Is it time to write your MEMOIR?

Is it time to write your MEMOIR

A timely discussion with internationally recognized author, military records expert Jennifer Holik, who founded the WWII Research & Writing Center. She shares her new website Find the Answers Journey. It’s all about balancing work and homelife, dealing with life challenges, mechanisms for composing a memoir, and considering our audience. Sarah Bell from Australia writes “Such an important conversation to have – we need to talk more about how we feel and the impacts of illness on our own mental health. So inspiring to hear everyone’s stories.”

EMBEDDED VIDEO

SELECTED TEXT & LINKS WE MENTION

18:59:03 From Jenny Hawran : hi everyone from NERGC!
18:59:39 From Robbin Smith : hello all from miami
18:59:56 From Terri Kallio to All panelists : Howdy from Colorado
18:59:58 From Melissa Barker : Hello Everyone!
19:00:16 From JoAnn Lawrence to All panelists : Hello from New Jersey

19:03:10 From RussWorthington : Jennifer Holik’s WWII Research & Writing Center Facebook Group https://www.facebook.com/wwiirwc 

19:08:46 From RussWorthington : http://dearmyrtle.com/blog2/index.php/2018/04/03/wwii-education-site-and-writing-course-debuts/

19:09:27 From RussWorthington : Jennifer Holik’s WWII Research & Writing Center http://wwiiresearchandwritingcenter.com/

19:35:49 From Jenny Hawran : My civil war ancestor William Hawkins wrote poetry in his diaries while he was serving in Maryland. He wrote that he did it because the beauty of poetry took his mind off the ugliness of the bloody scenarios he was witnessing.
19:36:12 From Jenny Hawran : It inspires me to want to write
19:37:54 From Sarah Bell : Such an important conversation to have – we need to talk more about how we feel and the impacts of illness on our own mental health. So inspiring to hear everyone’s stories.
19:49:58 From Terri Kallio to All panelists : My grandparents all said – that’s the past it doesn’t matter now –
20:01:27 From Kathleen Daetsch to All panelists : I went through the same thing with my mother for three years.
20:03:08 From Terri Kallio  : When I wrote about my Uncle who died in WWII – I named the book – “Sincerely” – I named it that because every letter was signed sincerely even to his parents
20:05:16 From RussWorthington : http://www.findingtheanswersjourney.com


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ARCHIVED
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Exploring FindMyPast: American Red Cross Visitor Book 1943-1945 & Ray Wilton

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Alex Cox explains “US SERVICEMEN IN NORTH DEVON, ENGLAND, 1943-1945” contains entries for men who visited the local Red Cross Service Club during WWII. Myrt noticed the register has divider tabs for each state. Men signed in with the date, their name and hometown. Some added their APO (Army Post Office) number, their serial number and a few included their complete home street address. Some of these signatures may be the last record for the servicemen before losing his life in “Operation Tiger” a 2-day amphibious assault training exercise or in the D-Day assault on beaches in France. Here in the US, the soldier’s Army service file may have been destroyed in the fire in the Personnel Records Center in St. Louis and that makes this service club record entry all the more important.

Alex writes “Explore lists of over 5,000 US servicemen who were stationed in North Devon during WW2. The records consist of original visitor books kept by the local servicemen’s club. The servicemen served at the Assault Training Centre in North Devon, which was set up in 1942. It was established during the Second World War as a centre to develop and practice amphibious assault exercises to prepare for the Normandy landing on D-Day. They practiced on the beaches at Woolacombe and Saunton Sands.”

OPERATION TIGER – day 1 friendly fire, day 2 the E-boats attacked, so this practice resulted in a horrible disaster.
https://www.npr.org/2012/04/28/151590212/operation-tiger-d-days-disastrous-rehearsal

HEROES RETURN: RAY WILTON’S STORY (PART 1) Ray Wilton’s Story – Alex Cox’s maternal grandfather’s recollections about D-Day.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MoxglVqgSaE&t=2s

HEROES RETURN: RAY WILTON’S STORY (PART 2) Alex Cox and his mother accompany her father on his visit to France. He thinks of the men who gave their lives during the Normandy invasion. https://youtu.be/C7hm84u2Nfg


 

Fold3:

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: The following was received via email from our friends at Fold3.com, and may also be found in the official Fold3HQ Blog here.

