGGP), formerly the German-American Genealogical Partnership, is proud to announce its inaugural conference to be held in Minneapolis, MN. The Germanic Genealogy Society (GGS) is the local host.

When: July 28-30, 2017
Where: Minneapolis Marriott Northwest
Registration is closed for the 2017 IGGC Conference.
If you have registered and need to make a change, please email: conference@IGGPartner.org

As an added bonus, from the website we find that Fritz Juengling PH.D.,AG has prepared a document to describe how to use the new online version of Meyers Orts- und Verkehrs-lexikon des deutschen Reichs. Meyersgaz description

DearMYRTLE's Profile Pic

Myrt’s Musings

I’m quite certain the IGGC instructors will share new research strategies with this Ol’ Myrt. In addition to my 1848ers from Saxony, I’m now working on my brother-in-law’s Bohemian WAGNER family who came directly to New Ulm, Minnesota in 1881. And you can bet I’ll be applying my new-found knowledge as we travel to New Ulm on our way home.

I look forward to attending a class session nearly every hour. There are no ambassadors or official bloggers to my knowledge, but I hope to see many of the usual suspects in attendance. It’s a concept – attend a conference and actually go to classes to learn. As we speak, our favorite German Genealogy Girl, Ursula Krause, has left for the Berlin airport, soon to be on her way. I look forward to meeting her and hosting a brunch in her honor when she travels to Salt Lake following the conference. Here are the two GermanGen Study Group sessions with Ursula from mDearMYRTLE’s YouTube Channel.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt     🙂
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.


 

The Written Conclusion – Proof Argument

The Written Conclusion – Proof Argument

Close-up of busineswoman's hands doing paperwork.Our final type of a written conclusion is the most complicated – the dreaded Proof Argument. Why ‘dreaded’ ? Well as Ol’ Myrt said – it’s complicated. A researcher arrives at a conclusion when analysis of multiple documents appear to provide information about a fact in an ancestor’s life. But it isn’t as cut and dry as a Proof Statement or a Proof Summary.

You’ll want tocontinue following along with DearMYRTLE’s “Don’t Panic! Review The Written Conclusion Study Group instead” posted at my old blog, this is the week to be studying Chapter 7 from Thomas W. Jones’ Mastering Genealogical Proof  (Arlington, Virginia: National Genealogical Society, 2013). [Book available from the publisher here and in Kindle format, described here.] Dr. Jones refers to the GPS (Genealogical Proof Standard) summarized at the Board for Certification of Genealogists website here: http://bcgcertification.org/resources/standard.html 

You’ll begin your study on page 87 in Dr. Jones’ book where he says “Proof arguments are documented narratives in which genealogists explain why the answer to a complex genealogical problem should be considered proved.” Find out there why the author also recommend three major sections to your proof argument. Here is our study group session to assist you with composing a proof argument.

 

 

DearMYRTLE's Profile PicMyrt’s Musings

I’ve had to write this sort of complicated narrative with pen and paper on occasion, instead of just typing things up. The dining room table was cleared, and I was able to work through every relevant document I collected. There is conflicting evidence to be resolved about of the birth year of my grandmother. Ol Myrt here must consider an old family story provided by my mother. It is her mother, Frances Irene (Goering) Froman McDonnell that we are once again studying.

To begin with, I’ll need to explain the family tradition that our grandmother lied about her birth year because when she met her second husband, she never wanted him to know she was three years older than he. Grandma Frances made mother promise if she died before her husband, mom was to keep the secret going. That’s why the funeral card isn’t a reliable source for the birthdate.

FrancesFuneralCard

I’d spend much time writing about each document, indicating how I weighed the evidence. I’d insert a table to keep track of things. I’d have to present documents to explain her change of name due to two marriages. I’d include census records, her 1st marriage license, and her delayed birth certificate. The latter is the most significant, since it was signed by the physician attending her birth. Of course, I would appropriately cite each item, as this gives me the opportunity to consider the motivation of each informant.

I particularly like the delayed birth certificate since the attending physician signed it, most likely having looked at her files to verify her findings. I remember my father had two rooms of patient files where he kept copious, though sometimes cryptic, notes during each examination – but I digress.

Then having lead my reader ‘down theeach garden path’ I’d restate my premise that Frances Irene (Goering) Froman McDonnell was born 22 Aug 1905.

Before I found this precious document, I had settled on a slightly different year. See DearMYRTLE’s WACKY Wednesday – How old WAS she? (video)

GOERINGFrances_1905Delayed Birth Certificate 1940

That’s the thing about written conclusions. While we do our very best to ‘get it right’ there is always the possibility that our hopefully very educated guess is incorrect. I was glad when new-to-me, more convincing evidence came to light.

How is your “complicated’ Proof Argument coming along? 

Extra Credit

Aside from learning it’s all about explaining your thought process in narrative format, participants may compose written conclusions based on each session’s topic.

  1. Follow along with the four weekly hangout sessions.
  2. Incorporate the principles Dr. Jones presents in Chapter 7 as mentioned above.
  3. Compose a written conclusion based on your own research.
  4. Make sure to include your name on the top of the page.
  5. Include reference material as follows:

    Reference Material

    Jones, Thomas W., “The Written Conclusion” Mastering Genealogical Proof,  (Arlington, Virginia: National Genealogical Society, 2013).

    Richley-Erickson, Pat. Mastering Genealogical Proof Study Group, DearMYRTLE’s YouTube Channel (http://ow.ly/dmhX30dhvOS : viewed July 2017).

  6. Publish your conclusion in blog or public Google Doc format.
  7. Submit only 1 conclusion per week as follows:
    Week 1: Proof Statement
    Week 2: Proof Summary
    Week 3: Proof Proof Argument
    Week 4: Clear Writing (take one of your previous proofs and rewrite following Dr. Jones’ advice.)
  8. Register each week’s write-up here: https://goo.gl/forms/lLalKcuAzQpHTuYJ3

Each entry makes the participant eligible to win a $100 Amazon Gift Card to be awarded during our next Mondays with Myrt #genealogy hangout, 7 August 2017. WOW! 

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt     🙂
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.