This month we’re excited to highlight some of the British military records we’ve added to our collection!

British WWII Commando Gallantry Awards:
This collection contains the names of nearly 500 British Commandos who earned a Gallantry Award during WWII. The awards include Victoria Crosses, Distinguished Service Orders, Military Crosses, Distinguished Conduct Medals and Military Medals. The collection is alphabetized and includes rank, regiment, and the date the award was issued. In some instances, the full citation was published in the London Gazette. Where applicable, that citation is attached in the comment field.

British WWII Distinguished Conduct Medal Citations:
These records are an alphabetized list of non-commissioned officers and men in the army who were awarded the second highest award for gallantry during WWII. The records are cross-referenced to the London Gazette publication dates and tell the stories that inspired the award.

WWII Distinguished Flying Medals for British Soldiers: 
This collection is an alphabetized list of nearly 6,500 recipients of the Distinguished Flying Medal award. The index was transcribed from surviving Recommendations. In some cases, they contain a cross reference to the publication date in the London Gazette. Where no Recommendation was found, the relevant press release is entered.

British Companions of the DSO Awards, 1923-2010: 
This collection is an alphabetized list of recipients of the DSO Award and subsequent First, Second, and Third Bar awards from the British Navy and Royal Marines. The records are primarily from WWII, but pre-war and post-war campaigns are also included. The records include birthdates, family members and other biographical information along with the reason for the award recommendation.

British Recipients of the Military Cross:
This collection contains records for recipients of the Military Cross during WWI. The collection is alphabetized and includes name, rank, and battalion or sub unit and other biographical details. Military Crosses are cited in the London Gazette and those citations are attached, including the confirmation of the existence of that issue.

Search Fold3 for these are other international collections today!

World War II Research and Writing Center: 2018 Course Offerings

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: The following was received from our friend Jennifer Holik, Global Coordinator of the World War II Research & Writing Center, info@wwiirwc.com.


17 April 2018 – Chicago ,IL & Amstelveen, Netherlands

The World War II Research and Writing Center is pleased to announce the release of three new online courses on our educational website WWII Education. Did you know that the strategies we teach also apply to World War I and Korean War research? When you take our courses, you can apply your new skills and knowledge to multiple research projects.

Finding the Answers: Starting WWII Research
Learn everything you need to know about starting WWII research in nine short lessons with nine handouts. This course presents material all at once to allow you to move through the process as quickly or slowly as you choose. Please see our website for full course information.

Finding the Answers: WWII Research Online
Are you ready to take your online research to a new level? This course, in six modules which drip every 7 days, with numerous handouts, introduces you to:

  • Reasons to research WWII service online.
    • What records may be available online.
    • Techniques to make searching easier.
  • Strategies to help you search the ‘Go-To’ websites for research.
  • A look at library and newspaper websites.
  • Explore military museums, research libraries, and social media sites.
  • An introduction to European research experts and grave adopters.
  • Information on how Americans can work with European researchers to preserve more stories.
  • Where to go to learn more.

Are you ready to start? Please see our website for full course information.

Finding the Answers in the IDPF
Course dates: May 14 – July 16, 2018
The Individual Deceased Personnel File (IDPF) is one of the most important files researchers can obtain for World War II service members who died or are still considered Missing In Action (MIA.) The details contained in these files are more than date of death, cause of death, and locations of burials. We learn about the service history, medical history, family stories and grief, decisions which had to be made by family members, family drama, the inability to recover remains, and sometimes connect with other researchers who have requested the file in the past.

This course will begin on Monday May 14 and run for 10 weeks. You will explore seven extensive modules, which include 27 downloads, case studies, and worksheets. Additionally, you will be given access to an exclusive Facebook Group during the course period plus two additional weeks, in which you can have conversations, share files, and connect with other researchers.

Please see our website for full course information. http://wwiirwc.com

We will offer another session this fall. Registration information will be posted in July.


 

 

ARCHIVED: GreekGen Study Group 1- Original Surname and Village of Origin

GreekGenStudyGroup

WEBINARS IN THIS SERIES

OUR INSTRUCTOR
Carol Kostakos Petranek is a frequent traveler to Greece. Carol serves as co-director of the Washington, DC Family History Center (in Kensington, Maryland). She also serves as a Citizen Archivist at the National Archives (US) and in the FamilySearch digitization project at the Maryland State Archives

 

SELECTED COMMENTS

01:26:58 Cousin Russ: Link to GreekGen Study Group Google Sheet – http://bit.ly/DM_GreekGen
Spartan Roots Blog.

01:30:41 Cousin Russ: Carol’s Spartan Roots blog https://spartanroots.wordpress.com
01:33:26 Cousin Russ: Handout: Introduction to Greek Research https://www.dropbox.com/s/tkmdav69jerqxu7/Handout%201%20-%20Getting%20Started.pdf?dl=0
01:40:25 Cousin Russ: Handout: Using US Records to Prepare for Research in Greece — https://www.dropbox.com/s/1dxtkjxxzh9mifp/Handout%202%20-%20Using%20US%20Records%20to%20Prepare%20for%20Research%20in%20Greece.pdf?dl=0

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01:41:39 Cousin Russ: FamilySearch Wiki: Greece – https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/Greece_Genealogy
01:42:34 Randi Patrick: Will we have access to this chat after the lecture?
01:43:30 Cousin Russ: The Chat will be posted on Myrt’s Blog when this Webinar is posted
01:43:51 Randi Patrick: OK. Thank you.
01:43:57 DearMYRTLE: The account at FamilySearch is FREE.

01:57:18 Patty Markos: Carol, you happen to be a cousin somehow. Lol You recently sent a request to my brother. You’re amazing, btw! 🙂

2018-04-13_8-55-10

01:58:50 Cousin Russ: Hellenic Genealogy Geek Facebook Page — https://www.facebook.com/groups/118224528189671/
02:00:59 Cousin Russ: Don – Both websites have details on how to do download & upload raw DNA data and your GEDcom file of genealogy data. There are a number of FB DNA Groups.
02:08:04 Karen Trearchis: I have a baptismal record like this for my Dad.

02:35:13 Randi Patrick: Thank you, Carol for your presentation. It was very informative. It not only helped with Greek research but other ethnicities as well.
02:36:10 Panagiotis Papoulidis: Wonderful session Carol….thank you so much!
02:36:27 Suzanne Adams: This was wonderful Carol. Thank you! Excited to hear more about records in Greece next time! 🙂
02:36:31 athnamayporter: My village is now located in Albania since 1955 or so.
02:36:59 Patty Markos: Thank you so much Carol. I’ve already received family records for my father and mother using your GAK link from you blog. Amazing!
02:37:07 Karen Trearchis: Thanks Carol, this webinar was wonderful! Pat, we will adopt you!
02:37:09 athnamayporter: Any help would be so very helpful.
02:37:31 stacey Spanos: thank you, wonderful will be back
02:38:53 Karen Trearchis: someone just mentioned a village in albania, my Papou grew up in Hochiste, Albania
02:40:05 athnamayporter: In Albania, my village is in Sopiki
02:40:13 Cousin Russ: Our conversation will continue here — https://plus.google.com/u/0/+DearmyrtlePage/posts/QSdZqomNxRd
02:40:44 Karen Trearchis: I think the village was near Korce.
02:41:25 Jackie Wilson: Thank you for doing this!!!!!
02:41:43 athnamayporter: Sopike is in the mountains. near the boarder of Greece.


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